How to make room light turn on an additional lamp?

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I have a room with one spot light at the ceiling that is not very bright. Using a bright bulb just light up a spot in the room brighter.
I bought a floor lamp for the room. Is there a way to make the lamp turn on when the ceiling spot light is on?
In other words, flip one switch and turn on both the hardwired ceiling light and a floor lamp.
I can think of an expensive solution using home control system Insteon by installing an insteon light switch and a lamp module. The light switch not only functions as a light switch but can be linked to the lamp module that I can plug in the floor lamp. This cost $100.
Is there a cheaper way?
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On Monday, September 9, 2013 10:05:54 PM UTC-4, bob wrote:

X 10 nwas very affordable the last time I checked, perhaps 5 years ago, helping a realtive
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On Monday, September 9, 2013 9:05:54 PM UTC-5, bob wrote:

floor lamp for the room. Is there a way to make the lamp turn on when the c eiling spot light is on? In other words, flip one switch and turn on both t he hardwired ceiling light and a floor lamp. I can think of an expensive so lution using home control system Insteon by installing an insteon light swi tch and a lamp module. The light switch not only functions as a light switc h but can be linked to the lamp module that I can plug in the floor lamp. T his cost $100. Is there a cheaper way?
Run a wire from the light switch to a regular wall outlet near the floor an d plug the lamp into the outlet. This isn't rocket science.
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Put one of these between the over head lamp and the bulb: http://www.walmart.com/ip/GE-2-Outlet-Polarized-Light-Socket-Adapter-with-Pull-Chain-Ivory/16644758
Run zipcord extensions to the floor lamp. Probably can't do that in commercial applications, but for home use, no one will complain.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/9/2013 10:05 PM, bob wrote:

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On 9/9/2013 9:05 PM, bob wrote:

There's a simple two switch solution: for the floor lamp, add a wireless remote control wall mounted switch alongside the existing light switch. The floor lamp plugs into the receiver, which plugs into the nearest outlet. Then, when you want both lights on, just flip both switches.
The wireless floor switch adhesive-backed, so it mounts on the wall without cutting or drilling. The wireless remote operation means fishing wires through walls.
Example: Westek RFK100LC Wall Mounted Switch and Plug-in Receiver Amazon has it for about thirteen bucks.
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On 9/10/2013 7:33 AM, Moe DeLoughan slapped head and corrected:

<coffee...need coffee...>
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On 09/09/2013 10:05 PM, bob wrote:

Where are you going to put the floor lamp? Near the light switch or on the opposite side of the room?
If on the same wall as/near the light switch, I'd just knock the switch box out of the wall, replace it with a deep double gang box, add another switch, and drop a cable down from there to a new receptacle. (assuming of course that the switch is not a switch leg. If it is you'd have to repull from the ceiling box to the switch with a cable with an extra conductor in it.) If there's already a receptacle there, it might already be fed from the switch box in which case you have two choices - one, just rewire it so that it's switched, or two, pull a new cable between the two with an extra conductor and split the receptacle (might need to replace the boxes for box fill reasons.)
If it's on the other side of the room, then the hardwired way may not be practical unless you have access to the tops of the walls from the attic above.
nate
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On 9/9/2013 9:05 PM, bob wrote:

There are wireless light switches available for applications like yours. ^_^
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
https://tinyurl.com/ocmxbvk
TDD
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TDD,
While looking at the device you linked to, I saw this in the "frequently bought together" section:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
The switch & receptacle device that you linked to says it works for incandescent and fluorescent lights but the "acts like a 3-way switch" device in my link only mentions incandescents. Do you think that's a misprint or is there a valid reason it won't work with fluorescents?
In my case, I have a few 4 ft shop lights plugged into ceiling outlets in my basement which are controlled by a single switch in the kitchen. I'd love to add 3 way functionality (i.e. a switch in the basement) without having to do any rewiring.
What do you think?
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On 9/10/2013 2:44 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I know that there is a problem with some controls which use a solid state device to switch loads instead of a relay which doesn't care what's connected to it as long as the current rating isn't exceeded. Florescent lights (using ballasts) are an inductive load as opposed to a resistive load like incandescent lamps. That could be what determines the suitability of a remote switch for the type of light it will handle. There could also be a problem with CFL's depending on the type of load switching method. Perhaps an Email to the manufacturer could get an answer from their technical support people? ^_^
TDD
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On Tuesday, September 10, 2013 7:47:04 PM UTC-4, The Daring Dufas wrote:

