How to plug sliding door gap?

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Basically my *points* are the differences between sliders and open in/ out doors and how they might impact an individual's lifestyle.
You don't like your slider? Fine, remove it.
I don't want the door that connects my family room to my deck to swing open in either direction for all the reasons I mentioned above. Having to rearrange either my family room or limit my deck space to accommodate a swinging door is far from "nit picking".
Like I said, to each his own.

Again, that all depends on the amount of snow and how much stress you want to put on the door. As I stated earlier, the words you used were "quite a pushing experience". That tells me that were abnormally high stresses put on the frame and hinges. That's simply not something I would want to subject my expensive door to.
But again, to each his own. If you're OK with that, that's fine. Really.

Oh come, is a slider a poorer invention than these?
http://tinyurl.com/WorseThanSliders

Happy Holidays!
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On Thu, 23 Dec 2010 14:44:32 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

A Jalousie window has to be the worst!!!
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in wrote

o gawd, I have them,too! 4 Sets in the enclosed porch. I only opened the 1 set last year and had a difficult time to close them this fall. There is a full length screen on the inside framed in wood. There is a small slot to try and reach in to press on the lever for the windows. I had to get a very long screwdriver and tapped with a hammer. The windows closed a bit. Then I went outside and gently pressed down each window as far as I could. That's the way they have to stay until spring. I't too darned cold and I'd probably break something. p.s. I have a sliding door,too. ack! L.
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On Thu 23 Dec 2010 11:31:34p, Lisa BB. told us...

The key to properly operating jalousies is maintenance. My parents owned a home for many years that had a 32' x 20' back porch with 6' tall jalousies lining three walls. My dad lubricated and operated the mechanisms on a regular schedule and there was never a problem. They cranked open and closed tightly with minimal effort. Jalousies are not a type of window to be ignored for months or years on end.
--

~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~
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wrote

These windows are from 1950s, as well as the house. The previous people didn't maintain very much. The framed screens are nailed to the wall. And varnished the same as the walls. Our windows look about 6 feet also. There is almost no way to get at the mechanisms. They don't crank. There is a lever that is suppoed to go up or down. As I said, I have to wait for the spring to get the levers working right. It's about 20 degress all the time and too cold to play around with glass.
I found this picture:
http://i01.i.aliimg.com/photo/v0/233101507/glass_jalousie_window.jpg
The nailed on framed screens only leave a small slot opening for us to operate the lever. However, you can hardly get a grip on the lever. The lever isn't long enough to extend into the room. That's why I needed the long screwdriver. My fingers could hardly get into the slot. All I can do is pinch the end of the lever with my finger tips. L.
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On Fri 24 Dec 2010 01:07:39a, Lisa BB. told us...

You inherited an unfortunate situation that someone else created, and I undestand your dilemma. Quite unlike my parents' situation. This has been such a long thread that I probably missed it, but are your windows on a porch or windows to your home itself?
--

~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~
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On 24 Dec 2010 07:29:13 GMT, Wayne Boatwright

My point was, if you think a decent sliding door is a "hole in the wall" heat-wize and air-leak-wize, it cannot compare to even the BEST jalousie style window.
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On Fri 24 Dec 2010 12:53:32p, told us...

I would never recommend jalousies as windows into a heated or air condition space, nor would I particularly want sliders for the same. However, jalousies can be a very nice window for a 2-3 season porch.
--

~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~
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wrote:

Mine do, modulo the width of the hinge and door knob. Ours have sidelights the width of the doors, so basically the whole wall is window. There's nothing to see but the screened in porch, though. It's a Southern exposure so does let a lot of light in and the porch keeps the direct sun out of the great room in the Summer (rather important in Alabama).

I never had any real problems cleaning the tracks in previous houses. It took a little work, but no biggie. I broke a wheel once, but I don't really remember replacing it (it was over 20 years ago). If I had a slider again I'd get a good wood one, though. Aluminum doors in Vermont was a very bad idea.

Sure. I could go either way, though now having French doors, I do prefer them.
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On Mon, 20 Dec 2010 20:42:19 -0800 (PST), Harry K

There as a cheap sliding door in our house when we bought it 29 years ago - it was 8 years old and a real peice of trash. It's the first repair we did to the house the following summer - vinyl clad wood door - kinda like a golf ball. It has been totally trouble free for 27 or 28 years, and seals nice and tight. Never any leakage problems, even with the nasty winters we sometimes get here in south/central Ontario. Being on the south side we get some solar heating in the winter, and being shaded by a big maple, it does not overheat in the summer.
No way I'd ever replace it with french doors (my experience is they generally don't seal any better, if as well) or get rid of them in any other way.
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I made the promise to myself and SWMBO to replace it as I was kneeling there digging the snow out of the track at about 15 degrees with a blizzard going. Dogs want out, open door, shut door and it shoves a plug up against the jamb. Get out hair dryer, screwdriver and dig away while gtting snow blown down my back. Repeat as long as the wind is blowing snow around every few times the dogs go out.
Harry K
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When my house was built, it had an aluminum framed slider that froze closed and I has similar issues. Metal framed doors a dumb north of Atlanta. When it came replacement time, I considered French doors, but at 8', it was not a good idea. I chose a Pella slider and could not be happier. It has never stuck or froze or needed track cleaning in the snow. We use this door as our main entrance also so it gets a lot of use.
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On Mon, 20 Dec 2010 06:44:50 -0800 (PST), Name Classified

I looked around on the net expecting to find ready-made vertical seals for sliding doors. No luck. Don't know why. It's not rocket science. You could make your own by gluing hollow rubber seals or even foam to beveled wood strips. Like this, top view where the left and right sides are the leaking door faces when closed.
!\\!
Another option is vertical cleats on both doors, one with hollow rubber or foam weatherstripping on it to press against the bare cleat. The rails are plenty wide to accommodate them. You just need to watch the depth. Sort of like this, top view, not quite closed.
!__! __ ! !
No reason sliding doors can't be well sealed on the vertical. It's the top and bottom where it has to be loose to move well. There you might as well stick rags in when you need them.
--Vic
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On Mon, 20 Dec 2010 13:54:35 -0600, Vic Smith

An interlocking fin seal is best, and what MANY doors have (had) from the factory
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Name Classified wrote:

In addition to the other suggestions, consider heavy, full-length, drapes.
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On 12/20/2010 3:35 PM, HeyBub wrote:

The heavy drapes will work well if you staple them to the wall with no air leaks, otherwise any savings is so small it's not worth the bother The heavy drapes just create a downward convection current with all the cold air coming out the bottom and your warm air going in the top.
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All I can think of is some weather stripping that can be attached so that it's on the outside edge and won't hinder the closing. Maybe something like the stuff that is glued to refrigerators?? It's good to get it blocked because mice possibly will come thru there. I had a problem with the sliding screen in the nice weather. I wasn't sure, but I thought a mouse squeezed between the screen and the stationary side of the slider. I found some "thin padding" in the store and glued it to the inside edge near the bottom. It was easy with the screen since it can be taken out.
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You've had lots of suggestions for weather stripping, but I gotta ask this:
How did the gap get there?
If it's been there since installation, it was a piss poor installation.
If it has appeared over time, then either the door is warping or your house has some serious settling issues.
A gap that big needs the root cause determined and fixed, not just stuffed with weather stripping.
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