How to remove old iron pipe?

I need to remove some 2" diameter iron pipe from an old hot water heat system in my house in order to move a radiator. These pipes haven't been touched in 80 years and the fittings are proving very difficult to remove. Any suggestions on how to do this beyond getting a bigger pipe wrench?
Thanks, Tom
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Angle grinder to the rescue. Once you use it, you'll never ask again. Get good discs, though.
Tom wrote:

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a Metabo angle grinder & thin cut off wheels. use a face shield & gloves.. you'll go through the pipe like butter.. each cut will only take a few minutes.
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A Sawzall for the pipe and a sledgehammer for the fittings (Ts, etc.)
Nick
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wrote:

Hammering on the joints will loosen them. Same principle as a stuck jar lid.
How much hammering to loosen them? Probably about half as long as you've already spent trying to get them loose. - but at least 10 minutes of pounding should do it.
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Sawzall. Either that, or a big pipe cutter. Sawzall makes most sense. Extra sturdy blades.
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Christopher A. Young
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We used a compound pipe wrench for years to loosen stuck pipes. It has a large mechanical advantage, and you don't destroy the pipes or fittings. A 90 degree pull on that wrench only turns the pipe about 1/10 as much.
If the fittings are cast iron, Use two 3# hammers to break the fittings. Use one to pound and the other as a backup. That won't work well for wrot fittings though. If you don't use the back up hammer, you may cause a leak at another joint. Use gloves and eye protection so you don't get hurt. One guy holds the back up hammer and another pounds the fitting from the other side.
Of course there is always a sawzall. But then you have to thread the pipe for your new connection and that takes a very square cut.
Stretch
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Never heard of such a device. got a URL so I can see one online? Could be usefull.
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Chris,
Ridgid Tool Company makes them. Not cheap but lots of plumber/pipefitters should have them.
Stretch
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

here, you good for nothing turd.
http://www.ridgid.com/CatalogDocs/compoundleverage.jpg
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Or simply break the fittings w/ hand sledge...
Depending on size and layout, cutting pipe into shorter lengths makes handling a lot simpler so there's another reason for the Sawzall.
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