How to fix leak in 5k gallon steel water tank on concrete pad

Page 2 of 3  

On Wed, 13 Jan 2010 07:33:51 -0800, "Roger Shoaf"

That a pretty small sample.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Ok, how about this? I've had HUNDREDS of radiators repaired over the last 30+ years and not a one of them ever developed a leak in another spot.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 14 Jan 2010 20:20:52 -0600, Steve Barker

Depends on what caused the leak. MOST radiator leaks that respond well to repairs are mechanical damage or joint failure. Repairing the mechanical damage or resoldering the split joint USUALLY make the rad virtually as good as new.
If a rad has corroded through from both sides and the fins have fallen off, soldering up the resulting leak is a stopgap repair at best.
Same with a water tank. A pourous weld? - fix it and it will LIOKELY last a long time. A stray bullet went through it? Fix it and it will last a long time. A rust blister due to damaged anti-corrosion coating on the outside (like paint)? Good chance a repaior will last. If the tank has corroded badly from the inside out, patching one hole may well be the first of a LONG string of repairs, few if any of which will be "successfull"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 14 Jan 2010 20:20:52 -0600, Steve Barker

Ok, how about this? If they sprang the leaks you repaired at an advanced age, due to corrosion rather than physical damage from something hitting them, you are either mistaken or lying.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

if the 'advanced age' or corrosion were a problem, then any *GOOD* radiator man would not repair it. And mine doesn't. He'll recommend a new core at about half the price of a new radiator.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 15 Jan 2010 10:40:24 -0600, Steve Barker

Try and keep up, will ya?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Roger Shoaf wrote:

Since it's a flat bottom it may be possible to replace the entire bottom if the rest of the tank is viable. Empty, even a tank that size isn't that difficult to lift.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 13 Jan 2010 11:00:10 -0600, Pete C. wrote:

Someone else suggested welding a new bottom on. Do they lift it up with a crane and then cut the bottom off and fabricate a new bottom?
Or do they tip it over on its side and weld the bottom on from the side?
I wouldn't want it rolling down the hill!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Godspeed wrote:

Either of those methods would probably work. A simpler method would probably be to just gradually jack it up a couple feet on cribbing and then work on replacing a section at a time, moving the cribbing as needed, since the replacement metal will be likely be in 4x8 sheets.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Godspeed wrote: ...

..
That's almost 10X an estimate for a tank alone I'd think; at least if it doesn't have to be potable (but even there I'm sure their available for much less than $20k @ 5000 gal.
Assuming you're in CA from the fire protection requirement, here's one link that might be of some interest--they have black poly from roughly the $2k range.
<http://www.watertanks.com/contact.asp
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 13 Jan 2010 12:26:39 -0600, dpb wrote:

I agree. The original estimate was wrong. The "poly" tanks appear to be about $2,000 (plus California 10% sales tax).
From this link, there appear to be only 3 manufacturers (Norwesco, Inc. of St. Bonifacius, Minnesota, Snyder Industries of Lincoln, Nebraska and RMI in Gardena, California). http://www.winebusiness.com/wbm/?go=getArticle&dataIdP707
They advertise a one to three year warranty for the poly tanks but say they can last 15 years or more.
The tanks I have are welded painted steel, not corrogated or galvanized. Looking that up, it appears the major players are "All State Tanks" of Grove, Oklahoma, and "Columbia TecTank" of Kansas City, Kansas, both of whom mostly erect the tanks in the field.
The web site above says "A 5,000 gallon steel tank may cost $3 per gallon" so that's what the well guy must be talking about when he told me it would be $20,000 to replace my 5,000 gallon steel tank.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Godspeed wrote:

I'd guess there are a number of other suppliers as well; there are several more in this area than those because of the demand for ag use tanks; depending on where in CA you are I'd expect the same for that purpose or for the specific purposes/needs you outline.
As for the various other options --
I'd still say odds are quite high that the cost of either the bladder if available or rigging and welding a new bottom will approach or exceed the cost of new poly tank.
It's always worth a shot to see if can use the temporary patch that could extend the life somewhat. My luck in welding on thin bottom of the smaller round tanks we use (for hauling water for cattle on pasture) has been mixed--some have turned out so thin burned thru and was given up on and others still had sufficient overall material w/ just a few pinholes. It'll all depend on what actually find if go in.
One thing wrt the longevity of the poly tanks -- I presuming you're in warm weather country otherwise you would have icing problems w/ them just outside w/ above ground piping. If so, the primary problem is likely UV even w/ the black poly; since these are stationary application you could undoubtedly extend lifetime by putting under roof and sun shade on south/west sides to minimize that cause for deterioration.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Godspeed wrote:

Most any weld shop can do it. Typical welder is about $75 to $100 an hour + materials + travel time.
If the leak is on the bottom, it may be difficult to get to. If there is one leak, there may be others. As I said, it has to be seen to be properly determined what action to take. It may just be a pin hole leak in one spot, it may be a pile of rust held together by paint.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 13 Jan 2010 22:52:29 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Do you think they can get to it from the inside or that they will have to get to it from the outside?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1 - Fill the tank with some really nasty stuff...maybe even plumb your toilets into it.
2 - Call Mike Rowe over at Dirty Jobs. He's always whining about running out of Dirty Jobs for his show.
Maybe they'll come out and fix it for free.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As a Journeyman welder and pipeline welder of 30 years, and as a few other posters said, drain it and weld it. I have come across this before...putting a patch on it will just prolong the enevitable. Cut the bottom off it and weld a new one on. I used to build 35-50 thousand gallon fuel tanks for the oil industry. Normal prodedure is after having replaced a tank bottom. The outside bottom is covered in thick tar to prevent rusting...doesn't really matter what it sits on then..ie wood, concrete, soil. Hope that helps... Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 13 Jan 2010 08:53:29 -0600, Jim wrote:

That's an interesting idea since it's the bottom that must be leaking.
One question is how to "move" the tank. It's on quarter-inch thick wood slats (most of which are eaten away by now). The other tank is on good quarter inch slats so I assume the rot from the water ate away the wood.
Can something like this be tipped over? It's on a hill so I'd worry about it rolling down the hill. Can the "bottom" be welded in place?
I guess straps can be used to hold it from rolling down the hill?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No Godspeed it can't be done on it's side... It's gotta be lifted straight up using a "gin pole" laying it on it's side will only egg shape it under its own weight. we lay them on their side after the bottom has been welded on and use a paint roller to apply the tar.... Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Better yet...EMail my welding business at ...... morriswelding at sasktel dot net ....send me photos and I'll coach you from there...I am home on time off (Wife is doing treatments after BEATING breast cancer) so am home and am looking for something to do to keep my mind busy...so I'll give you all the free advice you need while I'm sitting at home...Jim

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No one has mentioned chewing gum!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.