How to Frost Garage Windows for Privacy ?

Page 1 of 2  
I just had a rollup garage door installed that has windows which will allow daylight (good) and a view of the electronics and tools in my garage (bad). The windows that came with the door are clear glass. What can I use to obscure the view from outside without losing the natural light?
Some searching came up with two potential solutions: 1) Spray on fogging paint, apparently available from craft stores; and 2) Aquarium crystal paint.
I believe that any tinted or reflective film will work except that, at night, someone would be able to see into the lit garage. That's almost a good enough fix, but not quite. I also understand that I cannot add any appreciable weight to the door, so that rules out adding a thin sheet of bubbled light fixture panes (like on flourecent lights).
I'd appreciate any shared experiences on this. Thanks.
- Magnusfarce
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
you'll lose most of the natural light (can be overcome with interior lighting) but some dark colored plastic window screen stapled over the window openings from inside, using more than one layer if one layer is too transparent for your liking, might work
just staple along the top (not the sides or bottom) then the screen or layers of screen can be lifted and temporarily clipped in place (clothes pins, etc.) to increase lighting when the garage is being used
another arrangement might be to add a solid panel of thin plywood etc. about the size of each window, permanently shimmed back from the window a couple inches between it and the window, so light could pass through all around through the couple inches space,,,hard to engineer mentally without seeing the doors
or you could cover each window from inside with some solid panels (plywood etc.) and have each one hinged so they can be opened to allow light in whenever; also have some kind of securing mechanism on each so when the garage door is raised they stay put
or use a combination of solid panels and screen
and if you have the bux, electric glass http://www.electricglasswall.com/photo.htm

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-> I just had a rollup garage door installed that has windows which will allow -> daylight (good) and a view of the electronics and tools in my garage (bad). -> The windows that came with the door are clear glass. What can I use to -> obscure the view from outside without losing the natural light? -> -> Some searching came up with two potential solutions: 1) Spray on fogging -> paint, apparently available from craft stores; and 2) Aquarium crystal -> paint. -> -> I believe that any tinted or reflective film will work except that, at -> night, someone would be able to see into the lit garage. That's almost a -> good enough fix, but not quite. I also understand that I cannot add any -> appreciable weight to the door, so that rules out adding a thin sheet of -> bubbled light fixture panes (like on flourecent lights). -> -> I'd appreciate any shared experiences on this. Thanks.
Someone, somewhere sells a sort of plastic sheeting (much like shelf "paper") that is intended for use on bathroom windows. It give a frosted appearance when attached to the window.
Unfortunately, I don't recall where I've seen it.
--
8^)~~~ Sue (remove the x to e-mail)
~~~~~~
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-> -> -> I just had a rollup garage door installed that has windows which will -> allow -> -> daylight (good) and a view of the electronics and tools in my garage -> (bad). -> -> The windows that came with the door are clear glass. What can I use to -> -> obscure the view from outside without losing the natural light? -> -> -> -> Some searching came up with two potential solutions: 1) Spray on -> fogging -> -> paint, apparently available from craft stores; and 2) Aquarium crystal -> -> paint. -> -> -> -> I believe that any tinted or reflective film will work except that, at -> -> night, someone would be able to see into the lit garage. That's almost a -> -> good enough fix, but not quite. I also understand that I cannot add any -> -> appreciable weight to the door, so that rules out adding a thin sheet of -> -> bubbled light fixture panes (like on flourecent lights). -> -> -> -> I'd appreciate any shared experiences on this. Thanks. -> -> -> Someone, somewhere sells a sort of plastic sheeting (much like -> shelf "paper") that is intended for use on bathroom windows. It -> give a frosted appearance when attached to the window. -> -> Unfortunately, I don't recall where I've seen it. Ooooooooh. Check this out: http://www.decorativefilm.com /
--
8^)~~~ Sue (remove the x to e-mail)
~~~~~~
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
interesting film, the warehouse home improvement stores carry similar films in limited small sizes
sheet plastic or wax paper attached over the windows might also work to alter transparency while allowing light through

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
buy some frosted glass spray. "The winds of God are always blowing, but you must set the sails"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.comalot (Camster) wrote in

