How to Make a Water Level?

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I find a rotating laser level works great. Plant some stakes in the ground and mark the level line on them. Granted, you generally have to do it out of midday sun.
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Definitely -- we found a cheap one for $50 and it worked great to build our deck.
OTOH if the OP doesn't want to spend $5 on a bucket, he probably doesn't want to spend $50 (or more) on a tool that would make the job a whole lot easier.... <shrug>
-Tim
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I tried to do this with just a hose when installing an oval above ground pool. Halfway through the installation I decided to buy a water level that had a sensor on one end. You set this sensor at the desired height and when you raise the other end of the hose, when the water raises to the right height it activates an alarm back in the sensor at the other end of the hose. This was much more accurate. The water level in the final pool is within 1/4" of the top of the pool wall all the way around. good enough for me!
Steve

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I made a similar water level to get our foundation forms level when we built our house. I used a large bottle I had sitting around and about 100 feet of clear tubing. I stuck one end of the tubing into the bottle, and used a plastic "zip" tie to secure it to the handle so it wouldn't slip out. Just be sure not to squeeze the tubing tight enough to compress it.
I then filled the bottle about 2/3 full with water and set it up in the center of our building site. Ideally, it should be slightly higher than any area you are checking. I set mine on a couple of bricks.
Before you begin, lower the open end of the tubing and let the water run out to get the air bubbles out. You may have to suck on the end a bit to get the syphon going if this is your first time to use it.
Once the air bubbles are out, hold the end of the hose up and let the water settle. This is your level reference point. Measure down from this line to whatever you are trying to level. When the measurements are the same everywhere, the site is level.
Be sure to hold your finger over the end of the tubing as you get up and move around. This will prevent water from leaking out the end of the tubing (if you lower the end), or draining back to the reservoir and overflowing it (if you raise the end). If you lose water, your reference will change and you'll have to remeasure from the beginning again.
When you're done checking your level status, stick the open end of the tubing back in the bottle. Then you can just pull it out again, re- establish a reference measurement, and check the level of other areas.
It works very well, is accurate, and can work around corners or other obstructions (something transits and laser levels don't do).
Good luck!
Anthony
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