How to make quarter rounds and to make a diagonal cut with common tools?

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(Doug Miller) wrote:

Block on each end large enough to take the centers for the correct offset. I thought that was obvious but apaerently not.
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The vibration from being so far off balance would tear it off those blocks in a heartbeat.
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On Oct 1, 10:47 pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Is there some rule that only the workpiece can be mounted between the blocks? It's possible to add some deadwood/weight to counterbalance the workpiece, no?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jni6Qnth844
There's nothing to prevent using the concepts of that fack-tree made eccentric chuck and making your own. The counterweights can be attached to the end mounting blocks, they don't have to be full length.
Howza bout gluing four blanks together and turning four quarter rounds at one time? That doesn't sound impossible, is it?
Let's keep the bar set for the word impossible at its original "not possible" setting. It makes communication easier.
R
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...and all I was trying to do was to add a little humor to the thread...
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I know. And all I was trying to do was to point out "impossible" isn't in this situation...well, that and have a little fun poking fun. ;)
R
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Just stick 4 of them together to make a 6x6 block and turn that, then separate
Easy-peasy, nothing out of balance, you produce four at a time and all exactly the same radius.
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Stuart wrote:

Looks like something isn't right with the clock on your system. Your posts are coming in with a time stamp of an hour older than when you posted them.
--
Free bad advice available here.
To reply, eat the taco.
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Possibly. I seem to recall this happening once before when we had the clock change but I can't remember what the fix was.
The clock on screen is displaying the time correctly.
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Stuart wrote:

Well in that case it was a Windows machine exhibiting a bug in its handling of the automatic adjustment for daylight savings time. It doesn't look like you're running Windows to me, so it's probably a different issue.
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See Nad. See Nad go. Go Nad!
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Correct :-)
Totally different hardware and Operating system, what I think today would be described as a "minority platform".
And hopefully it's now sorted
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"RicodJour" wrote: ----------------------------------- The center of rotation has to be centered on the lathe, but that doesn't mean the workpiece has to have its center centered. There are a number of ways to accomplish that as well. ------------------------------------
Be nice.
Using some basic engineering to make your point may be taking unfair advantage of the situation<G>.
Lew
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Doug Miller wrote:

Afix 3"x6" or thereabouts boards to ends of 3x3. Mount on lathe at board centers.
--

dadiOH
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And make sure you're not standing in front of it when you turn the lathe on, 'cause it's coming off.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Your cup is always half empty, isn't it?
The lathe could be run *very* slowly or - as explained by others - counterweighted. It need not be run at all if one mounted a router so it could be slid along the length of the stock, the stock being rotated manually after each pass. And - anticipating your next objection - yes, the stock would need to be held rigidly while routing.
--

dadiOH
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I think the cup has a crack in it. ;)

In most ways the router would be the safest and provide the smoothest result without handwork. The OP mentioned a tablesaw and bandsaw, and that's what people limited their replies to. It would seem odd to me if the OP had those tools and not a router.
R
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Triangular cut - flop TS to 45, cut through one corner about 1/4" less than halfway through (assuming normal size TS), insert tight-fitting shim into saw kerf and tape across kerf in several places to hold pieces together for safety while you complete the cut, flip stock over and cut from opposite corner, again just short of halfway, complete cut with a handsaw and cleanup with a hand plane.
Quarter round - mark desired profile on end grain of stock, make a cut with the saw blade height just shy of the drawn profile mark (marked curve is facing concave side up), move fence ~1/4" and adjust blade height to just short of the line, make cut, repeat process. The trick is to make the repeated cuts on two sides and try to leave the largest square possible in the area to be wasted. Use the shim/tape to stabilize the kerf(s) as necessary for safety. There are variations on this technique, and safety is paramount, so plan out your cuts before you have an unexpected one.
R
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Criminy -- he said he has a band saw. With a band saw available, why would you even consider doing this on a table saw instead?

See above.
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On Oct 1, 10:53 am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Someone had already mentioned how to do the 45 with a bandsaw. Why would I want to chime in with a "me, too!"?

See above what? You left out the best part - where you said, "There is no safe way to do this on the table saw." - referring to cutting the quarter round. If you see above I described one safe way to do it. There are others.
I would not choose which tools and method to use until I knew what the lumber was and what the machines were like. I'm not assuming the OP has a Unisaw or a Laguna bandsaw - he could have Craftsman hobbyist machines. You are allowed to assume anything you'd like. That's only fair.
R
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You seem to have a rather loose definition of 'safe'.
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This is how I would try - caveat emptor!
First, drill a hole in the exact center of the 3x3 at both ends. Scribe a circle around the center, and remove as much waste as you can with the bandsaw. Build a support so that the wood sits like a barbecue spit, suspended from the centers. Mount over a router table, take very fine passes, spinning the wood....
shelly
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