How to remove metal door frames

The interior doors have a metal door frame, molded to look like it has the trim pieces. Its appears to cover the wallboard on both sides. It seems pretty firmy attached, though the fasterners are not apparent, The carpet wraps around the bottom and extends to the middle.
That's not really much of a description, but it's just a molded metal door frame; the house is from the 60's
Has anyone any experience in taking these out and installing a pre-hung door?
Without screwing up the carpet?
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It's possible that this jamb was installed prior to the drywall/ plaster being applied to the wall.
There may be flanges that extend under the drywall/plaster which are attached to the framing members with screws/nails into the narrow side of the studs used to frame the rough opening. You may have to cut back the drywall/plaster to expose the fasteners.
God luck!
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Right on the money derbydad,,We used 3 clips(flanges)on each side,,rarely used them on top of a buck less than 4' wide,,if it is a fire rated metal doorbuck it could be filled with cement or basecoat plaster too..The clips should have short self-tapping panhead screws on both sides of the stud,,after they are removed and the flooring dealt with the buck can be tapped over at the bottom and it should pull off the drywall and down,,sometimes the buck has to be bent around alot and Ya might be lucky to get it out without extra damage to the wall..If it is fire rated it wo'nt sound hollow when rapped on with knuckles so check that before anything else is done.. Sometimes there are metal studs to go along with a metal buck,,,I've seen 2x4s married with the metal,,,or,,,the metal studs removed and replaced with wood...Firecode may have been an issue when built and may still be one..I just do'nt know from the info provided. When it's removed the new install should be standard process if it's wood frame.. Dean
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There's four of them and they're in a hallway I'm going to gut, but I was hoping not to damage the walls or floors in the four rooms. Doesn't look like that's going to be the case.
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Check out how the frame is built - specifically the head/jamb connection. If there are welded seams then the door buck probably went in before the drywall and you'll have to do some excavation. If the seams aren't welded, and there are visible screw heads through the sides of the jamb (there might be covers on the access holes - depends on the manufacturer) you probably have a knock down buck. These are assembled in place after the drywall goes on. The visible (or not) screws are to brace the jamb against the framing at the intermediate points. There are metal tabs on the bottom of the frame, on top of the drywall, that are screwed into the framing to secure it. You may have to remove the baseboard next to the door to find the tabs.
R
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Seemed to have lucked out on this one. The frames were held in by straps on the bottom of the jamb on the outside of the drywall, and a clamping system at the top of the jamb on one side. So they came out cleanly without damaging the drywall.
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Lucking out would have been just doing it on your own. When you post a question and get the answer before you go mucking about, that's smart, not lucky.
R
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