how to remove bulb "frozen" in socket

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wrote:

If the power is still on, you can cook your potatoes and carrots and have a real nice dinner.
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wrote:

lol. Good one.
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Some day when you get a metal filing,piece of glass or just scratch your cornea doing general stuff, then you will understand.
If you think it's stupid to wear safety glasses doing this then you should really get off knowing I sometimes wear safety glasses even when painting. Not because of paint. Because of bushes & shrubs.
You need to experience (and probably will with your comment) day 1 of a scratched cornea.
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wrote:

Sometimes there IS an advantage to wearing glasses.
--
90 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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Lots of good recommendations given.
Don't even bother taking precautions in case the bulb breaks. Break it in something right off while you 100% know and expect it.
Knowing that it might break while concentrating on something else isn't good enough. Remember, it's gonna break and implode/explode a bit.
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Frank Thompson wrote:

A LOT of suggestions about breaking the bulb and using pliers to remove the base. But if you try this, you'll never use pliers again. When a bulb breaks and leaves the base in the socket, use another bulb. Push the bulb base into the broken base and keep pressure on it while unscrewing. The new bulb base exerts pressure over the whole surface of the old base, giving enough friction to break the old base loose. Especially good for deep recessed lamps like floodlights where you don't have room to manipulate pliers. And it keeps your hands off the metal portion of the socket.
Bob
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Bob wrote:

Wow - sounds like a great idea. Kind of like pliers, except with a fragile glass handle that's harder to control, and no real grip or leverage on the old base! You probably shouldn't wear gloves, because they could keep you from feeling your progress, and you probably wouldn't want safety glasses either, because they could interfere with your vision. And be sure to stand on a rocking chair or a swivel stool to reach the broken bulb. Don't bother turning off the breaker, either, because who wants to walk all the way down to the basement? Sheesh.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Hey dude, don't knock it until you try it! I've done over a hundred like that and have never had one break in my hand. If you're that safety conscious, keep an old exterior flood light for the job.
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wrote:

Turn the power off, break the bulb, and then jam one leg of a pair of needle nosed pliers between the remains of the bulb and the socket.
Now twist the pliers like you are opening up an old fashioned can of tuna. The remnants of the bulb should tear and start to wind up on the nose of the pliers.
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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote in

Brings back memories of opening up a can of "chum" down by the river feeeeshin' :-)
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