How to print & frame a roughly 5'x10' google satellite view on a wall

Page 2 of 2  


There are many "hacker's apps" that will download and re-assemble Google Earth data at the highest available resolution for the region wanted. Much will depend on how much area you want to capture, and what resolution is available for that area. Urban areas are available at a higher density resolution because that satellite imagery is used for tax assessors who use the imagery to watch for building violations and improvements (its main use). There is no "one resolution only" when it comes to Google Earth data available, nor is there a limit to that resolution (up to the government allowed publicly-available limit)--the available resolution being area, finance-base, and population density dependent.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/19/2010 4:22 PM, Dr Rig wrote:

Doing so may very well be a copyright violation. Check with Google.
--
Peter

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/19/2010 10:01 PM, peter wrote:

A mosaic of adjacent sections, or a blowup of ONE map? I think you will be disappointed by the resolution in either case. USCGS (or was it NASA?) used to have an online portal for ordering hi-rez sat photos- don't remember if you could order them as a file or not, that could be printed on a industrial plotter like at Kinko's. Online map sites are geared toward looking at them on a small monitor.
I know a lot of the map sites do watermark their images, and do something so you can't save the image other than by screen-scraping.
I love aerial and satt photos- I have one on my office wall of the half-mile square surrounding my office, but it is only 10x10 or so. I wish some site had OLD satt images available, like from when they first started taking them. Some company a few years ago was selling old Russian images of CONUS.
As to the mundane framing part- any sign shop can put it on the foam backer like they use in stores and at trade shows. Surface is durable enough that you don't need plastic cover, which would cost a fortune in any case.
Try Googling 'aerial images' and your zip code- there may be more sources than you think.
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Have you considered going the old-fashioned route and using a fairly powerful slide projector? The bottom line could prove to be less expensive over time. The many advantages are obvious. Slides are cheap, easy to replace, modify and update. You need nothing on your display wall but specialized paint, or better yet a 5' x 10', or even better yet 6' x 12', projection screen. For example, see http://www.bigpicturebigsound.com/projector-screen-1.shtml . Also google projection screens large OR giant OR wall OR white OR paint
The biggest advantage of all is, what if you want to display something else? Another big advantage is that you can mount the slide projector just above the elevation of anyone walking or standing in the room. Google maps, and practically all other on-line sources of maps, satellite images, etc., are updated from time to time, depending on the areas which are being mapped and imaged. No matter what mosaic of images you may grab from Google, they will become obsolete before long. So why photograph what you can show updated?
You could bypass any slideshow options and go to direct Internet feeds projected onto the screen/wall. That would be my preference, the live feed. For example, I would love to see Da Vinci's Mona Lisa projected onto my main living room wall via live HD camera + audio feed from the Louvre, live and in high definition. That should be free to the world.
--
Joe



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A US decorator projected the Sistine Chapel onto his living room wall, illustrated in C. Ray Smith's Supermannerism: New Attitudes in Post- Modern Architecture (Dutton 1977).
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.digitalglobe.com /
But, you might really want an aerial photograph...
http://www2.aerogrid.net /
http://nationalmap.gov/gio/viewonline.html -----
- gpsman
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
: I have a wall that I want to cover with roughly a 5 foot by 10 foot : "picture" frame of a google satellite view of the surrounding area. : : Any idea how to accomplish the various technical parts? : - For the 'frame', I'm thinking of making it out of pine : - For the 'glass', I'm wondering how big a sheet of thin plastic I can buy : - For the 'printing', I'm not sure, but maybe Kinkos can print it?
You can print it yourself if you have access to a decent inkjet plotter. We have one at work that takes four-foot rolls of paper, and they make them for rolls even wider than that. The downside is that such large pictures are very unwieldy. Framing and hanging are the hard part unless, as someone suggested, you glue it up like wallpaper.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert Coe wrote:

Ever seen a wet inkjet print? I would not advise to use it as walpaper. That would turn into a diaster. There is hoever doublesided tape, in quite wide rolls, that might do it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@ppllaanneett.nnll says...

Uh, wide carriage inkjets are used to produce vehicle wraps, which have no problem getting wet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'd use a spray adhesive like the 3M stuff available all over the place. it would take several cans to do a wall.

Tekronix made an engineering-size printer that could make large prints(like blueprints),Xerox bought that division,and still makes them,IIRC. It uses thermal wax "ink",makes really nice color prints. There are several engineering printers that can make "wallpaper" you could use for your wall photo.
You could also try a place that does billboards.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/19/2010 4:22 PM, Dr Rig wrote:

Just a thought. Use one of the service bureaus and print it on canvas. You can stretch that on any frame you want. The length can be very long, the widths will vary by the printer. They will ship it rolled up.
I had some very large prints done, and they wound up coming out of China. (1/4 Kinkos price) Printed on HP Dreamjet and coated. Quality is very good. No need for glazing.
Jeff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jeff Thies wrote:

That would be good. Just stretch it over a wood frame allowing for some edge to wrap around and it would be a very simple elegant presentation.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/21/2010 3:17 PM, Paul Furman wrote:

They look good. And you can buy the stretcher bars widely.
Probably not the cheapest, but the first I ran across:
http://www.wholesaleartsframes.com/categories/Giclee-Printing-On-Canvas/1-Piece /
$400 for the a 60" x 120" 2 1/2" deep frame. The way that works is they stretch and staple it on the stretcher bars and ship it to you rolled up. You pop in the the side bars to the top and bottom and hang it.
The print alone there is $200 without the stretcher bars, so there is a big premium for stretching. I'd probably do it myself and save $$$.
IMHO, it is crazy to do this any other way. (ie, framed and glazed)
Just remembered where I had mine done:
http://www.updone.com /
They print up to 60" x 360".
Definitely assemble on site. Easy, peasy.
Jeff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 21 Nov 2010 14:50:52 -0500, Jeff Thies wrote:

Before embarking on making, or getting something made I'd check that it will be physically possible to get a 5 x 10 rigid sheet around any corners, up any stairs and through any doors. You may find that the restrictions on getting it in mean the display will have to be made or at least assembled in-situ.
--
http://thisreallyismyhost.99k.org/132010111113086670.php

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.