How to install a RX cabinet

I've run into a problem on my bathroom remodelling project and I'd like your input. Here's the situation...
The house is a1982 tri-level with 2 1/2 baths. The old medicine cabinet was about 14' tall by 26" wide, with sliding doors. The new cabinet rough-in is 24" tall by 14" wide (hinged door). And the wall that the cabinet will fit in has 2X6 wall studs.
My problem is that ONE of the wall studs will have to be cut to frame in the new cabinet, but behind this wall is the second full bath (master). This master bath has a shower that is tiled with wire-mesh and mortar and the wire-mesh is stapled onto the stud that I need to cut.
I am afraid that if I cut this 2x6 wall stud to frame-in the new medicine cabinet that I will disturb or break the tile for the master bathroom shower... and this is the only full bathroom left in the house.
I am thinking of taking a jig-saw and notching-out the 2x6 wall stud so that I can frame-in the new medicine cabinet with 2x4's. This will leave some of the wall stud undisturbed in the master bath shower. Is this a good idea or bad?
I really, really appreciate everyones input!
Thank you, Dave
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DaddyMonkey wrote:

OK, I am not understanding this very well, or you have made an input error. It seems to me that if the old opening is 14" tall x 26" wide (and I am assuming that you meant 14" and not 14'), then the new cabinet will fit width wise due to it being only 14" wide. Why would you have to cut a stud?
If you do have to cut the stud for some reason that I cannot comprehend, then I would use a hand saw to cut to the depth of a 2x4, then use a chisel to split out the pieces (do this with a downward blow on the chisel and use no more force than is absolutely necessary). The closer you make your hand saw cuts, the easier this will be. If you absolutely cannot get any hand saw or rat tail saw in to make these cuts, then you may try a variable speed jig saw at a slow speed.
Don't apply a lot of pressure to the saw (forcing it into the wood). Take your time and let the saw teeth do their job.
You should be fine.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Thank you Mr. Allison, and sorry about the typo. All sizes given should have been in INCHES and not feet.
The old medicine cabinet was about 14 inches tall. The new cabinet is 24 inches tall, so part of the wall stud must be removed or trimmed.
From what I understand, you are saying that I should be O.K. notching-out part of the 2x6 wall stud and framing-in for the new medicine cabinet with 2x4's... correct?
Thanks, Dave
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DaddyMonkey wrote:

OK, I think that I see the problem. The "stud" that you are needing to notch is horizontal? If so, it is not a stud, but blocking. Studs are always vertical.
If the above is correct, then you can notch the 2x6 blocking and frame in with new 2x4 blocking.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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I guess this is what I get for having a WebTV and not knowing how to up-load pictures... <LOL>
The new medicine cabinet is TALLER! It's a STUD that had to be notched!
Anyway, I took a piece of scrap plywood and cut it to fit the master shower and wedged it in place against the tiles with some 2x4's. This kept the tiles in the master bath shower from jarring around as I notched out the stud from within the guest bathroom. She's all framed in and looks nice. :-) Thanks for your help, Dave
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P.S. The wall stud is in a NON load-bearing wall.
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