How to Fill a Crack in Ceramic Tile?

We just recently bought a house here in Florida with ceramic tile floors in parts of the house. There are a few "hairline" cracks across perhaps 6 or 7 of the tiles, several of which are fairly noticeable because they are in an area near the kitchen that we walk over every day. Unfortunately, the tiles are not "through-body color porcelain tiles," so chips and cracks are more obvious because of the color difference.
It seems to me that there ought to be some sort of "filler" that could be used to fill a crack ... perhaps glue-based that could be colored to match the color of the tile. It would need to be extremely liquid, so that it would flow into even a hairline crack. Ideally, once cured, the filler would be somewhat pliable so that it could stretch slightly if the crack continued to widen.
Anyone know of such a product? (I really don't expect a perfect answer to my question, but I had to ask it anyway!) Maybe there's an ingenius inventor out there somewhere that could concoct such a product, assuming one doesn't exist already.
Anybody tried watering down fingernail polish with acetone?
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no. the right way is to take up the tiles, fix the problem under the tiles (and there is a cause of the problem), replace with new tiles and regrout.
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John writes:

You have cheap tile with a cheap installation. Nothing is going to improve that or fully repair the problem.
"Chase" the cracks and then fill with epoxy or grout. You can experiment with blends of colored grouts to get somewhat of a match for color. Nobody is going to sell you a color match. But you're always going to see the cracks. Latex paint will fill truly hairline cracks, if you only want cosmetic improvement.
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

Well there's useless, overbroad and wrong info.
I'd say $TheAbove, or you have old tile. Or some failing underneath it. Or settling of the house. or about a billion other things.

Replacing the tiles is the BEST bet. Doing so after figuring out if the underfloor ahs an issue will avoid repeats.
One thing you might consider is the fill thing, but swap tiles (if you don't have/can't get a replacement).
I had some cracked tiles in a bathroom in the middle. Switched them with tiles that were behind the toilet. It was a rental and the tile was from the 50s and impossible to match. I didn't want to retile.
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Chuck Yerkes writes:

Thanks for your analysis.

The OP asked for repair techniques. "Replace it" is not an answer to that question.
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We once moved into a house that had an almond-colored ceramic tile floor in the kitchen that had several hairline cracks and numerous tiny chips that revealed the color below the surface of the tile. The best solution we found for the cracks was an almond-color elastomer-type caulk forced into the crack, then quickly wiped off the surface of the tile. For all the little dings, we used one or more applications of almond-colored appliance touch-up enamel. These repairs were almost undetectable unless you were very close to the floor. The repairs never needed to be re-done in the seven years we lived there.
--
Wayne in Phoenix

If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
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