How to properly use a hammer on nails?

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The tests I did were with plywood (1/2 - 3/4) stapled to a 2x4 flatwise as the "receiving" member.
The staples were Senco 16 gage 7/16" crown fired from an M2 stapler.
Samples made with clusters of 5 staples were tested & yielded about 250 lbs per staple peak load. Based on load vs deflection (deflections at peak load were quite large) I chose to use 50bs, where deflection was well below 1/16" as a "design load"
For long staples (2") that resulted in 1 1/4" or more staple engagement, fastener withdrawal did not occur. The staples remained in the receiving member and "mushed over / pulled through" the plywood
For shorter staples, that resulted in less than 1" staple engage, staple withdrawal occurred and peak loads were lower.
Staple orientation seemed to have an effect on deflection at peak strength but not peak strength.
The reason I like staples is that they don't damage the receiving member as much as larger nails and (imo) they can approach the behavior of factory installed truss plates better than nailed connections.
People tend to focus on strength of a connection but timber connections have both strength and stiffness characteristics and depending on the situation, one can be more important than the other.
cheers Bob
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wrote:

Bob:
Thanks,
The problem is I don't have a compressor to drive the palm nailer anyways, so either way I think I need to spend some money on something to make the job easier. I have three areas in the attic to use this on, so it will help me greatly if this is a time and elbow grease saver. I deliberately waited till winter time to do this project because summer time in Miami up in the attic at 105 degrees in an awkward position is not fun, further more I recently strained my back so that also made it harder for me to have the maximum effect on hammering.
Looking further ahead on my fasteners need in my never ending remodeling job, I am going to subcontract the sheet rock and flooring, so I don't need to worry about that myself. I will need to repair some 1/2" thick wood soffit ceiling panels "Ply-Bead" that I need to either nail or staple, I have 7 rooms of baseboards and interior door trims which I will do myself (finish nailers), and quite a few furring strips and panels I need to attach to concrete walls (to attach cabinets and shelving and industrial lighting), so perhaps if I look ahead if might pay for me to invest in a good compressor and some air tools. I would rather get fewer good quality tools then a bunch of one off items.
Is there an air tool that would do finish nailing, structural nailing, and also punch wood into concrete?
MC
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I haven't hired a pro for anything but autowork in 30 years. Yet it was just a couple years ago that I bought my [first] compressor. Shaking my head now when I think of how much I could have used it over the years.
I have a cheap Harbor freight job- 10gallons, rated 2HP- about $120 on sale. It is a little slow for grinding, die cutting and sandblasting. But I've nailed, painted, blown things clean, etc to my hearts content.

For nailers I have a Porter Cable FR350 framer that drives 3 1/2" full headed nails; a Bostitch finish nailer that drives 1" to 2" finish nails; and a couple $10 brad nailers and staplers from Harbor Freight.
Driving finish nails and not having to go back and set them is a real pleasure. The brad nailers are pretty handy, too. I don't do a lot of framing but if I did I can see where the framer would be a big timesaver. For me it just saves my elbow joints.
For attaching framing lumber to concrete I like Tapcons. There is a T-nailer that drives hardened nails, but I've never seen one at work.
Jim
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wrote:

Ditto
Ditto

and more ditto.

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I have seen a tool someone used to attach PT 1x form work to concrete walls. It drives a nail into the wood and concrete and the nail has a plastic orange gear looking like tail attached to it. I wonder what that tool is, is it a nailer?
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On Fri, 26 Dec 2008 11:22:25 -0500, "MiamiCuse"

Sounds like a Ramset- http://constructionfastening.com/RamsetT3SStool.html?gclid=CJ2B6KXm3pcCFQMnGgodohebDg [cool video]
Jim
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wrote:

You can buy: Ramset 22 Caliber Single Shot Trigger Activated Powder Actuated Tool - RS22 * Liquid Nails and a Ramset will do the job. Is this just block walls or a solid poured wall?
HD had a hammer activated one for 20 bucks or so.
* http://www.hechinger.com/hardware/online/ramset-rs22
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wrote:

