How to remove glued-on quarter-round from baseboard?

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My client wants to put carpet down over his hardwood floors. (Yeah, I know, he's an idiot.) As a first step, he wants the quarter-round removed from the baseboard.
The quarter-round is glued on, not nailed. Arrrgh!
A good bit of it just popped off, since glue doesn't stick well to paint. Where he hit bare wood with the glue, though, a big chunk of the baseboard is coming off with the quarter-round. I stopped when the second chuck came off, and I have to give him a recommendation.
Any suggestions how to proceed? I know the carpet will hide a good bit of the damage, but I want to give him a good job. I guess I can fill it with putty, but the carpet guys are coming next week, and I don't have forever.
--
Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
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Is baseboard that expensive to install?
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OOPS! Wrong post; sorry!
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I'd suggest locating the spots where it's glued wood to wood and getting a chisel or a suitably thin pry bar and striking downward on it, so that if it does break a bit, it'll be less likely to tear along the grain.
-Nathan
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alt.home.repair:

That's what I was doing when the damage occurred. Pieces of the baseboard are coming off in chunks.
In another message EFGH suggested replacing the baseboard, and that will work, but it's a special-order profile, so I might do that after the carpet guys finish screwing up the paint.
I had a thought that I might put new quarter-round back after the carpet is installed, but I don't like that look. Obviously the client doesn't either, or he wouldn't have asked me to remove it.
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Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
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I sure would NOT do woodwork and paint after brand new carpet, bad sequencing in my opinion. Get the walls and trim done, carpet last.
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Unfortunately, that's not an option with carpet companies. They *always* screw up the baseboards. If they're going carpet an entire house in a morning, they can't stop to be careful. (You get what you pay for. :) )
--
Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
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misc.consumers.house, snipped-for-privacy@online.newsgroup says...

I had my whole house done in afternoons (two floors). The installers were great, even though they were subs for Home Despot. They said there was a possibility of nicking the woodwork and to have something to touch them up ready, but they were great. No dings in the sheetrock either. It can be done.
--
Keith

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I did that once with nailed-on quarter round. From my assortment of putty knives, I chose one thin & flexible enough, tapped it down behind the molding with a rubber mallet, and slid it along until I came to the next nail. At those points, I used the putty knife to hold the molding away from the surface behind it so I could get a tiny pry tool in there.
What a pain in the ass.....it still did some damage to the bigger molding behind the quarter round, but oh well. Will our customer help with putty, and the paint job on the molding behind the quarter round? If not, you might have to delay the carpet installation.
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I would attack it with a stiff-bladed putty knife every six inches or so and if that proved too damaging might, in the end, replace base board where necessary. Appears that either outcome is going to require a little sanding, primer and paint.
--
Dave in Houston



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Steve wrote:

A flush cut hand saw or Fein Multimaster?
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Take off all the quarter round. Assess the removal damage. Fill, prime and paint what's worst. Consider replacing the quarter round with a larger size or even door stop molding to hide any other annoying damage. HTH
Joe
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You should never refer to a client as an "idiot". Not only is it crass, it can easily get back to the client. In which case I wouldn't blame him for firing you and holding you reponsible for paying for the required repairs/cleanup.
As a first step, he wants the quarter-round

Does he want it replaced? With What? What are chances replacing the 1/4-round plus the carpet will sufficiently hide the damage of the removal? The 1/4-round is functional: It keeps vacuum, etc., from bumping the baseboard and takes the beating the baseboard would otherwise suffer. 1/4-round is meant to be easily removable and replaced for just that reason.

Ouch. That means you're committed to the job too, unless he decides to fire you. I would be very careful about how the final contract is worded so that both you and the client are protected. Be certain he'll be satisfied with the outcome.

Replace the 1/4-round to hide the damaged areas.
To remove the rest of it, use a tough putty knife sharpened at the end like a blade, or a chisel, and a mallet to break the glue joint itself rather than just force the joint open, which is what tears the wood out. Other than maybe heat but I've no good ideas here.
Is the glue still soft or is it the kind that gets rock hard? If it's pliable at all, heat might help soften it for removal. Hard to say but it might work. If the glue is brittle enough, perhaps whacking it with a hammer will break it?
Can't think of any type of tool, router, saw etc. that could get up that close to do the job but maybe others will have some good ideas that way. Right now it sounds like your profit margin is going to take a good hit.
HTH
Pop`
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I just recently removed my existing baseboard/quarter rounds and replaced them with new. Not a hard job at all.
After I was done I had new carpet installed. Much to my surprise, the installer wanted to know if I wanted the quarter round removed. He said some people prefer the carpet to go right up to the baseboard.

The number one purpose is to fill the gap between the floor and the baseboard. But I'm so used to seeing it there, I just think it looks right being there.
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wrote:

We don't know what behind the OP's baseboards. If it's plaster, removing the baseboard may turn into a job that is not pleasant at all. I've been through this.
"Not pleasant" is an understatement.
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alt.home.repair:

Thanks for the marketing advice, but he's a friend.

It won't be replaced. He wants carpet up to the baseboard. I agree with him that it looks better without the quarter-round

Most likely, the carpet *will* hide the damage.

For this one there's no contract. I'm working time and materials at a low, low rate of $30/hour. He's been remodeling his house by himself for the last 2 years, and had every room taken apart at once. His wife insisted he needed help to finish, so that's where I came in. I've been working half-days for the last couple of months, and most of the work is now finished. He was limited to nights and weekends, so he never got to spend time with his family.

The first two walls came off easy as pie. An entire 8-foot section popped off when I slipped my putty knife behind one end. When I turned the corner, though, I found that he hadn't painted the baseboard before putting on the quarter-round, so the glue holds very firmly.

Thanks for the help. It's all good.
--
Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
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I would suggest taking a look at the Fein Multi-Master and using their right angle saw tooth make a small saw kerf behind the quarter-rouund and cut it off.
good luck, Mike
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I would suggest taking a look at the Fein Multi-Master and using their right angle saw tooth make a small saw kerf behind the quarter-rouund and cut it off.
good luck, Mike
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Steve:
I suggest trying a Fein Multi-Master and use the right angle saw blade attachment to remove the quarter-round.
good luck, Mike
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