How to overcome response delay of less than 1 second.

I need a real simple method to solve this problem.
How to extend the transmission time of a wireless doorbell transmitter, from 1/2 second to 1 second.
My house was built with a doorbell in the front hall. Because I always listen to the radio or tv, I could not hear the bell in the basement or the second floor. I put a second bell in the basement, and for the second floor, I put the push-button transmitter for a third (wireless) bell (buzzer) next to the doorbell transformer on the basement ceiling.
For the little 1" x 3" transmitter, I bypassed the pushbutton switch so it's always closed, and in place of the battery, I gave it the rectified output of the doorbell transformer, but only when someone presses the outside doorbell button.
If they hold the button for about a second or more, the buzzer in the 2nd floor hall buzzes, and if I'm on the second floor, I always hear it.
If they let go more quickly, it doesn't buzz.
Maybe I could use the 9 to 12 volts pulsating DC that goes to the transmitter to charge a capacitor, which would then power the transmitter for another second, to make sure the buzzer upstairs buzzes. Any chance that would work? If not, some other simple idea?
Is there a slow release front-door doorbell button?
Last Thursday FEDEX "delivered" an envelope from a bank, but just left it on the stoop, tilted so anyone on the public sidewalk could see its bright red and blue colors and take it. No money inside, but still. I didn't know it was coming and wouldn't know it was missing. I've talked to 2 people at FEDEX and neither will say if Fedex has a position on putting their envelopes in my door slot. The USPS doesn't object to non-mail being put in mail slots.
I also didn't hear the doorbell, but I don't know if he pushed the button quickly or not at all.
A few months ago I was sitting in the kitchen, 10 feet from the door and the doorbell, (and I think it was Fedex) and he neither rang the bell (the first floor bell is instantaneous) or knocked louder than a little child might knock. That time the package was too big for the slot, and he left it and I don't object to that part.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Keying the power to the transmitter might have a side effect. My guess is that the processor in the transmitter is taking its time getting itself initialized and making sure all the internal housekeeping is done before allowing it to belch RF. Such processors also have a feature that will delay initial transmission so that the transmitter will not spew junk when powered up. You may also be charging a few capacitors on power up. I suggest you use it in the manner originally specified by the manufacturer. Apply the power continuously, probably with a battery, and key the pushbutton switch with a relay.
Even so, you might have a slight delay caused by the time necessary to decode the (rolling code) data. I once built a remote bird trap release using various wireless remote controls. Timing had to be quick and perfect to avoid injuring the bird.
I started with a wireless doorbell, which had a built in 1-2 second delay. A spectrum analyzer showed me that the RF was appearing instantly. A scope showed that the delay was built into the logic and was not going to disappear. Next, I tried two different remote controls purchased on eBay. They were somewhat better, but still had about a 500 msec delay. I finally had to make my own two tone analog encoder and decoder, in order to get 100-150 msec response time.
If this is the type of hardware you're using, I think the best bet would be to insert a one-shot circuit (or relay delay if you want to be crude), that produces a 2-3 second output pulse, for a very short input pulse from the push button. That will insure that any length depression of the pushbutton will produce at least a 2-3 second output.
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/05/2014 04:10, micky wrote:

