How to lubricate Aluminum windows?

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We had our house built in 1996, so it is now 17 years old. Aluminum windows were installed.
Some windows that are seldom used are difficult to open, I think, and hope, that lubing them will fix that problem. I just don't know what kind of lube to use. I know WD 40 is a no, and I don't want something that will be a dirt & dust magnet.
What do you guys suggest? Oh yeah, and thanks.
Bob-tx
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"Bob-tx" <Live Spam free> wrote in

I'd use graphite powder. Test it by using a pencil (a real pencil, and then the writing part) on the parts that rub.
--
Best regards
Han
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"Bob-tx" <Live Spam free> wrote in message

Exterior window mechanisms need to be cleaned of atmospheric deposits and rust. This is why Pella Window Corp. recommends WD-40 for its casement mechanisms.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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No. It says in 4 different places: CaUtion: Do not allow panels to soak in water. only use the cleaning solutions listed above. never use scouring compounds, sandpaper, gasoline, benzene, acetone, carbon tetrachloride, de-icing fluids, mineral spirits, lacquer thinner, armor all®, Lysol®, Simple green®, wood wash, MeK or other strong solvents, wD-40®, vegetable oil, lime-a-way®, or highly alkaline or abrasive cleaning agents. Do not power-wash. <http://www.pella.com/owners-manuals-and-warranties/owners - manuals/woodownersmanu.pdf>
--
Best regards
Han
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By mechanism he may mean the crank part, not the panels.
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YUK. WD-40 gums up and does attract and hold dust and dirt. it's mostly kerosene.
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Jim Yanik
jyanik
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I have never seen wd -40 gum up. I have seen it dry and leave a dry varnish like protective film, but certainly is not intended for lubrication.
Greg
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WD-40 is mostly dewaxed kerosene,at least 60%. varnish of that sort can be gummy,before it hardens.
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Jim Yanik
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A better product, crc 2-26 , and safe on plastics.
Greg
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Second the wax suggestion; my ancient Sears aluminum ladder recommends exactly that.
Jon
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On 3/24/2012 1:12 PM, Jon Danniken wrote:

paraffin in all the rubbing surfaces then slid the windows back and forth several times. They still work perfectly a year later.
Paul
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Paul Drahn wrote:

I used to do that with my camping trailer(5th wheel) Does not get messy. It just works good.

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On Sat, 24 Mar 2012 14:54:32 -0500, "Bob-tx" <Live Spam free> wrote:

Wax or silicone spray
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Bob-tx wrote:

Hmm. WHY are they difficult to open? Several reasons come to mind:
1. The tracks and other parts that slide together are dirty. 2. The aluminum itself has become corroded. 3. The foundation of the house has shifted causing a warping of the tracks.
Lubrication is not the best answer for any of the three, although it may help.
Try first a detailed cleaning, complete with a mildly acetic solution to knock down any aluminum oxide buildup. Perhaps even steel wool on the really rough areas.
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Before the OP cleans off the evidence, he should look for spots that are shinier than others. That would be a good indication of warping of the frame and what areas need attention.
-- Bobby G.
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On 3/24/2012 2:54 PM, Bob-tx wrote:

I once did commercial glass work, store fronts and automatic doors. I worked with a lot of aluminum sliding parts and the best thing to lube sliding aluminum parts with is saw wax. It can be obtained from most good hardware suppliers and it will prove to be useful for many things. One tube will last a typical homeowner for years. ^_^
http://preview.tinyurl.com/7a9jn5y
TDD
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wrote:

In AZ, the silicon spray lube lasts approx 6 months, before need to reapply. Any idae how long for saw wax?
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On 3/25/2012 8:39 AM, Robert Macy wrote:

Well, it's waterproof and doesn't wash away with plain water. A thin film doesn't attract any more dust than any other lube I've used but you can wipe the surface clean with a rag and reapply as needed. How long it lasts really depends on use, I've never really considered how long because anytime I'd service equipment, I'd clean and reapply the saw wax to the needed parts. Oh yea, you should really learn the difference between "silicon" and "silicone", sorry, I have to tease you about that. I doubt you would want to bump into a woman equipped with "silicon" implants. ^_^
TDD
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wrote:

I know the difference, but sadly my keyboard doesn't! In defense, it's getting old and seems to skip charactrs.
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On 3/25/2012 9:39 AM, Robert Macy wrote:

Silicone is the way to go but you need to use more. Best way to do that is use silicone paste. It is commonly sold as dielectric grease or "spark plug boot grease" in an auto parts store.
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