How to pump the gas out of auto gas tank?

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Like I said before, I have had JB Weld hold for years. But it depends on how bad the leak is and how the rest of the tank looks. If it's all pitted, I'll replace it, because it will soon leak elsewhere. But the JB Weld spot wont leak, I know that from experience.
It's a 95 Chevy 3/4 ton pickup. It's in good shape for it's age. Aside from brakes, tires, belts, battery, filters and a new radiator, it been trouble free. And I had to replace the blower motor and fix the wiring to that blower too. It recently needed a tuneup, cuz the dist cap was cracked, but all of that is normal wear and tear. At the same time, I wont keep it forever, so if I can fix the tank, I will.
The only thing I did not like about this truck are those damn side mirrors on the doors. Three times they have broken off, just because someone walked against them. I finally rigged up some generic mirrors that have SOLID mounting, not cheap assed pot metal. And, the rear bumpers all rust out. I was forced to replace mine after I jackknifed a hay wagon and destroyed what was left to that rusty thing. I found a solid used one on Craigslist, from a newer model. But I had to modify the brackets a bit.
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On Sun, 06 Dec 2015 15:41:07 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

I meant to ask about that. My 2000 Toyota doesn't have a flapper. Have they stopped using them or is mine broken?
I know when I changed caps, for the one with the spring-loaded hole in it, so I didn't have to remove the cap to add gas, I got a code. With the original cap, it's air-tight, or something, so maybe they don't need a flapper anymore.
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On Sun, 06 Dec 2015 15:41:07 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

I drove over a chrome strip once, on my way to work, and when I was almost there, I slowed down and smelled something. But since I worked at a steel company, I figured I smelled work.
But a guy pulled up beside me and said gas was running out out of my tank.
So during lunch I borrowed a car and bought a repair kit for holes in gas tanks. The kind with a 4"x4" vinyl envelope that you bend (and thus break the divider inside) and tthen bend back and forth to mix it. It came with some fiberglass cloth. It all comes in a box. The hole was as big as a silver dollar. I put it on after work, but it was so hot out the epoxee hardened before I got it on right. I had to drive home with the leak. I could only hold a gallon or less and could only drive about 4 miles before I had to buy gas. But I still ran out of gas when I was 3/4 of the way home. Had to hitch to a station and back.
I probably took my bicycle to buy another kit, and I put it the freezer for 15 minutes, or some other length of time. That gave me more time to work, plus it was morning and nowhere near as hot out.
Patch worked fine, and was good for 3 years when I took my car to be painted. It leaked when I got it back, and I guess sitting in the paint shop with all those solvents in the air somehow ruined the patch. I still don't understand it, but it didn't seem like a coincidence.
I patched it again with the same product, and strange to say, that patch failed also after 3 years, almost the exact same length of time. So maybe it *was* a coincidence that that's when I had my car painted. Can't you watch the u nderside of the car to see if it's leaking.
Another car, I think I was getting bad gas mileage. I parked across the street to go to the library and I looked back for some reason and saw a wet spot on the pavement. It turned out the gas line was leaking near where it started to go over the left front wheel well.
No easy way to patch it so I used GE silicone. It worked for a couple months at least, but then the car was stolen so I don't know how long it would have lasted.
You don't have to buy something except a plain piece of hose to see if a hose will go down into your tank. If it does, then you can buy a siphon with a built-in pump. They work. You only have to get it started. After that the pump isn't needed. But you need containers suifficient to hold what, 18 gallons of gas??

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On 12/6/2015 4:41 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

First thing I'd do is locate the leak. They sell repair kits you can use wet. That is easiest if suitable in your case.
You can buy a siphon pump with a bellows so you don't have to suck on the hose. Problem is, many tanks have a baffle to prevent putting a hose down the filler pipe.
If you are going to replace the tank, get a pan and poke a hole with a screwdriver like the thieves do.
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On the right track. To run the pump pull its relay from the fuse panel and jumper the correct pins. Got this idea from the service manual. Even happened to have a scrap of wire with crimp on spade connectors that fit the relay connectors.
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