How to fasten a bottom plate to a concrete floor?

I removed one wall in preparation to building two to replace it. The bottom plate was not fastened in any way to the concrete floor. That was nice because I didn't have to rip it up, but seems inadequate.
Is that considered an acceptable method, or should I fasten it? Is construction adhesive adequate (should be better than nothing...) or do I have to go with anchors of some sort; specifically?
As long as I have your attention. One wall is going to butt up to an existing wall that is drywalled. I was just going to leave the drywall, and glue the end stud to it, since it doesn't happen to hit at a stud. Not very strong, but I don't see that it needs any more than that. Is that reasonable?
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the new wall(s) should be fastened in some sort of way. you dont want it "floating" around do you? use construction adhesive and fasteners. do it right the first time. dont use the old "cut nails" for attaching tho. tap-cons are nice n easy. know a friend with a hilti gun? as for the other part, couldnt tell you. i know i wouldnt do it that way. id cut the wall open, get some wood in there, then drywall. the only thing holding that joint together throu the course of the stud is the paper on the sheetrock. you can tie in the top and bottom, but what about the rest? someone bumps that corner, get a little aggressive moving a dresser or desk, whatever.

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Get a hammer drill and concrete bit to match the anchors you buy. They make anchors that open against the concrete as you tighten them, I do not recall their name, but I used them on my garage when I placed it on an existing cement floor. so I could not put threaded rods into the pour.

to a stud, or remove the last section of drywall. You got to drywall the new wall anyhow (I assume). What's a couple more inches. Then add TRIPLE studs in there to attach your new wall and enough left over for the drywall to attach to (or double studs and lots of scrap 2x4 pieces for the drywall).
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I second the notion of using tapcons. Use the larger ones (hex heads). I think they're #10 or thereabouts. They're easy to install. Bore some holes in the floor plate (before you install it), install temporarily and use the proper size carbide bit to drill thru the holes to mark the concrete. Remove the floor plate and finish drilling. Reinstall floor plate and insert fasteners.
You can bypass the remove/reinstall step, if you can manage to clear the holes properly thru the floor plate.

No. You'll be unhappy with the result. If nothing else, you'll have breaks in the drywall job at the joint.
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Toller wrote:

Rent a gun that shoots nails into concrete. Lots simpler than all the drilling etc that others have suggested. Your local lumber yard will have one and will supply the correct charge cartridges. Actually, if you can get the concrete clean, just liquid nails will be sufficient if the framing is tight.
Harry K
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For a short wall that well anchored at both ends and is not load bearing, I would be tempted to skip anchoring the bottom plate as well. But otherwise, hit it with tapcons or expansion anchors into holes drilled into the concrete: you do not want the wall waggling when someone leans up against it.

Again, if it's just a basement remodel sort of job, and both walls are well anchored top and bottom, then yeah, you could get away with this sort of joint. Put some moulding into the corner to cover for the inevitable movement. But you're taking a short cut that won't look good. Open up the eixsting wall, frame into it and tie everything together. You don't need to pile a ton of studs in the corner if you use drywall clips. That's what I'd do if I wanted it to really look great and last.
John
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The gun powder charge nail guns will fasten the bottom plate to the slab. Beware that concrete continues to harden over the years. I cracked a 40 year old slab with the nail gun. Drilled holes and bolts would have been safer.
-rev
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