how to remove bulb "frozen" in socket

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Will appreciate any clues on how to remove a light bulb that seems to be frozen in socket. Bulb is 60W and is in one of five sockets on ceiling fan. Has ceramic "lampshade" which cannot be removed without removing bulb first. Last time this happened in similar situation the bulb ended being broken which made a big mess.
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Frank Thompson wrote:

Turn off light. Put on a leather glove. Hold a bucket under bulb in case it breaks. Twist bulb. If it breaks, use pliers to get socket out.
Lena
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Lena wrote:

Good advice from DanG and Lena, but I would add a bit of work for you (sorry). I would turn the light off at the breaker (not the switch). After you break the bulb -- and yes, you will break the bulb -- I would use an electrical tester to check for power before I touched anything. You can get a cheap tester (they don't cost very much) when you're going to the store to get replacement bulbs.
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Before you break the bulb, spray in some penetrating oil or even WD-40 and let it soak overnite. Almost guaranteed to come out EZ if you use kroil.
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Don't forget safety glasses.
later,
tom @ www.FreelancingProjects.com
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Lena wrote:

Use a PVC-coated glove. It will grip the glass far better, so you don't have to squeeze as hard, greatly increasing your chances of not breaking the bulb.
How about putting a touch of anti-seize compound on the threads of the new bulb before installing? Can anyone confirm/refute that? Or, how about spraying the threads with Molybdenum Disulfide?
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"Hints to Heloise" or something similar says to use a potato. Jamb it into/onto the broken glass and lamp base and wind it out.
I have always used a needle nose pliers. ______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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DanG spake thus:

The other tip I've heard is to jam a carrot in there and twist.
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Frank Thompson wrote:

Well the suggestion made should help you get the lamp out. Once you get it out, take the rest of them out as well. Now go to the hardware store and buy new 60W lamps that have real brass threds not aluminum or brass colored aluminum threads. Those cheaply made (but some times over priced) lamps are the cause of your problem.
--
Joseph Meehan

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Great advice. Yes brass based bulbs are less likely to seize. However, try to find a brass based bulb, it seems there are only a couple of manufacturers these days and they have all switched to aluminium bases for most of their bulbs. Sometimes a little silicon grease (not caulk) or other lubricant will prevent seizing in difficult sockets. The worst combination is aluminium based bulbs in aluminium sockets, especially in outdoor fixtures.
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Silicone (grease or spray) and/or dielectric grease is a bad idea - they are insulators!
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Bob M. wrote:

Dielectric grease is a insulator, but it does not cause a problem with the electrical connection. It also does not contain any materials that may corrode common electrical contacts. It forms a barrier to O HO and other possible sources of corrosion while providing a lubricant as well. It is recommended for light bulbs among other things.
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On Mon, 25 Sep 2006 11:48:23 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"

I heard bulbs wiped down with a little wd-40 is a good thing. Any experiences?
later,
tom @ www.NoCostAds.com
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Tom The Great wrote:

Oil is much better. WD40 is not billed as a lubricant.
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Tom The Great wrote:

I would suggest a dielectric grease. You can find it at the auto parts store. WD-40 is a great water displacement, but it is not a very good lube and in this case it is not really the lube that is needed, rather the protection from oxygen and water.

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I don't know why people are saying things like "wear goggles". If the WD40 idea doesn't work, just put a sock or something over the bulb, break it, then force the remaining base to unscrew with pliers, or 2 pairs of pliers (one on each side of the metal base).
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Because wearing safety glasses is easy to advise and won't do any harm?
I've had some success gently working stubborn bulbs both ways, gradually unscrewing them. If the bulb breaks, needle-nose pliers have been a simple fix. I've always managed to use pliers without damaging the socket, so I've never felt the need to try produce.
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wrote:

Pliers do work 95% of the time just by putting in the socket and pulling them open while turning. Like you say, the stubborn one you gotta grab the bulb base.
<Man! I swore I killed that breaker!!!! :-)>
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wrote:

Pliers are often too big for the job, not fitting between the base of the broken bulb and the socket. I've often had to remove broken bulb bases. I use scissors. Of course, that's not trying to CUT the base, but using them sideways as thin pliers.
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wrote:

Lotsa kinds of pliers out there!
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