how to make sure door not twisted in rough opening

Hi everyone. I am putting a prehund door into the rough opening. I want to make sure my door is not twisted in the rough opening. When I say twisted, I mean that one door jamb doesn't stick out further than the other. Is there a special tool to check for this. I will draw a picture below, using J for the door jambs and l for the level. However I don't think this is how to check this. Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks.
J J J J JLLLLJ J J J J
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an adjustable square might be helpfull.
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tack the frame in place, put the door in the frame and look at it.
randy

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My understanding is that ideally each edge of the jamb should line up with the finish surface of the adjoining wall. This is so that the backsides of the door trim will all be in a plane, the plane of the wall. To line up the edge of the jamb with the finish wall surface, put a straightedge on the wall perpendicular to the jamb, overhanging the rough opening just enough so that the jamb can be brought up against the level.
Often the jamb thickness will not exactly match the finish wall thickness. If it is less, pick one side to line the jamb up with, and install an extension jamb to line up the other side. This is just a piece of 1x material cut to the necessary thickness, usually installed with a small reveal, just as door trim is installed with a reveal. If the jamb is wider than the wall, then it is best to cut it down or procure a different jamb.
Not sure what the best strategy is when the wall is not plumb, since the door jamb should be installed plumb, which implies the edge of the jamb can't be aligned with the finish wall for the whole length of the jamb. Perhaps taper the jamb or use a tapered extension jamb?
Hope this helps and answers your question, I'm not sure if I understood it exactly.
Yours, Wayne
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Ideally a plumb wall is great, but lets face it.... Older homes sometimes fall out of being plumb... Not a huge issues if its a little out. Its usually more important that its flush with the wall as much as possible. The interesting this is when wood bends over time. Now the wall was slight bends to it.
When I replace doors and this problem occurs I generally shave down the high spot on the wall with a palm sander. Generally what I am talking about is sanding the sheetrock right by the jam. When I put the molding around the door it hides the sanded part and the molding is flush. You'll never ever see a bow in the wall.
Tom
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If you want to make sure that the surface of the jamb sides and head are all in a single plane, the easiest way is to put a proud finish nail in the four corners. Tie off a dry line to create the diagonals of the jamb (make an x going from top right to bottom left and top left to bottom right. When the strings touch at the center where they cross, the jamb is in plane.
For those who do not know, simply nailing off the jamb to run with the drywall on each side of the opening may not give you a jamb that is in plane. If it is not, the door will gap at the top or bottom of the strike side jamb. The condition can often be disguised with creative installation of door stop often resulting in a door that needs to be pushed a little hard to latch as you warp the door into location.
You probably won't see many carpenters do it this way, but you may see them shim and tack a jamb, hang the door, and modify the plane of the jamb with a heavy hammer to accomplish the same thing that the strings tell only using the door itself to determine plane.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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Eric and Megan Swope wrote:

want to

twisted,
Is
using
is how

I see a several posts trying to re-invent the wheel. The answer, since it is a pre-hung door, is to tack the hinge jamb, shut the door and when it is tight to the stops on all three sides the door is in plane. Tack the other two sides after adjusting them so the gap between door and jamb is the same all the way around. Simple. The problem comes when the wall is not plumb. You may not be able to have the jambs in plane if the wall is far enough out of plumb. There are tricks to fix that (planeing the jamb, planeing the wall, installing off plumb and moving stops etc.).
Harry K
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On Thu, 28 Apr 2005 23:17:27 GMT, "Eric and Megan Swope"

Since you used all those J's, I assume you are building a birdhouse for Blue J's. Bird houses are not all that critical, and if the door is a little twisted the bird wont care.
Jerry
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