You used to be able to get neat simple "timer" buttons for stairway lights, on for the duration of climbing a flight, but should work for DC. They must have had a piston in a cylinder with a spring return. You pressed down on the button to expel the air from the cylinder, a flap valve closed and then air would probably be admittted along a long capilliary tube , coiled up somewhere inside. Gave timing on of about 1 minute
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"micky" schreef in bericht
I need a real simple method to solve this problem.
How to extend the transmission time of a wireless doorbell transmitter, from 1/2 second to 1 second.
My house was built with a doorbell in the front hall. Because I always listen to the radio or tv, I could not hear the bell in the basement or the second floor. I put a second bell in the basement, and for the second floor, I put the push-button transmitter for a third (wireless) bell (buzzer) next to the doorbell transformer on the basement ceiling.
For the little 1" x 3" transmitter, I bypassed the pushbutton switch so it's always closed, and in place of the battery, I gave it the rectified output of the doorbell transformer, but only when someone presses the outside doorbell button.
If they hold the button for about a second or more, the buzzer in the 2nd floor hall buzzes, and if I'm on the second floor, I always hear it.
If they let go more quickly, it doesn't buzz.
Maybe I could use the 9 to 12 volts pulsating DC that goes to the transmitter to charge a capacitor, which would then power the transmitter for another second, to make sure the buzzer upstairs buzzes. Any chance that would work? If not, some other simple idea?
Is there a slow release front-door doorbell button?
Last Thursday FEDEX "delivered" an envelope from a bank, but just left it on the stoop, tilted so anyone on the public sidewalk could see its bright red and blue colors and take it. No money inside, but still. I didn't know it was coming and wouldn't know it was missing. I've talked to 2 people at FEDEX and neither will say if Fedex has a position on putting their envelopes in my door slot. The USPS doesn't object to non-mail being put in mail slots.
I also didn't hear the doorbell, but I don't know if he pushed the button quickly or not at all.
A few months ago I was sitting in the kitchen, 10 feet from the door and the doorbell, (and I think it was Fedex) and he neither rang the bell (the first floor bell is instantaneous) or knocked louder than a little child might knock. That time the package was too big for the slot, and he left it and I don't object to that part.
***
The transmitter takes its time to power up which will be a substantial part of the delay. So what's the delay if you keep the wireless powered up and you use the original pushbutton contacts? How long that pushbutton need to be pressed to activate the remote doorbell? If that time is not too long, it may be sufficient to put a relay parallel to the original doorbell which activates the remote. Otherwise you will need some monostable to stretch the pushbutton pulse. Just make sure that the powersupply of the original doorbell is able to keep the wireless standby. When idle the load should be neglectible but some doorbell tranformers are nevertheless not able to provide this minimal power continuously.
petrus bitbyter
petrus bitbyter
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A doorbell that rings for three days wouldn't solve that problem. You ca't assume with FedEx or UPS, nor blame them, UNLESS you discuss with them first.
I had a similar situation Fedex dropped off a large TV monitor without notifying me. As I found out much later, about 20 minutes after that delivery, UPS excersized a pickup will call tag, took away the newly delivered package, assuming that sealed box was the one to go back! All without either delivery people telling me - I found out about a week later when I called to find out where package was.
I called FedEx, that connected me to the local dispatch number [the employee gave me their local number in case I need to call them directly] however, I explained to them the problem of leaving a delivery without notification and WHERE to leave it, they wrote a note for our dispatch mgr AND talked to the drivers. Did the same with UPS. After that, any delivery is tucked into a more secure location that can't be seen from the street, and any activity they ring the door bell AND gently rap on the door for me.
PS you can also arrange [if you want] to have ALL packages left including the posting of a separate notification by signing a thingy for them. I used to live in such a large house that they had sufficient time to ring the bell, write out a tag to tell me they attempted delivery, and then just be leaving as I would get to the door. Having them leave everything solved that problem!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Here in US, these transmitters are controlled by FCC limitations applied to 'intentional transmitters'
From memory and my understanding, they rarely are expected to transmit so they give out a burst of RF, and therein lies why they are allowed to operate. That burst is large compared to what things like radio controllers are allowed to transmit BECAUSE they aren't expected to operate very often. And sometimes to insure not very often means a single burst, end. or short series, end.
So, the OP may need not a HOLD KEY DOWN function at the transmitter, but a REPEAT KEY FUNCTION. as in, hitting the button over and over for a long period of time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Argh. Do they still make such timers? I used to use Agastat brand pneumatic timers back in the 1960's. Agastat is now TE Connectivity: <http://www.te.com/en/home.html It looks like they still make pneumatic timers: <http://www.te.com/catalog/bin/TE.Connect?C 003&MAT&P3197&U=&BML576,16354&LG=1> Amazing. Thanks for the memory jog.
Also, if you're into retro timers, there's also the thermal time delay relay, usually built inside a vacuum tube envelope. <
http://diyaudioprojects.com/Tubes/KT88-Push-Pull-Tube-Amp/6NO30-Thermal-Delay-Relay-Vacuum-Tube.jpg
<http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=6n030+delay While these have both been replaced by the 555 timer and digital equivalents, they're still fun to play with. <
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ku91Yg2lJmk

--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Good idea. Googling for "pneumatic push button", I find: <http://www.alarmcontrols.com/html/our_product.asp?action=view&ID (> all of which I think will work. They also have electronic versions, but I think pneumatic is more cool.
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Available on eBay: <http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=pneumatic+push+to+exit
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
micky wrote:

to hold enough charge to keep the transmitter running long enough to sound the remote buzzer. It depends on how much current the transmitter takes, but it shouldn't be all that much.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Go to Harbor Freight and get a driveway sensor system: sees people, etc, and transmits to the receiver. Receiver sounds off (two levels) and blinks. Easy to extend since both non-contact sound and light. Place the sender at the door positioned so it see only folks at the entry. I have an outdoor light fixture that works as a holder up where no one notices until too late. Put the receiver where you can hear it. The receiver can be run from a wall wart (not provided) or batts. Th Sender runs on a 9v batt. At least the ones I have do. There is a newer model so check it out first. The sender with 9v batt lasts 9 months. I have one in my living room and receiver in the bedroom. The sender gets walked through a dozen or more times a day and still gives me excellent batt life. I have several units all on the same channel so multiple transmitters and one receiver. No failures after 5 years use. Only regret is that the receiver does not have different selectable sounds so a channel announcing can be ID-ed by sound.
No button required to be pushed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
@bigfoot.com says...

The problem is simple, assuming you did supply it with a rectified output as you say? Put a cap on the rectified side, a large one that can hold a charge long enough to get that thing to ding!
Of course, one could also use a 555 timer, use the trigger in (grd) to activate, a RC from the output to the threshold to turn it off.
Jamie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.