How to find a good contractor?

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Check building permits at local building department. Look at residential projects similar in size and scope as yours. Check by the site and ask the owners. Going back several few months in permit dates will likely yield projects that are recently completed.
Try to get by soon enough to get fresh information. After a year, you are likely to get more generalized opinions and/or minor grievances that are disproportionally critical.
Jim

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In many places in the US you will need a permit, and to get a permit, you will have to show them satisfactory plans. So your first step is to find someone to design this and draw up the plans; ask him for recommendations as to a contractor.
Alexander Galkin wrote:

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I will draw the plan and take care of all permits. I have pretty much experience with applying for permits and inspections. My township local inspectors know me in person as they visited my house several times each inspecting previous projects. I need a contractor to perform a very specific job: excavate soil for addition, build foundation and possible frame floor. I don't need anything else and I will be doing rest myself. Obviously I do not need GC.

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message

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You coulda posta ina alta HVACa , they are bueno at this especialy seniour
{{{{{{(( --++:!@.. " PJM " ..@!:++-- ))}}}}}} " THE ASSSSSSSSS from the past "
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Alexander Galkin wrote:

You probably will need an engineer's stamp on the plans - ask your engineer who he/she thinks is a good contractor for the type of work you need. He may not be able to tell you who is the least expensive, or who completes the job in the least time, but he's been on lots of site inspections and knows who follows the plans, whose workmanship is good.
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If its NOT a public building, but just your home, or even in many cases, calif for example, a factory you will not need an engineers stamp for most of that or any of it some cases...depends on the impact issues and local codes, if its a public use building or not....thats if you are an owner builder.
the rules can change if you are a contractor..but not always.. its a regional issue.
In your case you can most likely draw up your own plans, take it to the city and they will probably approve them..especially if they are obviously competent...if they look flakey, then the city will insist on a competent set of plans.
Phil Scott

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Make sure you have a FULL set of plans, mechanical, electrical and plumbing. Make the subs bid off the plans then if they choose, give an alternate very detailed bid. It is the only way you can compare apples to apples. A good web site is www.HVAC-consult.com

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There's a good contractor?
Dimitri
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D. Gerasimatos wrote:

Yes, in Greek mythology.
Matt
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To find a good contractor you should talk to past customers and I mean a few years after the job was completed. Also don't go to a contractor who builds new houses if you just want a small addition 'cause they may tend to push your job to the background while they go after the big ones.
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On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 21:03:46 -0500, "Alexander Galkin"

Ask around the neighborhood. Word of mouth is the best referral you can get. One caveat though. Look at the work the GC did. Your standards may be different than your neighbors'.
------------------------------------------=o&>o---- Steve Manes, Brooklyn, USA www.magpie.com
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Steve Manes wrote:

I also do a reverse search on candidate contractors' phone numbers. If you have to sue the guy, you need to have an address.
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Alexander Galkin wrote:

I would start by studying up on all the work to be done, including soil/drainage/settling issues. Heat/AC limits or needs. Construction materials and methods. You can't negotiate a project like yours without knowing your options and areas for concern. Look at some new houses for ideas. Check around the neighborhood for a house that has had an addition and knock on the door :o) Then, go to your state, city or county website and find three contractors who have held licenses for at least 10 years. Check for complaints or discipline against their licenses, and start getting bids. Bid should include license and insurance info, material type and brand, completion time, payment intervals, lien release info, etc.
Our city has construction standards, with detailed drawings, for all kinds of projects. This is their standard for city work, done by city engineers and available on the internet. Good resource, IMO.
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