How to GLUE metal floor and ceiling tracks to concrete

Is anyone know about using GLUE rather than screws or pins?? This is in connection to building a interior non load bearing wall.
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Me... for one. -----
- gpsman
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I would appreciate the name of the GLUE product and any hints on using it. I am building one wall 32 feet long and 11 feet high..
Thanks in advance.
Doug Clark
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I would not consider glue the proper fastening method for metal track. Depending on the installation, it would not meet code either. Panel adhesive would probably work, but why would you not fasten it in a more conventional manner? The fastening method is subject to what the materials are that you are fastening to. The concrete floor would use either PAT (gun loads) or an alternate concrete anchor like Tapcon, Nail-In, wire & nail, etc.
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Why Glue?
I live in a condo.
I plan to do the work myself
The condo rules say that I must get permission if I invade the ceiling or floors or the walls of the ajoining units.
This would mean:
* hiring it done
* getting a building permit
* hiring a electrical contractor
* maybe even a architect plan
I do not need to invade the walls of the adjoining units and will secure the abuting walls with screws.
Hopfully I can get by telling them that I am not invading the walls, ceiling and floor as well as I am doing the work myself
Thanks
Doug Clark
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doug wrote:

extra bedroom. Just made a 'jam fit' wall, shimmed as tight as I could against the floor and ceiling. Used non-marking rubber over the top plate, and just went over the existing carpet. Managed to find a pretty good match for the 1960s style paneling, so it vanished pretty well. Came out clean- once the carpet divot was brushed out, you could not tell it had been there. It was only 8' high by about 10' long, though. Not sure you could pull off the same thing with metal studs and plates, since you can't kick the slightly-too long end studs into place. Maybe if you bury some extra-long skinny screw jacks in the wall every 8 feet or so?
No, it won't meet code, but if that really isn't a concern where you live, it may work. (as long as nobody stumbles too hard into the middle of the wall.) A couple short cross walls framing some shelves or something would stiffen it up a bunch. -- aem sends...
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Glue will probably count as invading, just the same as screwing or nailing.
If the wall is non load-bearing, take aemeijers's suggestion and build the wall as a wedge-fit. Cut the studs just 1/16" too long and it'll stand there forever, secure as any glue-job.
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Google: epoxy construction adhesives and there will be several interesting sources for you to contact. Most any 2-part slow cure systems will work just fine on concrete. Polyurethane construction adhesive/sealants are a good second choice, but the epoxy-concrete bond is stronger. Care must be taken to ensure the metal is clean and grease free, probably the most fussy part of the project.
Joe
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I glue the wall stud plates to concrete when remodelling basements that have water tubing imbedded in the concrete slab (for heat). To not risk imbedding a fastener in the heat tubing. A polyurethane adhesive holds as tight as any other fastener, probably better, just put some blocks or sandbags on the work while it is curing. I once had to remove a wall plate I glued in the wrong place... by the time I got it peeled from the floor it took a divot of concrete with it (glue was stronger). Glue would not be an invasion, but in my opinion some 2.5 inch drywall screws to hold your wall plates down/up would not be an intrusion either as they are not going to pop into your neighbors condo.
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My nephew, the PE, just came by. He suggested GORILLA GLUE.
Has anyone tried this product for bonding metal to concrete?
Thanks
Doug Clark
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No thats the wrong glue. Look for PL polyurethane construction adhesive. The PL brand is better than Liquid Nails, (which is an excellent glue too). But for what you are describing I'd use PL. Personally I would still shoot some screws if you can, the intrusion of a few screws is no worse than hanging a picture IMO and should not violate the HOA.
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On Tue, 16 Dec 2008 22:00:29 -0800 (PST), doug

Gorilla Glue really does work, but it's expensive. Liquid Nails is supposed to work, for less $.
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Gorilla glue might be strong but it is very liquid and would not stay in place, a tubed construction adhesive will stay on the ceiling while he applies the stud.
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You are not going to bond metal to concrete period. Metal is non- porous. Glue requires pores. It may "stick" but it won't have any strength. A sharp blow will crack it free. That goes for construction adhesives, epoxies, etc..
Yes, they epoxy anchor bolts into foundations, but the key word is IN. They drill a hole in the concrete, fill with epoxy, and insert the THREADED rod into the hole. The epoxy grabs into the threads like a nut.
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