How to get paint off natural wood window casing?

I'm doing some painting and decided to try getting the paint off the window casings which was slopped on by the original painters before the moldings were put on. The painted areas are not covered by the moldings so it looks like hell. I've been able to forget about it with the drapes covering it but with the drapes down I just can't let it go. I pulled the moldings and tried scraping carefully with a utility knife and also tried sanding. Neither method is very effective and where it does get the paint off the surface, there is still paint in the grain. Anyone know an easy and effective way to completly remove the paint?
Thanks John
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paint stripper. use a gel kind so it'll stay put.
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Alcohol is latexes remover, try a bit to be sure it wont affect what is underneath. Good way to use that crappy gin left over
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After the stripper if there's paint in the pores coat with Zinssers Seal Coat and restrip. Users report success in the shellac pulling it out.
On Thu, 5 Aug 2004 16:51:08 -0700, "Charles Spitzer"

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On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 23:45:28 +0000, John Richards wrote:

Applying some heat first will soften the paint, making it easier to scrape. Then use a tungsten carbide scraper to get the paint off. You should be able to remove almost all the paint without removing the wood. The poorer the paint adheres, the easier it is to remove. Google for Sandvik scraper. Sounds like you should by the 1" scraper. Also, there is a Canadian guy auctioning off a good set of scrapers on EBay now. I got one set for $6 (+$6 shipping). Normally, these go for about $15 each.
- Scott
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You should first try a standard methylene chloride containing paint stripper. After removing the paint, but before it is wiped clean of any remaining bits of stripper and paint, wipe it down with an ATM stripper. This stands for Acetone, Toluene, Methanol. It is the flammable stripper that does not contain any methylene chloride and is found right next to the MC containing strippers. Just look at the label. The purpose for the solvent wipe down is two-fold. First, the toluene will remove the residual wax from the MC paint stripper and second, the alcohol and acetone will keep any residual paint from resticking to the wood. Paint left in the grain is due to poor application of the stripper or really tenacious paint. I have come to believe the shellac trick is just a cover for a proper second stripping. There are also dedicated paint strippers. BIX makes one. It is a powder that is mixed with water. If there is still paint in the grain after trying both strippers, you will need to go at it with a brass brush but not too hard.
Good Luck.
To contact directly, remove both NGs.

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Forget what other bozos said, Alcohol is the best remover for Latex and not oil varnish . But try an area first.
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