How to make a speedbump-like concrete dam?

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Ignoramus17081 wrote:
(...)

That makes intuitive, logical sense.
Which is all the more reason to get a couple legal opinions because very little about _Tapley v. Peterson_ seems intuitive or logical to me.
Note that the word 'interruption' has a specific legal meaning that has very little to do with the English word 'interruption'. :) http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/interruption
This cite, at least, implies very heavily that your neighbor was not *legally* interrupted unless you brought *legal action* against him to prevent him from parking on your property. If he parks there after you go home, he had 'uninterrupted' use of the property, *legally speaking*, based on the cite above.
This is hugely scary stuff!
--Winston <-- If he offers to improve the property with a nice new concrete pad, alarm bells should go off for you.
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On Oct 15, 12:36 am, Ignoramus17081 <ignoramus17...@NOSPAM. 17081.invalid> wrote:

Nope, it becomes more than simple permission when you put it on paper -- all sorts of contractual rights become implied and it establishes something of a tenancy/occupancy right which must be terminated under the appropriate process required by your local laws...
~~ Evan
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As for adverse possession, what ought to work is a rental contract. One requirement of a contract is that there be "consideration" (=payment). While payment is most often in money, this is not actually required, and some of the consideration can be in the form of snowplow services.
But, talk to your lawyer. Adverse possession cases don't happen all that often.
Joe Gwinn
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On Thu, 13 Oct 2011 20:24:30 -0500, Ignoramus21718

If you plan to use that hard-tire forklift and a pallet jack, engine hoist and the crane beam and such out that back door, the only real solution is a concrete trench drain with cast iron grates that have a high enough point-load rating to handle the tires and cast iron casters.
http://www.ndspro.com/trench-drains-and-channel-drains/trench-drain/dura-slope-trench-drain-system / NDS has a system with precast plastic trench drains with built-in slope to the end that has the underground drain line - And they have center drain receivers if there's an old-style single drain in the middle of the doorway and you want to use that line.
Best part is, it's got Rebar Holders built into the sections so you can set the grade with rebar stakes and lock it down before embedding it in concrete. You still want a slight dip down from the doorway to the drain, but it doesn't need to be much - 1/8" to 1/4" you can muscle a pallet jack over.
For heavy traffic areas like that loading door they sell galvanized steel frames for over the top to hold cast iron traffic grates. You set the plastic trench drain about an inch deeper to make room for the steel load frame, and allow extra width for the concrete bedding on both sides.
The rubber threshold is a nice idea, but you'll be damaging it a lot, and cussing at it even more.
I have to do this at home on a double garage door... But I have to wait till I core the curb and bring the drain line in, so I know the depth of trench at the out-flow end - it needs to be flow-through from the front yard at the other end, and I can't waste any fall.
If you need to stop the last few drops, you put a rubber sweep on the bottom of the roll-up door - which magically moves up and out of the way when you open the door.
--<< Bruce >>--
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On Oct 13, 9:24 pm, Ignoramus21718 <ignoramus21...@NOSPAM. 21718.invalid> wrote:

As others have suggested, a proper trench drain located in front of the doors -- not a plastic one but a proper commercial grade one with the cast iron or steel cover plate for the trench as you wouldn't want to hear a loud *crunch* when you drive over it with your forklift...
Won't be cheap but it would solve your issue once and for all...
~~ Evan
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On Thu, 13 Oct 2011 20:24:30 -0500, Ignoramus21718

Outside of the building, shaped like this, right?
\___________/ where the bay is above the dam.

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wrote:

You could put in a shallow V shaped drainage swale in front of the door to direct the water away, I would dig out the asphalt for a good two feet in front of the door and use portland cement concrete with some reinforcement.
Won't keep wind driven water out of the building, but it will redirect water from a normal rainstorm around and away.
--<< Bruce >>--
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