How to get firewood into a basement?

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Just for George (it is complicated, I'm sure we all agree): I meant to say I will bring 1 (ONE) cord of wood into my basement, every few (FEW) weeks (just one at a time, mind you), for approximately 8 times (which I assume covers the cold period here is NJ). That makes 8 (EIGHT) cords per winter. I have 20 cords right now outside my driveway, so I know how much work it is to stack and split. The good thing about a furnace is that it takes unsplit wood up to around 10-12" diameter.
Claro?
Dean
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dean wrote:

No, it is not complicated. You could have simply said that you intended to burn 8 cords during the winter season and to move it into the basement as needed. I was pushing you to clarify if you would really stack 8 cords in your basement since 8 cords would fill a 10 x 17 room stacked 6 feet high.
It really doesn't matter, the real point is that 8 cords is way to much. Furnaces, because of the way they are operated tend to be use more wood than a regular stoves but 8 cords is still a high estimate.
Now for the saw question. The blade doesn't need to be messed with very often. You ought to be sharpening your chain at least every cord (assume 16" long blocks), possibly more depending on the type of wood. You may want to lightly draw file the blade every 3-4 cords just to make sure that sharp edges are not developing and to keep the top and bottom flat. With good oiling, keeping the blade out of the dirt, a sharp chain, and reasonable tension, the blade shouldn't need attention more than every 5-6 cords and probably would need replacement for 40 cords or more. You will run through 3-4 chains before you need to replace the blade.
Cutting in a curve may indicate a blade wearing on one side but most likely is cause by incorrect sharpening (teeth sharper on one side).
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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

Well that makes sense, dumb me! He loads a (1) cord eight times. I guess he could load the same cord eight times, meaning that he moved the same cord into the basement eight times. But if he does that, doesn't he have to move it out to again move it back in? loads it into? eight times? Seems like he would have to load (move) the same cord 24 times, 8 into the basement and 8 out of the basement and then 8 more into the basement. I don't see why he would move it into the basement just to move it back out and then again move it into the basement.
You mean I got it wrong? or did he mean he was moving a cord into the basement and after a few weeks he would move another cord into the basement. He would do this with eight cords. Let's see, a few weeks means 3 or 4 weeks, so lets split it and make it 4 x 3 weeks and 4 times 4 weeks. That's 28 weeks. Where the hell does this guy live that winter is 28 weeks long?
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George E. Cawthon wrote:

Give it up George. You were wrong to start with. It was perfectly clear to anyone who can read English. You have now compounded it by picking some numbers to justify an unwarrantable conculusion. FEW = 2 or more. 16 weeks or even 24 is not an unreasonable period. By the way. When discussing a chainsaw it is a BAR not a blade.
Harry K
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Yes you did., but that's understandable. You're George.
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Are these full, honest cords of wood? 2-tons each, air-dried? 128 cu. ft. each?
That's one huge amount of wood to be packing into a house, by any of the means suggested.
You might be well-served by sealing and insulating the house, and installing efficient (read also, clean) wood-burner(s). Then the wood could also sit longer, and dry further.
Lower temps, and zoning help a lot, too.
HTH, J
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I'm putting in a charmaster furnace, its supposed to be very efficient. And my house is very well insulated, its just got electric heat which costs a fortune.
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with you using wood to heat. if you're adding a chimney, you might be in trouble. ....thehick
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snipped-for-privacy@sme-online.com wrote:

I burn around 6 cord a year. One armful at a time or a barrow full it all comes into the house eventually. Curious here. Where did you get 2 tons per cord? AFAIK the specifications of a cord do not mention weight. While all wood has approx the same BTU per pound, the weight per cord will vary all over the place.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

2 tons per cord is a pretty standard estimate. Soft woods are around 30 pounds/ cubic foot and hard woods are around 40 pound/cubic foot.
So 30 x 128 = 3840, and 40 x 128 = 5120 and you have variables of water content and air space. Air space is likely to range from 10 to 20 percent and so is water.
4000 pounds (2 tons) per cord is a reasonable estimate.
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