How to dry flooded laminate floor?

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Our office with laminate flooring was slightly flooded by an out of order sprinkler outside the building.
We have mopped off the water on the floor. However, there is still water underneath the floor. Stepping on certain areas would squeeze out some water.
Do we have to tear out the whole floor to remove those water, or would the water drain down through the foundation? Is there any company specializing in this type of work?
The building is a 1-story commercial building.
Here are some photos showing the water on the floor: http://photographs.smugmug.com/gallery/8337471_B5x7A/1/546490040_VYoRq
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How much is your deductable.
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How long had the water been sitting?
The water is trapped between the slab & the laminate ....get someone (you?) after it with a shop vac.
After you get readily vac'd water, prop the vac floor style nozzle in the "lowest" spot, leave it running and it will draw the water to it.
Set up a couple 20" box fans & also turn up the heat.
Of course there are water damage / flooding cleanup companies but they charge an arm & a leg...since their typical MO is to screw some insurance company.
As Ransley mentioned....insurance deductible? cheers Bob
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replying to fftt, JANINE price wrote: hi i have semae thing in my bedroom and lifting up slightly and see huge bubbles under it what is a shop vac
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Oren posted for all of us...

That sucks!
--
Tekkie

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OP is better off just replacing the laminate flooring.
if theres ANY CHANCE this may occur again replace the laminatewith something much more durable, thats not bothered by water
polished concrete is near indestructible, and fairly cheap. terrazo last forever expensive but just about indestructible
theres ceramic tile that looks like wood. more expensive than laminate, but lasts near forever.
some vinyl tile is extremely durable, and looks good
theres a wide variety of alternatives
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wrote:

I like sheet vinyl linoleum -- no leaking through there -- except when you roll a chair while sitting on it, it tends to separate the top layer with the pattern from the layer underneath. Maybe that's less likely with better quality, and maybe impossible if the pattern goes all the way through, but they don't sell Congoleum anymore.
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james wrote:

Removing the laminate shouldn't be too hard. Mark the pieces on the back so you'll know where to replace them.
Depending on the laminate, the water may not bother it at all.
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James,
IMO, it has to come up and be replaced for all the reasons stated by the other posters. The risk of mold and all that involves is far too great to make any half-way remediation practical.
Colbyt
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Colbyt wrote:

Good grief! Tear up a floor to prevent mold? How 'bout we wait to see if it gets moldy? I'd try my damndest to dry it out first. But, then, I wouldn't have a pretend-wood floor in the first place.
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wrote:

No, you'd be tearing up the floor to dry it out and replace the warped boards. While you're in there you investigate the extent of the flood, the moisture content of the concrete and remaining boards, and possibly clean the area with TSP or some other mold killer. Anything else is crossing your fingers and clicking your heels three times.
R
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Things like this is the reason I keep a notebook with tile type paint colors etc. Replacing this kind of flooring is a pretty easy DIY project.
Jimmie
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Yeah, the OP's floor looked fairly new, and it didn't seem to be anything exotic, so he might luck out and find it's still available.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

With "cheap" laminate, there won't be any "warped" boards. The stuff is (mostly) plastic or similar.
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As already noted, you can see the swollen edges of the board. Mostly plastic doesn't mean it has no wood. If it has wood, it will swell when the water hits the wood.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

Ah, yes. I see. He used the expensive stuff. But, if the wood's purpose is as a filler, water might not affect it. If, for example, the company mixed wood dust with the plasticizer, the result wouldn't be particularily vulnerable to water.
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The edges have clearly swollen in the pictures. Discussing theoretical situations is pointless.
I also don't understand your comment about the relative cost being dependent on whether it has wood fiber in the product. The cheapest stuff out there has wood fiber in it.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

I was trying to distinguish between real, solid wood (the expensive stuff), and the faux wood made of sawdust and plasticizer.
There're at least two kinds of laminate: Solid (or veneer) wood with an indestructible finish and some composite material covered with (essentially) wallpaper, then coated with the bullet-proof stuff.
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replying to norminn, Njs wrote: 'I wouldnt jave a pretend wood floor' what a twatish response.
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Ouch. You can see that the laminate flooring has swelled up at the edges in places. That will never lay back down. Those boards will have to be replaced at the very least. It's probably safe to assume that more will swell up. The legs of the wood furniture will also wick up the water ans start swelling or blowing off the finish. You should never let stuff sit in water. I trust you just took those pictures as evidence and then proceeded to promptly vacuum up as much of the water as you could.
Most commercial buildings I have worked on had sealed concrete slabs. You cannot rely on the concrete absorbing much water. I'd remove all of the flooring back to where there is no more water in evidence. A moisture meter would help determine how saturated the laminate and concrete are, and would tell you when you had removed enough flooring. Put the furniture up on some plastic blocks. Dry the place out with fans, dehumidifiers, and/or sweeping compounds. An AC on a continuous run will extract a lot of moisture. Meticulously clean everything before anything goes back down. The worst thing you could do is to put new flooring back down before the place is back to being bone dry. Once mold starts growing it's a bitch to get rid of it.
You are looking at an insurance claim. You are probably looking at a number higher than your deductible. Whether you want to make the claim and risk affecting your premiums will depend on how much higher. R
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