+1
If it just says that it works with incandescents, I would not expect it to work with other than resistive loads. It might, but he needs to check with the manufacturer. As you say, there are issues with other types of loads and driving them with electronic devices. You would not think they would limit their market unnecessarily by saying incandescent if there were not an issue.
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On 9/11/2013 7:41 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

There have even been problems with electronic switching and some dimmers when it comes to LED lighting so everyone should do as I do, (ask questions). When I hear "I don't know", I'll start asking more questions or go looking for the information myself. I can remember making lots of phone calls or perusing publications at the library. Now I can sit here on my butt, which is good because it hurts to walk these days. I love The Internet and wish more folks knew how to use it well. The only problem I can see is that if everyone knew everything I wouldn't get to learn anything new by reading Usenet. ^_^
TDD
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On Wednesday, September 11, 2013 11:57:32 AM UTC-4, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Yes, with LEDs the typical dimmer is usually not compatible. The LEDs use switching type power supplies. The issue there is that traditional Triac type dimmers turn on part into the rising edge of the AC waveform and that interferes with the way the switching power supplies work. They are expecting a slowly continuously rising AC waveform. There are dimmers rated for use with them.
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I called HeathCo this morning. The answer I received was that the ballast in the fluorescents cause issues with the electronics in the 6133 (3 way switch device) but not in the 6136 (switch-receptacle device).
When I asked about the X-10 trick of adding an incandescent bulb to the circuit with the fluorescents, he said that it might absorb some of the induction caused by the ballast but since they can't guarantee it will work, they can't recommend it.
Obviously I'm free to try it if I so choose.
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On Wednesday, September 11, 2013 11:00:15 AM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

The X10 trick of adding an incandescent, AFAIK, is for the X10 devices that don't use a neutral. They need some current flow to power themselves and when hooked up to a CFL they don't get that. Different from what you're talking about.
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I think we may be talking about 2 different things. The issue I was having with a fluorescent fixture was as follows:
I have an X10 motion detector that controls an X10 appliance module which is plugged into a standard, grounded receptacle. (The X10 model numbers escape me right now, but I could get them if needed.) The fluorescent shop light is plugged into the appliance module.
What would happen is that the motion detector would trigger the appliance module to turn on, which in turn powered the shop light but the appliance module would almost immediately turn off, plunging me back into darkness.
Someone in this ng suggested adding a incandescent bulb along with the shop light, so I added a cheap Christmas candle with one of those little screw in bulbs and the problem went away. The shop light and candle turn on and stay on until the motion sensor sends the off signal.
Is that situation related to the "no-neutral” issue that you mentioned?
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X10 isn't all that expensive but it's not all that reliable, either.
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On 9/9/2013 9:05 PM, bob wrote:

Have you verified there isn't a switched outlet in the room already? Many rooms w/o ceiling fixtures are done that way originally for the very reason.
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Each of the bedrooms in my house originally had a switched outlet and no ceiling fixture. I added a ceiling fixture, controlled by the switch, and hard wired the outlet to be always hot. 30 years with no regrets.
I wonder if replacing the "spot light" ceiling fixture with something that spreads the light better would solve the OP's issue.
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On 9/10/2013 6:00 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Correctly done, the installation will have split the duplex outlets so one is switched and the other live if so. There haven't been hundreds of cases but it certainly wouldn't be the first time when I've discovered a room was that way and the homeowners were completely unaware of it being so...
I'm presuming a spot fixture probably isn't in a central location, but OP hasn't blessed us with any excess of data on which to do more than speculate...
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