How to Fix a Leaky Steel Garden Shed?


I have a rusty steel garden shed in my backyard. Its roof has developed leaks. What's the good way to fix the leaks?
Of course, the best way is to repair it with something that won't rust. But that shed is too close to the property line and is currently grandfathered by the code. If I rebuilt it, I would have to keep the new shed far away from the property line to conform to the new code requirement. But my backyard is small; therefore, I really don't want to do this. All I can do now is to fix the steel shed, and I want to do this in a way that I don't need to keep going back to re- fix the fixed roof.
Any idea? Thanks in advance for any info.
Jay Chan
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Can you get away with putting up a roof over the existing shed supported by it's own poles kind of like you see as picnic shelter houses in parks. I've seen this done over old mobile homes. I knew of a guy who couldn't get a permit to build a new house on his river lot so he built a new house around the old (called it remodeling for which he could get a permit) and then dismantled the old house and carried it out the doors. Then he put up interior walls in the new house.
Tom G.
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I've done some mickey mouse fix with sheet metal and lots of liquid nails construction adhesive. You may be able to apply this up from inside, so the shed appearance remains the same. However, it's likely a corrugated roof. How about a roof coat of the silver stuff made for trailers?
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Jay Chan wrote:

You don't have to rebuild it, just repair it. With a "replacement" roof. Then, in a few weeks, a new door. Then a new wall. Then another. etc.
I saw a hatchet billed as the very hatchet used by young George Washington to chop down the legendary cherry tree.
The owner said in 250 years the hatchet had had its head replaced twice and the handle eight times, but other than that it was the original hatchet.
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Local lawyer, now a judge btw, bought a house and remodelled it. The story goes that ultimately only one original wall remained 'as was' but the house has been transformed entirely.
So some creative remodelling might be in order?
However more practically if it's mainly the roof leaking? Maybe one could secure some plywood to the existing structure; cover that with roll roofing (or regular asphalt shingles) etc. Next the existing rusty walls could be used, if structurally sound enough, as support for new siding to 'repair' it's appearance.
Modified trailers CAN be an eyesore blight on the landscape in a regular community of houses. However there is at least one here where if one is aware you can say "BTW there is a trailer buried inside that structure; but you wouldn't know it from the exterior view of the house".
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There's a corrugated roofing panel system called Ondura at the box stores now. Reasonable cost, long lasting non metallic, hammer and nail installation. IMO it would be perfect for your shed roof. Check it out.
Joe
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wrote:

There's a corrugated roofing panel system called Ondura at the box stores now. Reasonable cost, long lasting non metallic, hammer and nail installation. IMO it would be perfect for your shed roof. Check it out.
Joe
Gesh..Did anyone READ the O P. He said he had an old STEELE shed. The sheetmetal ones you get from Sears for a couple of hundred bucks and bolt together..The type the wind usually destroys long before they rust out. LOL..
Like somebody already said...Get a tube of roofing cement for your caulking gun and fill the gaps and holes and then get a gallon can of that silver stuff for trailor roofs and brush the whole roof with it. Just keep the kids away from it for a while...LOL...
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If the floor is good. Just flip it upside down.
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Use some ice garde it's like tar paper with a stick on backing.It will stick to wood,tin ,leaves ,bugs ,even your shorts It worked on mine Jerry
http://community.webtv.net/awoodbutcher/MyWoodWorkingPage
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On Aug 1, 11:39pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Jerry - OHIO) wrote:

Thanks for everyone who have replied to my post.
Seem like I should try the easiest way first -- using roofing cement to fill all the leaks. If this doesn't work, I will try using the ice- garde that you have suggested.
Jay Chan
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Jay Chan wrote:

Roofing cement may make it a year. I'd buy the closest matching corrugated metal roofing I could find, and a box of gasketed self-tapping screws, and lay another layer of metal over it. The place that sells the roofing will usually cut it to length for you, for a small fee. They will also have the properly shaped and gasketed cap rail to put along the peak.
-- aem sends...
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