How to remove old black lino tile backing from pine floor before sanding?

I've tried cold scraping, hot water....too messy, think it cools too quickly,have to keep wiping up. hair dryer, last night tried steam iron held just above pitchy stuff, sometimes it worked and I was able to peel a liitle off down to floor boards but mostly some top layer moved but then I'm left with lower layer still. So far it looks unbeatable, then I thought maybe I'm not the only one, so I'm hoping someone has already solved the problem in a manageable way and can offer advice. I understand the sanding man won't touch it as it gums up his brushes/ sander. Hoping Robyn
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Heat gun? Like a hair dryer only hotter.
Ask the sanding man.
Bob
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Had a simlar problem about 25 years ago when I had to get glued down carpet pad off a concrete floor in the basement family room. (No, I do not know what the prior owner was thinking. But just to give you an idea, the glued pad was under brown plaid indoor outdoor carpet.)
Despite lots and lots of scraping the black glue crap and final layer of the pad wouldn't come up fully.
I resorted to a solvent. Just plain paint thinner. Lots of it.
Note: Exterior sliding door was open, the water heater in the utility room was electric, not gas, and the furnace was off and the pilot light on the funace was off. (And no, I also do not why the first owner and the builder had electric stove, gas heat and electric hot water.)
Anyway, i put aout a quart paint thinner on a 3' x 3' square and let it sit about 15 minutes, and scraped with a with a 4 inch joint compound / taping "knife" thingy. Scraped up the crud on each pass. Scraped the joint compound thingy off with rags and paper towels and into a bucket. Repeated a lot. Washed floor with a degreaser then with hot soapy water. Took about a week of evenings for a 15' x 24' room.
I'm glad I was a lot younger then. Not sure my knees would take it now.
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jJim McLaughlin wrote:

I did about the same, except I used mineral spirits. Available in the paint department. I just poured some out on the floor and then started wiping it up. I only had a closet floor, but you sure need to be careful about breathing the fumes or let any kind of ignition source near by.
Bill Gill
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old tile is likekly asbestos and adhesive asbetsos too
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Well, you don't *know* that. But even if you did:
So what?
Using solvent, any asbestos is wet. Very wet. Its also encapsulated. It ain't going anywhere, especially airborne.
As a one time project, not an "every day for years job" the health risks approach zero as an upper limit.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Actually it is probably the old asphalt tile, and does not have any asbestos in it. That was what they put down with the black tar.
Bill Gill
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i know of old ashalt tile that had black tar adhesive tested positive for asbestos
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In the good old days, EVERYTHING was made of asbestos!!
Home Depot also carries a solvent to break up the old black cutback glue. Works OK and smells like hell.
Its going to be a project that's for sure, just make sure to get it all out before someone comes in there to sand down those pine floors.
Get those window fans going and wear that mask!

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On Jun 11, 12:07?pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

have it tested for asbestos, if its asbestos the worst thing you can do is sand it.......
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Both the tiles and cuttback adhesive probably are asbetsos based but to be honest - so what? Do you know how much it would cost to have someone come in and do the exact same thing that you are going to do? With the stuff being wet - after you apply the solvent to it - it ain't going anywhere.
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On Jun 12, 9:59 am, poison snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Thank you to everyone for their imput.
I've done about half now, bit each day. I'm using a Bosch heat gun and it's softening it enough to scrape off. So $59 aus at Bunnings hardware, money well spent.
What an interesting site Cheers Robyn
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Get you a block of dry ice and lead the scraper with it.
--
Steve Barker

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wrote:

To get up carpet glue on old wood floors, I use a rug shampoor. I set the bristles all the way out, load the canister with hot water and soap, and take my time. You can control the wetness eaily and you have powered bristles so you don't kill yourself. Don't know if it will work on your type of glue but it might be worth a try.
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There are various products that will work on the backing but not sure about the pine aspect. One product is available at many grocery stores called "citra-solv" It's an orange cleaner that comes in a very small bottle and can be quite expensive. This is not a normal "orange cleaner." Another product that I've found is De-Solv-it. About $7 for a spray bottle. I've used it all over concrete floors but never on pine. I think if you worked it with a brush and then sanded after it dries you'd be okay.
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wrote:

I did this several years ago with Adhesive Remover, bought by the gallon at Menards. It was seriously nasty stuff, containing Toluene and MEK, I believe. Did the trick, but probably causes cancer even in states other than CA.
JK
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