How to get wheelbarrow tire back on rim

The tire went flat on my wheelbarrow, and came loose from the rim. I have tried everything to get that tire inflated, but can not get it to seal well enough around the rim to be able to get the air to start filling it. There's got to be some sort of trick to this. Anyone know? The tire is not bad, it just wont expand to the rim. I have tried to lean on it, work it against the rim with my hands (I can get one side on the rim, but not the other), and even tried to tie a rope tightly around it. I never have this much trouble with car tires as I am with this stupid little tire.
Joe
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Put an inner tube in it or take it to a service station or tire shop a large compressor can usualy put out enough air fast enough to blow it in shape
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On Wed, 27 Apr 2005 03:50:02 -0500, cowboyjoe@_________.com wrote:

1. Remove the valve stem to increase the volume of air going into the tire. 2. Clean throughly and then swab soapy water all the way around the rim and tire. 3. Wrap a 15 foot long cord or rope around the middle of the tire and pull tight so the tire collapses from the rope. This forces the tire edge to touch the soapy rim edge. You will need hitch loop in the rope to pull tightly enough to collapse the tire. 4. Inflate till it pops. 5 reinstall valve stem and inflate .
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A trick I use is those little ratcheting straps you can buy (to hold down cargo or whatever on a vehicle). Just wrap it around the tire and ratchet it till the "bead" expands out to the rim. A little water helps too. It shows where it may leak and helps the tire to slide and fill in the rim.
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OR if your really stuck, spray in some starter fluid or other flammable aerosol spray and then light it, the pressure of the ignition will seal the tire enough for you. I've seen 4x4 guys use this out in the sticks.
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you do realize that a service station would charge you about 5 bucks to do this & it would only take about 3 minutes, right?
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What self-respecting alt.hr'er would do that?
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The tire places in our area give better service than that, and will usually help with something like this for $0.0. --Phil

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Phil Munro Dept of Electrical & Computer Engin
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@cc.ysu.edu Youngstown State University
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do
This is done every day of the world. Truck tires are a bear to install on the road without a large air line and bead seating ring. Once you get the tire on and off with spoons, make a couple fast circles around the wheel, inside the tire, with starting fluid. Up and over the tire to the ground. toss a match at it, and POOF! the bead is seated. With over the road truck tires, you still have to add air afterwards. Ask any truck mechanic and he'll tell you he has probably done this before.
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Been there, done that. Used a belt clamp and a neighbor's shop compressor, which puts out more air than my little battery-powered Campbell Hausfeld inflator. In about two seconds, it seated the bead, inflated the tire, and tore the belt clamp in two. Next time, I'll take the wheel off the wheelbarrow and take it to a local gas station with an air pump that I can control a little better. Regards --
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Use a match & propane... no.. really...
I once saw video on Discovery channel about 4 wheelers in Iceland (of all places) and it showed a really neat trick... when in the outback (so to speak) and they need to re-seat a tire they fill it with propane, (as best they can, obviously with it unseated some leaks out, but they seem to get enough in) then they toss a match at it. It literally explodes into a momentary fireball, but somehow the explosive action is enough to seat the tire. I assume they come back and let Propane out, and replace with air.. but the program was not a detailed how-to, it just showed the video of them exploding the tire back onto the rim. I am not nuts or desperate enough to try it, but it was some pretty cool video...
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

WOWZA! I do believe it, but I wonder who the hell was the mad genius who first thought of trying that?
I wonder if he was someone who had worked with explosive forming of heavy sheet metal, and figgered, "Why not?"
Jeff
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(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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I had the same problem. I stuffed as many crumpled news papers as I could into the tire, that helped a little.
I think the real answer is go to the tractor supply place and get an inner tube.
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Christopher A. Young
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NOPE, I would start with a little propane and work my way up to more, this really does work.
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