How to drain the first part of the water pipe, in the basement

How to drain the first part of the water pipe, in the basement?
I've been following the instructions for freeze-proofing the house when someone goes away during the winter, but I don't understand how to drain one pipe. The water comes in about 3 feet above the floor, then goes up a bit to the valve, and then up to the ceiling, 8 feet above the floor.
Then across the ceiling etc. and down to the laundry sink. So if I close the main valve and open the sink, the pipes on the ceiling will drain, but what about the first part, from where it comes in to the ceiling? If it gets below freezing, wouldn't that burst?
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Well there are a few issues here. In many areas it is not likely to be a problem. What is ground level? If this pipe is coming in well below ground level in a basement, then it is not likely to freeze unless you leave the windows to the basement open. A basement, even in sub zero weather will stay above freezing under almost any condition. The ground temperature will help keep it warm. That is the same reason the pipe is not likely to freeze outside the basement.
Building designs can vary so this will not always be the case.
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Joseph Meehan

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open fitting where line enters building might install or check if valve has drain, a small threaded fitting in side of valve, it unscrews.
its good to prepare for disaster but bad to intentially let a home freeze.
plaster can be destroyed, and lots of other troubles.
like water traped in dishwasher and washing machines
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mm wrote:

Is there an outside valve, like next to the meter?
If so, close that and leave the interior valve open (after draining the pipes).
It's not the freezing of the water that does the damage - it's the expansion of the ice that ruptures the pipes. If the expansion has somewhere to go, i.e., up the pipes, then the expansion shouldn't be a problem.
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