How to make clear glass frosty

Page 1 of 4  
Next to my main entrance door there is a window - 10"W x 37.5"H - of clear glass. While it appears to be three distinctive windows, if I take off the decorative trim there is only a single 8.0" x 36.0" pane of glass. Presently, there is a sheer curtain offering a mild degree of privacy. Problem is, when I open the door the curtain drifts into the opening.
I could use an less sheer curtain and try to anchor it at the bottom with thumb tacks. My preferred approach is to stick some kind of Contact paper, with a frosty texture, to the glass. This will allow light passage and privacy. I can't find any such Contact paper.
Another possibility would be to replace the glass with a frosty version. It's only held in place with a caulking.
Any other suggestions?
As a separate issue, the glass is labelled "safety tempered." My concern is that a burglar could break the glass and reach in and unlock the deadbolt. I don't know how resistant the glass is to breaking. It's probably about 1/8" thick. I was considering replacing it with Lexan, although I don't know if that thickness would offer better resistance.
Thanks,
R1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rebel1 wrote:

Sand blast.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/9/2014 9:15 AM, Tony Hwang wrote:

I'd been thinking hydrofluoric acid, but that's dificult to find at Walmart.
Ought to be some window treatments in sheets of almost clear stuff, maybe Ace, or other small town hardware.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/9/2014 9:15 AM, Tony Hwang wrote:

Tempered glass is there to prevent jagged shards when it breaks, not to make it break-resistant. If there is a deadbolt within reach of any window (in the door or a side-lite) it should be of the sort that is keyed on both sides and the key should _not_ be kept in the lock as that would be as bad as having an unkeyed lock.
If the frame is amenable, you can use thicker frosted Lexan although it might be simpler to obtain some shatter-resistant film instead.
Making clear glass less transparent is as simple as an application of one of the chemical etching compounds available at most hardware or craft stores although it is still easier to apply a frosted film. I took this route on my shop and basement windows and it is pretty easy and cheap.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/9/2014 5:28 PM, BenignBodger wrote:

That would probably violate building codes. In NJ, you can't have a double-keyed deadbolt on the main entrance door; it would hamper emergency escapes.

I'll have to investigate frosted Lexan, because it might also be more resistant to burglars. Tomorrow, I'll measure the thickness of the present glass, and see if the inner and outer frames allow for a greater thickness.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/9/2014 7:58 AM, Rebel1 wrote:

Most any decent paint department at the Big Box stores or specialized paint store (Sherwin-Williams?) will have an aerosol paint that will "frost" the glass. I used it on my detached garage windows.

Safety tempered only means that when the glass breaks, it breaks into small pieces the size of small peas with no jagged edges like you would see if you dropped a mirror or glass bottle.
Lexan would certainly do the trick or decorative wrought iron grill.
Probably the easiest way to cure the problem if you have glass in the door or adjacent to it as you do (that glass is called a light) is to employ a double keyed deadbolt in the door.
Our doors are double locked when we leave the home and set the alarm. If somebody does break in, say through a window, in addition to dealing with the impending arrival of the police due to the alarm, they will also have to remove anything they are taking through the same window since they won't be able to easily open the doors.
I don't recommend using the double deadbolt when you're home. In case of a fire you don't want to be looking around for a key and leaving the key in the lock kinda defeats the purpose of the lock<g>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/9/2014 9:16 AM, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

In my tinder trap, I leave the key on a shelf near the door. But out of arms reach.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/9/2014 9:16 AM, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

What do you recommend? In our old house had we used anything but a double deadbolt the thief would have gotten in and yes, were were home in bed. The key was in a place hanging, but out of reach to the window in the door.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Unfortunately, the windows in this ranch house are easy to reach because they are so close to the ground. And they are single-pane (surprising for Florida, with its extended air-conditioning season).

When selling a house in NJ, it needs to pass a Certificate for Continued Inspection before it can be sold. A double-keyed deadbolt on the main door is strictly forbidden. It's okay on another exterior door, like in a laundry room.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

TAP Plastics may have the self-adhesive film to roll onto your glass. Kep the tempered glass AND get a 'frosty' view.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/9/2014 9:18 AM, RobertMacy wrote:

Great lead. I especially like the polycarbonate because of its break-resistance. Watch the video here:
http://www.tapplastics.com/product/plastics/cut_to_size_plastic/polycarbonate_sheets/516
Thanks,
R1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/9/14, 10:26 PM, Rebel1 wrote:

it on a house, though. All a burglar would need to do, would be to fire a load of buckshot at point-blank range, and my window would have ugly dings. :)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hsls5ZPCUnE

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't recommend doing that in situ. I did that to the wordwork inour home. Ten years later, was still getting little piles of sand falling of of ??.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rebel1;3293898 Wrote: >

>

Why not buy a flat sheet light diffuser for a fluorescent light fixture from any lighting or home center, cut it into three pieces of the needed size and stick it to your existing glass panes with double sided mounting tape?
I just got off the phone with my local Home Depot, and they sell 5 different styles of 24 inch by 48 inch flat panel acrylic light diffusers for between 6 and 12 dollars each. All are white or colourless with a texture on them which scatters light in all directions, so when you look at the fluorescent light fixture you just see light, not the actual fluourescent tubes. This will allow outdoor light in while still ensuring privacy for those indoors.
--
nestork


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/9/2014 10:15 AM, nestork wrote:

Super idea that I never considered. Wouldn't help with burglar resistance, but there are so many other vulnerable windows that it may not matter. From a security point of view, this house was a poor choice with its low, single-paned windows. Security should have been a top consideration when I was house-hunting in June, since my previous house was burgled and I had a hefty loss.
Thanks.
R1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rebel1 wrote:

They sell a spray on window frost in the paint section at 'Depot / Lowe's that works well and can be removed in the future if needed. $5 or so and a few minutes to mask and spray will fix your problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/9/2014 9:20 AM, Pete C. wrote:

http://www.lowes.com/creative-ideas/paint-stain-and-wallpaper/spray-on-frosted-glass/project?
Tools
1-in and 2-in painter's tape for delicate surfaces Glass cleaner Utility or crafts knife
Materials
Valspar glass frosting spray paint, #105953
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If a burglar wants to break that glass, a spring loaded center punch will make it a pile of pebbles in one "punch". It won't even be that loud.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Wet a piece of news paper sheet with water, cover the glass, one punch with gloved hand glass will break without making noise and won't make a mess with pieces. Learned from burglar.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/9/2014 10:55 AM, Tony Hwang wrote:

Got to be more to that story....
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.