Block wall in most areas and solid poured walls in a few other locations. Yes I think it is a ramset. For some reason I have always assumed it's an air tool of some sort. So I can go with gas tools or air tools?
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On Sat, 27 Dec 2008 10:21:25 -0500, "MiamiCuse"

Each wall may require a different load (color). Block and a solid wall loads are different.
Ramset is gun-powder/rim fire shot. A good load/fastener will penetrate.
Use butyl caulk and few shots fired the wood stay on the wall.
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Probably a .22 caliber powered driver, cheap, and does concrete.
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wrote:

Jim thanks.
After browsing around the internet trying to get educated...I came across this product.
http://www.senco.com/pdf/spec_sheets/framepro651_ss.pdf
says it will do framing, trusses, decks, and drive into concrete. So except for finish nailing, it will serve all my needs from framing, to reinforcing existing studs, to attic truss and framing repair, to attaching furring strips to concrete walls...I think.
then all I need is a finish nailer for baseboards and trim later.
Thoughts?
MC
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MiamiCuse wrote:

1. You've got to use special (clipped head) nails. I'm not sure you can zip down to HD and pick up a pack. 2. Framing nailers are the 12-guage shotguns of the nailer world. They are POWERFUL devices and require eye and ear protection, a STRONG right arm (they're heavy), and a bulletproof vest (groin protection encouraged). 3. For baseboards and trim you'll want a BRAD nailer. It'll shoot up to a 2" brad easily. I got one for $20 from Harbor Freight and couldn't be more pleased.
One difference between a framing nailer and a plam nailer is this: The framing nailer goes "POW!" and with the release of energy equivalent to 1/8th of a stick of dynamite throws a 3" piece of steel into a hunk of lumber. A palm nailer goes tappity-tap-tap-tap (like a hammer) until the same result is achieved.
For handyman stuff around the house, I'd start with a palm nailer.
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Good tool. I've used a Senco 365 framer for years...indispensible. Before you buy a clipped head tool though, check with your building code people. Some high wind communities do not allow them. Pros like the clipped heads because you don't run out of 'bullets' as often. Full head nails naturally are a bit better at holding things together, and for the typical DIYer, reloading is seldom an issue. Senco nails are a top grade product. With the variety they have available you can spend more than you think stocking the precise fastener you prefer for a project. Remember not to use the nailer to draw pieces together. Clamp first, then nail. HTH.
Joe
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-snip-

Senco is a good name--- but I'd be sure I don't always have to go to the internet for nails. I didn't even know they made anything but the gas nailers. Home Depot carries those around here. My brother in law has one and it is the only place that sells the nails locally-- and they never have the size he wants.
Second Joe's comment to be sure your local codes allow snipped heads.
And second Heybub's that framing nailers are the "12 ga shotgun"-- they are heavy, loud and kick like heck.
I think I'd also check to be sure it will nail fir strips to concrete walls. Cool if it does- but they don't seem to bragging much on it in the manual.
Jim
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The New Craftman nailer tool is a Battery operated nailer, very small, But a cheap Remington gun nail driver is quicker and a heavy duty tool, and you will get a bang out of work. The Craftsman will only give you a buzz.
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wrote:

I heard that the remington gun nailer is very loud (almost like a gun shot) is that true?
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MiamiCuse wrote:

They *are* gun shots. A 22 cartridge. How loud depends on the load...more powder = more noise. It also = more driving force and therin lies the problem...selecting the correct load for the work at hand. Too low and the nail won't penetrate fully; too high and you may well wind up with the nail driven completely through a board. One can't use the same load to attach a piece of soft wood to concrete block that one would use to attach it to concrete. Concrete varies in hardness too. Sometimes from spot to spot.
--

dadiOH
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wrote:

My guess is about like a fire cracker or a bull whip being cracked. Use a good set of ear muff protection and safety glasses.

Fastening to steel is very loud (imo).
video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MD-yAjSPgwU

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wrote:

Yep. The "loads" are .22 cal shells.
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MiamiCuse wrote:

Rub the hammer head's striking surface on concrete every once in a while to replace the "polished" surface with slight roughness. (That's what I was taught by a carpenter, about 50 years ago.)
Or, get a hammer with a "waffle marked" striking surface.
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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