How to protect cracked glass in motorcycle speedometer

How to protect cracked glass in motorcycle speedometer
I want to keep water out of a motorcycle speedometer with cracked glass.
Congratulate me, I just got a "new" motorcycle from 1969, that has't been ridden since 1971.
There was some strange crud on the speedometer, and sliding a blade underneath it, and lifting up, with the pivot right at the edge of the glass, I still cracked the glass. Stupid me. But only two pieces, no chips. (In fact, only one piece since the crack has only gotten half way across)
They sell sheets of "plastic" with which to laminate your own identification etc. It's durable, sticky, and doesn't interfere with the view of the paper, etc. underneath it. I thought of covering the glass with a piece of that. What do you think? Any better ideas?
(I don't know if I can get the part or not, or if I can open the speedometer or not, but I don't want to try until the bike is actually running.)
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Use a wide piece of clear packing tape.
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mm wrote:

That should do it fine.
But for safety's sake I'd consider slipping a plastic bag over the speedo if the bike's going to be sitting out in a rainstorm, just to prevent any possible seepage of water through the cracked glass at the outer edge of your "patch".
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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This isn't much info. What did you get. We'd like ot know!

<snip>
I had the same issue back i the 80's and was informed that getting into the speedometer was never intended so it's difficult at best. If you decide to go about it expect to create new air leaks likely adding to the likelihood that it will eventually fog like a cheap watch. I like you own suggestion but would add a very fine bead of clear caulk around the rim.
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wrote:

Oh, yeah, I meant to say but got distracted. A Honda CB-450.

OK, 2 votes for caulk. Caulk it is. Thanks you guys.
This has only been ridden 2800 miles in the last 37 years (2 owners) and right now I'll be happy if I ride it 300 miles. So most of the time it will be under the cover I made from one of those blue woven tarps. I doubt I will ride in the rain, or even get caught in the rain, but we'll see. I"m sure I will have more questions in the weeks to come.
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the
to
likelihood
suggestion
Go on ebay or a vintage motorcycle web site or company, and buy a replacement glass or speedo? Stuff like speedo glass usually fits multiple years and brands, since that is almost always an outsourced part.
aem sends...
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I'm not into Bikes anymore...(reflexes went south after too many birthdays)...But I agree just buy a NOS speedo or find the correct replacement ... If you are anywhere in the area Carlisle Pa has their annual Bike swap meet & show scheduled for this weekend...BUT I;m sure there are quite a few vendors who specialize in replacement parts for vintage bikes...
Bob G.
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On Mon, 17 Jul 2006 04:34:07 GMT, "ameijers"

There is a guy very near here who restores Hondas and has a pretty big parts supply. He has a model like mine for sale for 5500 dollars (although mine is probably worth about 5 dollars.) I'll call him when I need something specific, and you're right, he or someone might have this, the glass or the speedometer, but I'll wait until the bike is running before I spend the money.

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And while you're in there,put in a baggie of silica gel to absorb moisture. (do the work in a dry environment,too)
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Jim Yanik
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I have loads of those. I save them whenever I get one. I presume putting them in a hot dry place, like the clothes drier, will dry the silica out to be good as new??
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I don't know if the clothes dryer gets hot enough. IIRC,your oven on "warm" is recommended.(~200 degF?)
ISTR that while at Tektronix,we put silica gel canisters in our drying oven at 140degF (it took many days),but the oven also had a negative pressure inside,to draw out moisture from instruments we washed.
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Jim Yanik
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