How to inspect furnace filters?

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On Sat, 3 Oct 2015 08:20:58 -0400, Stormin Mormon

If you want to play with toys, not guess, and always know when the filter needs changing put a filter-check device on your furnace (like is used on large engine air-filtes). It is just a differential pressure guage - can be as simple as a manometer tube connected across the filter - from the air return duct to the return plenum of the furnace. A plugged filter will have a higher differential pressure than a clean one.
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That is what we used at work on the large building air filters. They had a motor on them so we could roll them up some when the pressure differential reached a certain level. They were on a large roll at the bottom and the takeup roll at the top.
There was a pickup tube on each side of the filter. Some were gauges with alarm switches,and some were simple fluid indicators.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca posted for all of us...

You are talking above Stumpy level...
--
Tekkie

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Tekkie® wrote:

Then question will be how to use the device..., LOL!
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On Thursday, October 1, 2015 at 3:23:16 PM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Nor or they required to have AC and battery backup. Battery only ones are widely available. AC plus battery is probably required by code for new construction in many places though.
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On Thursday, October 1, 2015 at 11:40:49 AM UTC-5, Don Y wrote:

Excessive chatter deleted.

Well, I do.

I don't suspect what other people do with their smoke alarms. Not my business.

More chatter deleted.

I don't "discover" the filter needs to be changed. Remember, I said I write it on my calendar. Also, I DO keep spare filters on hand, just like I keep spare batteries on hand for the smoke detectors and those batteries are also used for clocks and remotes.
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On 10/3/2015 2:42 AM, ItsJoanNotJoann wrote:

Cuts down on trips to the store, to stay a bit stocked up.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 10/3/2015 7:22 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

The biggest problem with staying stocked up on batteries is that it is getting harder and harder to find a pack of batteries that qualifies, at least to me, as 'that will be enough to keep me going for a little while'. The packs are getting bigger and bigger.
Bill
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On 10/3/2015 6:11 AM, Bill Gill wrote:

Planning on replacing particular batteries at particular times (instead of letting the device complain when *it* wants the battery to be replaced) means you can buy what you need and *when* you will need it. Instead of finding a place to *store* (isn't that what "stores" do?) those additional cells!
Costco has some eneloops going on sale...
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On 10/3/2015 9:45 AM, Don Y wrote:

what I am talking about is the fact that the packages they come in are growing. It used to be you could buy packs of 2 AA cells. Then it went to 4, not you are lucky to find a pack of 8. I prefer to keep enough on hand replace the batteries in one remote, and get more when I run that bunch down.
Bill
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On 10/3/2015 10:02 AM, Bill Gill wrote:

Yes. Even if you *can* find a "small package" that isn't "stale" -- because no one seems to want to buy in small lots (I recall Leno joking that Costco is now selling caskets! But, you've got to buy *6*...) -- you end up having to buy the tiny packages at places that are outrageously priced. Like "the qwikie mart", a *clothing* store, etc.
So, why buy 2 when you can buy 12? Ans: cuz then you have to *store* 12 -- and, hope they actually work when/if you need them ("Gee, I *thought* I bought some of these a while ago... where did I *put* them?")
The AA/AAA rechargeables are less of a problem for us. We have one of those tiny chargers that holds *just* four cells and hangs directly off the electric outlet. So, we know exactly where our "spares" are stored.
I have bigger/fancier chargers that will charge 8 D's, AA's, AAA's 9V, etc. But, we have so few things that use anything *other* than AA and AAA that its foolish to purchase those sizes -- and leave them sitting on/in/near a charger for the year or so it might take for that *one* device to need new batteries!
[The AA/AAA see lots of turnover because *something* always needs new AA/AAA batteries!]
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wrote:

I can still buy 2-packs of AA and AAA batteries - but they cost almost the same as a 4 or 6 pack when they go on sale. The 2 packs are never on sale. With batteries now having 10 year shelf life, buying 24 for $8 makes a lot more sense than buying 2 for $4.
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On Sat, 03 Oct 2015 07:45:56 -0700, Don Y

What helps is eliminating D and C cells. I don't use my D cell Maglites any more, and probably will plain throw them away soon. I use AA and AAA for all my flashlights. LED. PC keyboards, mice, remotes use the same. I use some remaining Eneloops, and Sony NiMH, with 2 Sony chargers. One loaded with AA, the other AAA. Still have to pick up some buttons and 9v occasionally. But I resist buying anything using other than AA or AAA.
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On 10/3/2015 10:13 AM, Vic Smith wrote:

For "around the house", they are pretty much overkill. There are times when I'm trying to peer deep into the engine compartment (lots of obstructions, shadows, etc.) that benefit from their brighter, more focused light (than the little "penlight" or "cranklight" flashlights).
If I need to look "down the road" or into a neighbor's back yard, I'll drag out the Thor-X or something similarly sized.
But, to peer behind a computer (located UNDER my workbenches) or under a bed, etc., a little 2 AA cell maglite works just fine. Or, the three cell HD give(throw)aways.
Someone once claimed that AA and D cells were essentially the same "internals", just different shells. I'd find that hard to believe (unless it's akin to the "11 oz Coors" scam). One *hopes* the big, heavy, bulky D cells are actually *giving* you something for the extra size/weight!

