How to meet the California law requiring carbon monoxide detectors in (almost) every home by July 1st 2011

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California law requires a carbon monoxide detector in every home (essentially) as of July 1st.
Since I need to get a few, do you guys recommend any particular CO detector?
I'm planning on putting one in each bedroom; but I'm not sure if they belong in the garage or kitchen.
Any recommendations?
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Check the local code. I doubt the garage is needed as there could be many false alarms. Why each bedroom? CO only comes from a couple of sources. I have mine in the hallway, just outside the bedrooms as the CO has to travel that way to get to them. A second one is about 12' away from the heater, the main source of CO.
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On 6/20/2011 5:38 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I agree with check the code.
Battery? Hardwired? Plug-in? Interconnect with fire alarms?
I also agree that hallways outside the bedrooms are likely where they would be installed.
If you want to be code compliant you need to know what the code requires.
--
bud--


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Decide whether you want a combined CO and smoke alarm and whether you want stand-alone or interconnected (as in if the battery is low in 1 - even hardwired ones need a battery - all of them start beeping). Then price them too.
The ones consumerreports.com recommend First Alert CO615 Type: Stand-Alone Models Price as tested: $40
And First Alert OneLInk SCO501CN Type: Interconnected Models Price as tested: $70
CO detectors have a rather limited life span. According to CU, CO detectors need to be replaced every 5 years. That adds to the expense.
--
Best regards
Han
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SF Man wrote:

Think canary.
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This news is by itself interesting, but may be incomplete: in Ontario, Canada, the current requirement (since the 1980s) is for smoke detectors, not CO1 detectors (which appeared on the market not much later -- but are increasingly popular.)
Are few CA households all-electric, heating and cooking solely with electricity (not oil or gas)? All-electric houses (like mine) are unlikely to generate CO1, whatever goes wrong: if a fire started, modern smoke detectors seem to offer the best warning. (Mind you, sources of open fire, e.g. wood stoves or fireplaces, are prudently supplied with a CO1 detector.)
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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On 6/20/2011 3:17 AM, SF Man wrote:

you really only need one. outside the bedrooms in the hall. Maybe two if you have a two story house.
--
Steve Barker
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I'd check with your local fire dept. I bought one recently and it was useless. Always gave the same reading, even when put in a propane oven. Find out where you can have one tested, to make sure it actually works. Again, I'd suggest the fire dept. They could at least direct you.
Another thing, and this applies to both CO and smoke alarms. Get an AC powered device. Not because they are more reliable or dectect any better, but they have an honest-ta-gawd horn/buzzer/klaxon. There's no chance of not hearing my Sears AC smoke alarm. That sucker will flat blow yer ass clean outta bed! ;)
nb
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What reading was that? If it wasn't zero, then that's a problem, but if it was zero, then that's normal. A gas oven should not be expected to contain CO unless you had contrived to starve the flame of oxygen. Heck, my 11 year old car tests zero for CO on its periodic emissions testing. CO should normally be pretty rare anywhere in living quarters.
CO detector test kits are available, they have little breakable ampules of the gas, you put the ampule and the detector in a ziplock bag and break the ampule within the bag. Look on the shelves where the detectors are sold or with all the other test kits for stuff we never used to be scared of.

I have not seen a battery-only CO (or gas) detector, I presume because they inherently use more power than can be supplied by a battery with a practical replacement interval (smoke detectors basically just need a bias voltage). But the ones I've seen have battery backup.
I have not found a smoke, gas or CO detector that I'd fault for having too quiet an alarm. In fact I'm convinced that most of them are so loud that they interfere with calm, correct response, and with communication, in an actual emergency. Mebbe they ought to have a brief ultraloud initial alarm that ramps down a few dB lower 10 or 15 seconds...wonder if I can patent that.
As for placement, since the OP's motivation is to follow the law, then the law probably specifies where to put them. Of course it may say "per manufacturer's instructions". The CO detectors I've bought have instructions that if there's only one in the house, it should go in the vicinity of the bedrooms. There have been other threads on this group about how CO disperses; I think the bottom line is that it spreads pretty much uniformly (or failing that, unpredictably) in air so the detectors are best located near the people that they're protecting.
Chip C Toronto
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house I have for sale and to comply with the new April 1st code of one on every floor.
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Smitty Two wrote:

"California homeowners will be required to install carbon monoxide detectors starting in July 2011 under a bill signed Friday by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger that is aimed at preventing deaths and injuries caused by poisoning from the odorless, colorless gas.
"Up to 40 California residents die each year from carbon monoxide poisoning, according to state Sen. Alan Lowenthal (D-Long Beach), whose legislation was signed by the governor. "
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2010/05/new-state-law-requires-carbon-monoxide-detectors-in-homes-beginning-next-summer.html
Let's do some math: There are about 12 million households in California. Assuming a CO detector costs, on average, fifteen dollars, then $180 million dollars will be extracted from the California economy in an ATTEMPT to save forty lives.
I know maths is hard, but geeze!
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40 lives per year over the 5 year life expectancy CO detectors means 200 lives may be saved by 180 megabucks. That's one life may be saved per expenditure of 9 megabucks.
How much is yours worth? Your spouse's? Your childrens'? Those of your parents? How much would you pay to capture an assassin going after your mother? How much would you sue for if a member of your family ran into a wrongful death?
--
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@donklipstein.com)

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A lot of people don't have the good luck to die from CO poisoning but instead become drooling human vegetables.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide_poisoning
<<This brain damage occurs mainly during the recovery period. This may result in cognitive defects, especially affecting memory and learning, and movement disorders. These disorders are typically related to damage to the cerebral white matter and basal ganglia. Hallmark pathological changes following poisoning are bilateral necrosis of the white matter, globus pallidus, cerebellum, hippocampus and the cerebral cortex. . . . The delayed development of neuropsychiatric impairment is one of the most serious complications of carbon monoxide poisoning. Brain damage is confirmed following MRI or CAT scans. Extensive follow up and supportive treatment is often required for delayed neurological damage. Outcomes are often difficult to predict following poisoning especially patients who have symptoms of cardiac arrest, coma, metabolic acidosis, or have high carboxyhemoglobin levels. One study reported that approximately 30% of people with severe carbon monoxide poisoning will have a fatal outcome.>>
Factor in the cost of lifetime care for seriously brain damaged victims of CO poisoning and the equation changes mightily. Fetuses of pregnant women exposed to CO even minimally fare very poorly.
Ironically, I read that low doses of CO are being investigated for possible health benefits. Meat packers treat meat with CO because it keeps it bright red and much more saleable.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/02/19/AR2006021901101.html
FDA Is Urged to Ban Carbon-Monoxide-Treated Meat
<<The gas, harmless to health at the levels being used, gives meat a bright pink color that lasts weeks. The hope is that it will save the industry much of the $1 billion it says it loses annually from having to discount or discard meat that is reasonably fresh and perfectly safe but no longer pretty.>>
Food safety advocates claim that the meat stays red, even when thoroughly spoiled, making it harder for consumers to buy meat safely.
-- Bobby G.
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Don Klipstein wrote:

I'd pay all I had. On the other hand, to save your spouse, or the guy who lives on Elm Street, in the last house on the right in Bumfuck, Idaho, I'd pay nothing.
It is really, really foolish to make public policy based on a particular, unique, circumstance.
For the $9 million to save one life, we could test EVERY newborn black child in the country for Sickle-Cell Anemia. We could put CO detector is EVERY elementary school classroom in the state, and so on.
I'm not saying CO detection is fundamentally flawed; I'm saying that for that much money there are hundreds of projects where one could get a bigger bang for the buck.
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bang for the buck.<<<<<
Which is exactly how decisions to spend public money should be made. Unfortunately politicians have perverse incentives and the decision process gets distorted.
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That is the way it is. Worry about the small numbers and forget about the larger ones. I do not know the number of people in California,but over the US there are 30,000 to 50,000 people killed in car accidents each year. Nothing much is done about that.
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All this nanny legislation is driven by the insurance companies looking to create loopholes in payout lawsuits. Didn't have an accurate recently calibrated CO detector? Sorry, we don't hafta pay hospital expenses on yer persistant vegitative state wife. You can believe they are doing it with automobiles, too. Data collection boxes that record how fast you were going when you slammed on the brakes prior to skidding into that light pole. Yer fault! You were speeding. Sorry. Broken airbag when yer head slammed into the windsheild? No money fer you.
nb
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wrote:

As if the insurance companies couldn't make the detectors a requirement for insurance without the law.

Broken airbag meet my lawyers and the automobile company that installed you

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Once inflated airbag not replaced by owner cuz costs $1800!
nb
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wrote:

then it isn't broken but used. and once used it is clearly beyond the pale of the automobile company
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