How to protect (low voltage?) wire on TOP of concrete driveway in slot


There's a wire crossing my concrete driveway in the slot which I tripped on and kicked up and need to put back.
It just about fits in the groove, almost filling the groove. I think it's for the low-voltage lights but I'm not sure what it's for.
What "material" would I use to "caulk" the wire back into the groove so that it's protected from people tripping on it like I did?
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On Jul 5, 7:31 pm, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

Gray or black polyurethane caulk would be my first choice, but there are others. A home center will have a selection. http://www.google.com/products?hl=en&q=driveway%20concrete%20caulk
R
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Elmo wrote:

There is a grey self leveling caulk available that is intended for filling expansion joints in concrete that should work fine. You should be able to find in in the concrete area at most any building supply place.
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On Jul 5, 6:31 pm, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

First pull the entire wire out of the groove. Set it aside. Borrow or rent a common circular saw with a diamond blade. Use the saw to deepen and/or widen the groove as needed. Clean out the groove. Fill it half way with a caulk recommended for concrete. Insert wire, press firmly down and top off groove with sealant. Now it's permanent. Return the saw to the owner. Wasn't that easy?

Joe
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what's the wire for? just curious...
Mark
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On Tue, 6 Jul 2010 19:06:17 -0700 (PDT), Mark wrote:

I do not know. Maybe landscape lighting? The house was a foreclosure so there are many enigmas, this wire just being one of them.
I loved the idea of digging the groove deeper, and then embedding the wire half in the caulk and having the rest of the caulk above the wire.
Now it's off to Home Depot for the right caulk and gun.
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On Wed, 7 Jul 2010 06:22:23 +0000 (UTC), Elmo

Are you trained to use a GUN? You need to go to gun class before you use any kind of gun.
Now for the question of the day. Do you have working landscape lighting? If not, why are you reinstalling the wire? Find out what it's for before working on it. Maybe you dont need it, or maybe someone dis something dangerous like embed a 120V lamp cord. Follow it to see what it connects to.
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On Tue, 6 Jul 2010 19:03:23 -0700 (PDT), Joe wrote:

This is the best idea ever!
It makes the most sense.
Thanks!
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You won't find the best sealants at Home Depot type stores. Go to a construction supplier of sealants. Get Bostick 1100 FS - the FS is for Fast Set but it still takes a few days to set completely. This stuff sticks like crazy and stays flexible so it will stretch if the concrete cracks and moves a bit. The one I used was grey in color but it may also come in black, not sure any more.
Like any other sealant or glue job it is absolutely necessary to clean all surfaces or even the best sealants won't stick.
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On Wed, 07 Jul 2010 14:32:16 GMT, Reno wrote:

I'm going to clean the crack with a pressure washer.
That should clean it well enough, don't you think?
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On 7/7/2010 3:40 PM Elmo spake thus:

Yes, so long as you let it dry and then sweep out any debris left in it.
--
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with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.
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Yes, that will clean it well. It needs to be dry, too, so either wait a while or use compressed air or a heat gun to dry it out. Some compressors add a lot of oil to the air which would prevent the sealant from sticking so check yours by blowing air onto a clean towel.
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On 7/6/2010 7:03 PM Joe spake thus:

>

Could do that, but I probably wouldn't if it isn't necessary, as it makes it more likely the slab could crack under the groove (unless you *want* an expansion joint there or something).
--
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