How to open this cleanout?

Page 2 of 2  
A few questions:
If indeed that is your cleanout, it has to sit lower( sloped downward) than the pipe that leaves your house. That will give you an idea how deep in the ground it is. When the last visible pipe leaves your house, where is it in relation to the floor? Is it a foot below ground, above ground? And also how far away is the cleanout and the pipe that leaves the house?
If you cannot get the cleanout opened, is there a way to put in a cleanout in the pipe leaving the house so you don't have to go through that trouble with the concrete?
Do you have any problems now that you must get it opened? If not, I would just leave it for now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks.
Unfortunately, your questions are part of what I am trying to determine.
The house is old, build in 1972, and the city has no old plans that survived. They microfilmed all paper plans in the 90s to save space, then the bugs ate all the microfilms. So no old record to go back to.
Due to the unique design of the house, there are multiple lines that exit the house. The have already identified and located one of them which is on the other side of the house. I do know these two merge further downstream.
This line I *believe* exits the house under the front door entrance, which consists of a concrete stairway three steps up to the landing areas. This stepped area then is directly connected to the concrete driveway. I believe this line goes under the stairway and landing areas then the driveway. There is no visible exit point elsewhere (I have dugged).
I had someone come by to snake the line and I sort of located it heading in the direction of the stairway by listening to the spinning noise of the snake head from above, but it muffed as it gets deeper. The plumber ran 100' of line but I don't know where it went. I wanted to open the cleanout on the exit end and look down, and possibly snake from there to the city. I also want to send a video down and see the conditon.
The entire exercise is to assess the condition of my cast iron line and determine if I need repair, or total replacement.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Why not hire a company to run a transponder out of your various drain lines then the lines can be located for sure

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is you house similiar to the others in the neighborhood? Perhaps you can compare how your neighbor's houses are built.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not the same. My house was custom built by an architect for himself many years ago and he is no longer around.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The one with the grass tuff in it looks like the remnants of a basketball post that was filled with concrete. Very possible that before the driveway was there it was used to play basketball.
On Sat, 25 Jul 2009 17:36:10 -0400, "MiamiCuse"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, I have this at the end of my driveway about 6ft from the street and it's midway across the width. I don't know what it is. All I can say is that the water meter is in an underground box with a flip top about 10 ft away on the side of the driveway.
http://tinypic.com/r/fncnrr/3
I'm curious what it is.
And I wonder if yours looked like this at one time. The wrench size for it would be 2-1/8".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.