How to get 110 electricity from 220v/40amp stove circuits?

I need to supply four 110v/15amp circuits temporarily for a temporary function to the backyard. So I could add four 15 or 20 amp breakers to my panel and run four wires from the panel to the backyard.
But, could I save on wire and just run one or two of those fat wire that supports 220v/40amp circuits instead? I have some of that wire lying around. How would I get two (maybe four?) 110 volts at the other end?
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Can't you just use extension cords? What is it you need to power and for how long?
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ississauga wrote:

In order to get a circuit to 15 amps, you need 15 amp breakers or fuses. The 220V part of the problem depends. You need the neutral and I don't believe all stove circuits had a neutral.
What you are really asking to do is to put in a sub panel box.
For any temporary use, I would consider using existing circuits and running heavy 12guage extension cords or add the new breakers to you existing panel.
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Joseph E. Meehan

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ississauga wrote:

What are you powering, and how far do you have to go? You know you can run more than one outlet on a circuit (unless the loads are large.)
What wire do you have "lying around"? Does it have 3 conductors or 4?
-Bob
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (ississauga) wrote in message

It's not safe unless you really know what you're doing with two-phase 220V and that much ampacity. But if this is really temporary, and you must play with fire...
If you have a conventional 4-wire stove outlet, it will have two hot phases, neutral, and ground. The leg from either hot phase to neutral is a 110-volt circuit, so you have two 110-volt circuits available to you.
You will also need very heavy conductors, proper fusing, and proper isolation for anything that is being used outdoors.
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Chris Green

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Christopher Green wrote:

The electric dryer would be better (assuming it's a 4 wire outlet.) Temporarily replace the dryer's breaker with a 20A. The dryer will still work just fine except maybe on its highest temperature settings.
Connect a 4-pin dryer plug to the end of your makeshift long cord. At the other end, put a deep 4" square handybox with a proper cable clamp and install 2 duplex GFCI outlets. Connect the red wire to one LINE hot screw and the black wire to the other LINE hot screw, connect the white wire to both LINE neutral screws, and the green wire to the metal box and optionally to the ground screws on each GFCI (if you leave them open, the GFCI's will get their ground through the strap from the metal box) Now you have 4 GFCI protected 15A or 20A outlets on 20A circuits. Neither GFCI device will know the other is there. Run short extension cords as necessary from this distribution box.
When you are all done, don't forget to change the dryer breaker back to its original 30A.
Not that I'd actually recommend doing something like that...
regards, Bob
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I would. Heck, you only live once!
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