That spray is great. My hubby used it years ago and only now is it in need of a touch up. Marina
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I know WallWorld used to sell it. It was with all the other rolls of contact paper (do people still use that stuff?) made by Rubbermaid. They used to have a couple different "frosted" type ones. I used it years ago on my work truck to keep theives from "taking inventory".....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Suzie-Q wrote:

Yes, I got some of this at Home Depot. I had originally seen it advertised in a catalogue, but I couldn't find the catalog, so I went to Home Depot and asked for that clear/opaque contact paper that you can put up on bathroom windows for privacy. You can't see through it, but light does get through. I've used this on garage windows and bathroom windows. It's probably the least elegant, but also the least expensive, way of dealing with the problem. You could start out by trying it, and then if you'd prefer something else, you can just peel off the contact paper and try something else.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Magnusfarce wrote:

Since it is winter you need some additional insulation anyway. Just get regular plastic used for paint spatter (2-4 mil) which is milky and staple if you have a wood door or tape if you have a metal door. Look through the plastic to find a degree of translucency that you like.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/8/2005 12:44 AM US(ET), Magnusfarce took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

Take a run over to WalMart or any store that sells "Con-Tact" plastic shelving paper. They have a diamond patterned (peel and stick) semi-clear plastic film that can be used on window glass. I have it on one bathroom window that is next to a patio and it works great.
--
Bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/8/2005 7:49 AM US(ET), willshak took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

First, you have to cut me a little slack because of my age and CRS. I just realized that my garage door windows are covered with auto window tint that I installed myself some 20 years ago. They work great looking out during the day, but I can't see in too well. The only time you can see in pretty clearly, is when the garage lights are on. The film can be bought at any auto supply store like Autozone, CarQuest, etc. You can get it in many different colors and levels of opacity. Get the smoke tint unless you like the bronze or mirrored look of glass. Mine is the darker smoke shade, but not the real dark limo tint.
--
Bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 7 Jan 2005 21:44:24 -0800, "Magnusfarce"

What's your address. I'll come and remove all the tools and electronics. FREE OF CHARGE. Then you wont have to worry about it. <lol>
Seriously. Adding that light fixture plastic is NOT going to add much weight. That stuff weighs very little. The spray that you found will work too. Or, so it free. Get some free bubble wrap that they use for packaging and staple it on (assuming the door is wooden).
The glass is most likely plastic (plexiglass) that came with the door. If you want to get more complicated, they do sell frosted plexiglass. Replace the panels.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Magnusfarce wrote:

First, if you are in a creative mood, check out the craft stores for stain glass paint. Just add a little creativity and you can have a good looking results that also block vision well and not too much light.
From Michaels
http://www.michaels.com/art/online/displayProductPage?productNum=cp0002&channelid However for most, I suggest the self stick plastic stuff sold for bathroom windows. A number of places carry it, try your local home improvement store.
Home Depot has this listed under "window film."
http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS/EN_US/diy_main/pg_diy.jsp?CNTTYPE=PROD_META&CNTKEY=misc%2fsearchResults.jsp&BV_SessionID=@@@@0099482939.1105190566@@@@&BV_EngineIDeeadddiekkjlfcgelceffdfgidgnl.0&MID76--Joseph Meehan26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frosting a Window Mix Epsom Salt with stale beer until the beer can hold no more. Then, apply the mixture to the glass. When it dries the window will be frosted.
CL

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The spray on glass frosting available from most hardware stores and hobby centers works quite well. You will need a razor blade to remove it if you change your mind.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
well you could do like I did, car wax, but don't buff the haze.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
they used to use "GlassWax" like that. I think they still sell it on the oldfashioned type hardware stores. bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How about making some kind of "shades" for the windows? Assuming your door is metal, you could glue or tape some magnets to posterboard and "stick" the covers to the door when you want to block out the light. This gives you the advantage of being able to take the shades off to get the light in the garage when you want it.
If you really want to get fancy, you could sew some magnets into the edges of some cloth shades. Most craft stores sell strips of magnetic material. We used them to stick christmas cards to our metal doors for years.
If your doors are wood, you could probably install snaps, hooks, or some other method of attaching the shades to the door.
Good luck,
Anthony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Heat up your pot o "hide glue". Ladle some on any window, then stand back as she dries. It pings off the glass and gives frosted look.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.