How to make a speedbump-like concrete dam?

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My factory building has two bay type garage doors.
One of them faces a parking lot, which happens to be so very slightly above the floor level inside the building. So, during a rain, wates ingresses the building.
I knew about it when I bought the place and this is basically not that big of a deal, as water goes into a drain, and it is not a lot of it.
The place used to have an asphalt speedbump-like dam, that let trucks drive over it and yet kept water out of the building. That structure is in shambles now and, so, water gets in.
I would like to do it the right way, to keep water out, and to be able to drive over it. What should I do, call a concrete guy, asphalt guy, DIY, or what?
What sort of structure has a good chance of having a long life expectancy and keep water out? i
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On 10/13/2011 9:24 PM, Ignoramus21718 wrote:

Make life easy- buy a premade rubber one, and fasten it down with the appropriate adhesive and big-ass bolts. Any commercial OH door place or warehouse supply should have it.
The stuff won't be cheap, but to add new bumps to existing paving and not have them fail quickly, is always hard.
--
aem sends...



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Cool. Do I need to put grout or something under them, to seal them against water ingress?

I understand and agree.
i
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Ignoramus21718 wrote:

Not grout. It will crack under pressure and water will leak through the cracks. Ask the place where you buy the rubber bumpers, but I would suspect some sticky, flexible caulk-like materia.
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Yeah... Butyl will work if the solvent package won't hurt the polymer.
LLoyd
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wrote:

A street near me I frequently dirve on had speed bumps put in.
Six months later they put on another layer of asphalt, but not on the bumps, making the bumps shorter. I like it this way, but the OP should make sure he doesn't end up doing the same thing.
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A gutter right where the door is? All garages at my place of work had that.
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Ignoramus21718 wrote:

They make a rubber glue down strip for such purposes, kind of like a heavy duty cord guard.
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On Oct 13, 9:24pm, Ignoramus21718 <ignoramus21...@NOSPAM. 21718.invalid> wrote:

Dig a trench, drop in one of these and let the water drain off to place that is less offensive...
http://www.fernco.com/stormdrain/channel-drains
Add one of these if you can't drain it "naturally"...
http://www.fernco.com/stormdrain/distribution-boxes
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you cant seal water out, as you suggest the only sure cure is to redirect it.
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On 10/13/2011 9:24 PM, Ignoramus21718 wrote:

I have the same problem once or twice a year when the drain gets overwhelmed. We have a small forklift on that side with small tires so I can't put any permanent obstruction there. So, we have a pile of sandbags on each side of the door and can quickly place them if it's raining extremely hard or if a storm is expected in the night. It's very cheap and works perfectly.
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I love this solution!
i
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You won't, once you've tried it (I can't even _count_ how many ways you'll hate it)!
If you need to drive over with a forklift, they have ramps (which you could make up yourself) just for that purpose -- just to make it up over a short curb or some other impediment.
Such "dead Irishmen" speedbump materials are available in pre-cast lengths, made from polymers, and able to be hot-melt (hot-stripe road glue, not your craft thing) or epoxied to the (clean) concrete.
That, or a re-directing trench just AT the outside face of the doors are the only two ways you're going to keep water out. If you used a narrow trench, then you'd only need a simple plate of steel the get a forklift over it.
(did you ever consider that a mass of sand is porous? <G>)
LLoyd
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On 2011-10-14, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

But hopefully the bags would not be porous. Nevertheless, I agree with your argument. I will spend a couple hundred bucks on the proper solution.
i
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On Oct 14, 11:34am, Ignoramus17081 <ignoramus17...@NOSPAM. 17081.invalid> wrote:

I used to use the "tyvek" covered sand bags in a conversion van I owned to keep the rear end behind me during the winter.
Even though they were "waterproof" it only took a couple of seasons of loading them into the van and then storing them under the deck for them to get worn enough to leak a bit of sand here and there.
I would imagine that moving them around in a parking lot would result in even more wear and tear.
In other words, they might not start out "porous" but they might become that way fairly soon.
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Ignoramus17081 wrote:

You can buy the strips right at the Home Depot/Lowes places. You want a nice warm day and use the correct adhesive. We did this on the fire station a few years ago when the concrete settled a bit. Easy to do and works. The only thing to keep in mind is do not turn while crossing the strips. Drive straight over them.
--
Steve W.

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What are they called? I will be at HD tonihgt
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Ignoramus17081 wrote:

The kit was near the weatherstripping and related stuff. Believe it was a garage door threshold
Yep This is the same kit. http://www.homedepot.com/buy/doors-windows/garage-doors-openers-accessories/tsunami-seal/16-ft-garage-door-threshold-kit-black-83243.html
--
Steve W.

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On 10/14/2011 9:25 PM, Steve W. wrote:

http://www.homedepot.com/buy/doors-windows/garage-doors-openers-accessories/tsunami-seal/16-ft-garage-door-threshold-kit-black-83243.html
Suspect that won't be near big enough for a commercial-size overhead door. The ones I have seen actually in use are more like parking stop strips- 6-8 inches wide, and at least a couple inches high. In addition to the glue (which helps keep water from passing under), you do need to spike them down with big lag screws.
--
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What I would like is something 1.5-2" high, 8-10 inches wide, and some thick permanent goop to put under it to seal the gap between the floor and the bump.
i
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