How to properly make a RG6 connector?

OK I tried to do a few and I just can't seem to follow the instructions 100%. The part to pull back the braided part is really hard to do, most time I end up getting the metal part into a beard like pattern. Then peeling off the foil part from the white part is almost impossible to do, especially if you are cramped in the attic and there is insulation and hot and humid you are using a flash light to do this. Any tips? Is there a good stip tool for RG6? I have the crimp tool already but have trouble striping like the diagrams.
MC
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Lowes and HomeDepot have decent RG-6 stripping tools. The cost around $25 and do a very good job.
Check it out here:
http://tinyurl.com/al3cr
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On Thu, 10 Nov 2005 23:03:48 -0500, "miamicuse"

You might want to mention which connector you're using. There is a difference between the way you prepare the cable for "F", PL259, "N", BNC as well as soldered or crimp. If you're just looking for a stripper, you can get them at the big box stores, or from Milestek (www.milestek.com).
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Larry
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I am using F connectors for coax cable feed.
Thanks,
MC
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Do these strippers strip all layers at different lengths at the same time or do you have to stip one layer at a time and adjust it? For example this one:
http://www.milestek.com/shop/product.asp?id@%2011412&cid=&kwd=&l=&p or
http://www.buy.com/prod/Steren_204_205_Coax_Cable_2_Blade_Stripper_for_RG58_59_62_6_6_Quad/q/loc/111/90135334.html
and are strippers for crimp style F connectors the same as strippers for compression style connectors?
Thanks,
MC
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Lowes has a compression tool made by Zenith that is only 12.00. I have not used that particular one but I imagine it would work fine for your needs.
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wrote (with possible editing):

Yes, it does and that one works fine for F connectors.

Usually.

You're welcome!
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Larry
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miamicuse wrote:

It looks like you are not doing it right. You do not need to peel the foil off of the center insulation core. As long as you are using the right connectors (RG59 vs RG6), you should be able to stick it in without peeling the foil, so double-check your entire procedure.
Also, any decent home improvement store like Home depot will carry rotary coax strippers that will strip your cable to length. Also, the compression-type connectors seem like even better way to go than crimp (tighter, more reliable). So, if you are willing to invest into tools, get a compression tool instead of the crimper. You will also need compression-type connectors, obviously.
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I looked up the compression tools, they seem to be pretty expensive (like $80). I have a maximum of six or eight connectors to make for my project, and I want to do it right and nice. If I invest in a strip and a compression tool it will be $100 for six connectors. Is there a more reasonably priced tool or are these tools available for rental?'
MC
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On 11 Nov 2005 13:32:32 -0500, info_at_equity-loan_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (equity-loan.info) wrote (with possible editing):

Well, I don't know if they are any more reliable, but they do cost more and T & B are the best.
Also, there are two styles types of compression fittings. One kind uses a ring which is either attached or separate. Compression occurs in the shape of an "O" with two little ears where the excess metal goes. The other uses a hex crimper which forms a hexagon on the back section. Those always seem to be one piece. If you compress a one piece connector, the most common mistake is to try to compress too far forward on the connector. The front section is a fairly rigid (thick) metal and won't compress. Only the rear part compresses, so if you try to compress too far forward, you will distort the shape and it will be hard to screw the connector onto the barrel.
Probably more than you'll ever need to know about them...!
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Larry
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