How to remove glued-on quarter-round from baseboard?

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Steve:
I suggest trying a Fein Multi-Master and use the right angle saw blade attachment to remove the quarter-round.
good luck, Mike
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Steve,
Since the damage will be hidden (partially) by the carpeting, would it be enough to use a little spackle to even things out? Or is the damage worse than that?
On a side note, what idiot would glue on 1/4 round?????
I usually tell my clients that demolition (any kind) is by nature a discovery process which can lead to expenses not covered under the original quote/estimate. Very few, once they think about it, complain.
JC
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The cousin of the idiot who owned a house before my friend bought it. They stuffed the cold air returns with loose fibreglass insulation for reasons too nauseating to try and guess. The HVAC installed a nice new furnace, cranked it up and said "WTF??"
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Glue softens with heat. A torch gets too hot, but maybe a heat lamp or two aimed at the baseboard... give it a few minutes, then pry. If/when it comes off, move the lamps down to the next few feet of molding.
If you could block airflow with some boards, a hot-air gun could shoot down a long length of trim.
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"Steve" wrote:

A 1,500 watt heat gun will usually soften most adhesives to break the joint.
Use a stiff putty knife and "play" the heat carefully on the surface so you don't burn the surrounding wood.
Patience is a virtue on this project.
Lew
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If regular carpenters glue was used a heat gun might soften the glue and allow the separation of the quarter round from the baseboard. Work from the back of the baseboard if you can.
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A 50/50 mix of hot water/vinegar should loosen wood glue. Or, you can use steam.
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Fein Multimaster
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The baseboard should be 3/8 to 1/2 inch off the floor for carpeting. The carpet installers will tuck the carpet under the baseboard for a clean secure fit. Ask the carpet installers what size gap they want. Replace the baseboard if you want to give him a good job. I find it easier to cut and fit it, paint then install. A quick topcoat after it's installed to cover nailheads/puttied nailheads/corner caulking.
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alt.home.repair:

The existing baseboard goes below the surface of the existing engineered wood floor. It's not coming off the wall. The carpet will go on top of the wood.
Where I installed *new* baseboards, I left them " off the ground. That's the thickness of the adjoining tile floors.
On other jobs I've spent hours carefully sanding, filling, and painting baseboards, only to have to do it all over again the day after the carpeters come. I now assume they all do it, and I occasionally have a pleasant surprise when I follow behind competent workers.
--
Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
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Steve wrote:

A modified flat bar. Sometimes they can be bought sold as a restorers bar. The modification is starting with a small flat bar grind the short end so the bevel is the other way for easier driving beween the pieces to start the seperation. Thin the other end just a bit and sharpen in (be carefull) to cut the joint once you get a starting point.
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Glue softens with heat (more than wood, at least). If you can aim a couple of heat lamps at a section for five minutes, it should penetrate to the glue joint and pry-off will work.
Or a heat gun, with a channel over the molding to guide the air? You don't want the higher heat of a blowtorch.
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Have you tried a heat gun on the parts that don't pop off? Depending on the type of glue, that might do the job.
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alt.home.repair:

The client decided just to rip it off and let the carpet cover the damage. Price is a factor. I'll putty, sand, and paint anything that shows above the carpet.
I used a thin putty knife to cut through the glue joint, then a stiff putty knife to pry. The rest came off with minimal damage -- nothing like the 1/4"-deep gouges from before. And, surprise, when I turned the next corner, the quarter-round was nailed down -- to the wood flooring.
--
Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
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Can you determine what kind of glue it is? Maybe it can be desolved or softened. How about trying a heat gun?
Charley
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