Many of my devices have special "battery packs" (not counting the obvious candidates: laptops, cameras, etc.). One of my "digital magnifying glasses" uses the Sony "SmartLithium" modules that they used in their cameras. Many other things just require me to plug in a "charger" (wall wart) and the batteries charge inside the unit.

Exactly. I can buy 2032's in quantity as there are so many things that now use them; just keep them handy and "next time" I'm inside a computer, pull the old battery and replace it.
It's amusing how 9v "transistor" batteries have fallen from favor since the days of youth (in "transistor" radios). Aside from the smoke/CO detectors, I can' think of anything that uses them (so, why keep them on hand IN ANTICIPATION of a failure?)
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On Sat, 03 Oct 2015 10:50:46 -0700, Don Y

Blood glucose meters if you have a diabetic in the house, some good multimeters, my old garage door opener, the transmitter for my radio controlled "wire puller" (an old R/C truck that runs across suspended ceilings pulling network cables). I generally have a six-pack of them available - buy them when Canadian Tire has a good sale on, for less than a normal 4-pack - and often less than a 2-pack.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Ditto here but I try to use Lithium equivalent as much as I can. Last long time. Initial cost is high but at the end not really. I have drawful of batteries of all sorts.
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On 10/3/2015 11:22 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Most glucometers that I've seen are CR2032 or 2025. The trend seems to be to make the meters smaller and smaller. Also, they seem to be treated as largely disposable -- vendors wanting to "hook" you on a new meter to get you "addicted" to THEIR (highly profitable) test strips.
[One of the non-profits for which I've done volunteer work recycles medical... "discards" (not actually "waste", just things that are no longer "wanted" by hospitals, doctors, patients, etc. So, you see a LOT of glucometers!]

My portable DMM's (venerable Simpson and disposable "1 digit" HD units) have 9V batteries. The better (5 and 6 digit) DMM's are line powered.

Ours used a tiny -- 1/2 AAAA? -- 12V! battery. Replaced exactly *once* so the mate (two pack) is still in the refrigerator, somewhere

I had a box of lithium 9V batteries -- in hermetically sealed pouches (that smelled, internally, of alcohol or somesuch?) -- that I used to replenish my meters. The HD units I simply discard when the battery dies (or, when the displayed reading starts to look *too* incorrect to put much faith/effort into.
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The blood meters are about like the printers. Almost give them away so you have to buy the strips made just for them. Just as many razors are. Give away the razor and charge a high price for the blades.
Sort of hard to carry around a line powered DMM. Outside of lab work there is seldom any need for more than the 4 1/2 digits of the Fluke meters that run on 9 volt batteries.
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On 10/3/2015 12:31 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Exactly. "Toilet paper dispensers" :>

I don't tend to do much design/debug work outside of my office so can rely on almost everything being line powered. E.g., I pulled an LCD TV into the living room last night to troubleshoot power supply (or main board) issues. Need 120V in order to test the TV so I've got that same 120V to power my DMM, DSO, etc.
I keep a HF DMM in the garage for the times when I suspect the battery in one of the vehicles may be low or faltering. But, then, I'm really only looking at how it *sags* when cranking and don't really care much about the *actual* voltage that it is reporting. Probe battery terminals vs. battery cables to see if a high resistance connection, etc.
Or, operating as a glorified continuity tester...
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I worked in a large plant and mainly used meters in the field. If they had been line powered, I would have needed 50 to 100 feet of power cord.
I just got a HF DMM (free with purchase) a few weeks ago when the local store opened. Checked it to about 30 volts of DC and 130 volts of AC compaired with my Fluke meter. Most of the time the HF was within one number of the last digit. Ohms were slightly off, but probably within spec. As I did not need to, I did not try it, but there is one adjustment inside the meter to calibrate it.
It surprises me how accurate the inexpensive stuff is from China. I bought 4 3 digit DC volt meters (just a circuit board with displays and wire leads) for around $ 5 shipping included. Hooked all of them and a Fluke to a 0 -24 volt supply. All of them but one read the same thing. That was to a tenth of a volt. The other was sometimes off by one on the last digit. It had an adjustment, but did not try it as the meter was close enough for me.
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