How to drag large garbage can?

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Joe Carthy wrote:

Depends on how the lot was graded, and how much further downhill the lot went past the house. Rainwater running into garage and basement can be an expensive PITA. But if the house is in a bowl, the whole damn thing can flood. If at all possible, you want the house to be the highest point on the lot. But as I have learned from sad experience, having a driveway that rises around 8 feet over a 60-foot run, can also be a problem if you live in snow country. After losing one transmission, I now have resigned myself to plowing before trying to get up the drive, if I can't see the pavement through the snow. I suppose that is one of the reasons this place sat empty for six months before I bought it at a discount.
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When I lived in Vermont (classifies as "snow country" ;-), our driveway was like that. No big problem at all. It sure beats a driveway sloped the opposite direction. At least I could get home (before removing the snow) without worrying about losing the garage door. Snow melts, too.
How in the world did you lose a transmission?
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keith wrote:

My driveway slopes up from street to house. Driveway is asphalt. Until I realized FWD transmissions (esp mopar minvans) were not as solidly built as RWD transmissions back in the old days, if there was only a couple inches of snow, I would sometimes drive uphill through the snow. Made it through about 1.5 winters before tranny told me that was a bad thing to do. At that point, the value of the van with a good tranny was the same as the cost to rebuild the tranny. I have a snowblower and a good leaf blower now, so I seldom have to hand shovel very much. But I do have to get up half an hour early on snowy days to clear drive, even for only a couple inches, because if I drive out over it (which presumably does no harm), I have 2 stripes of ice to contend with at the end of the day.
The best-remembered lessons are the expensive ones, etc. I'm sure an AWD or 4wd baby SUV would have no trouble with this driveway, nor would an old-style RWD with actual snow tires in rear (not 'all season') and a few sandbags in trunk.
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Same. Makes the garage door harder to hit. ;-)

I had a couple of minivans, though they were standards. I also had a couple of intrepids, no issues with snow. The trannies were junk (on all Chrysler crap), but I still don't understand how a little snow got to them.

Yep, my '93 TSi got scrapped because of the tranny, too. The '96 Intrepid got sold at auction before it got that far (we chickened out).

Yeah, I had a snow blower, too. If I got any ice on the driveway it tended to last all Winter. I did usually have to shovel out the end of the driveway, though. That stuff would be either as hard as a rock, or slush. Either would plug up the snow blower.

I still don't know what was so tough on the tranny. Spinning wheels is counterproductive.
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Especially in Nashville
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Chuckle. Try living in a lake-front house on most man-made lakes. Hill slump is a big problem, and you have to design the utility feeds and foundations accordingly.
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Good point. I was thinking about doing just that in a few years. Maybe not.
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On 5/3/2010 11:22 PM, Walter E. wrote:

In our town, people with disabilities are not required to bring the trash cans to the curb. You might call the town and explain that it is not feasible for you to bring the cans to the curb. I suspect (in light of all the disability laws) that they will have someone fetch them for you.
Regards,
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OMIGAWD, THERE ARE REASONABLE INTELLIGENT PEOPLE HERE WHO CAN READ! Kudos, George.
Steve
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-snip-

I'd be willing to bet you're not the only 80yr old with a long driveway your hauler has ever come across. Give them a call & see if they have an idea.
I'd probably end up building something like a walker with good sized swivel tires so all I had to contend with was forward motion- not holding the weight on 2 wheels.
Got an old golf cart lying around?
Jim
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Walter E. wrote:

Paved drive? Could buy or build a small cart to take stuff up the hill. We have the monster cans with wheels, but they are in the lot and the city rolls them out to the truck. I would not consider filling a standard garb. can, much less the monster cans, and trying to maneuver it by myself. The solution might be to have an enclosure at the top of the hill for the cans and take smaller batches of trash to the cans there.
I'm not 80, but I can almost see it from here. No 80 y/o has any business trudging up a hill with a load like you describe...gotta plan for your own safety, above all else. A garden cart will take plenty in one batch up the hill to empty there. Hauling a heavy can with an arm out the window of your car is likely to get you a broken arm, or worse.
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

I had a similar problem and I decided to start a mulch pile in a remote corner of my property. Mostly grass clippings and small bush cuttings. That took care of most of the heavy stuff. A neighbor complained about it to the code enforcement people. They came out and said I had a great idea and they started to encourage all rural folks to do the same.
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Chuck wrote:

Good job! A lot of places won't take grass clippings and other garden waste. Although I like the compost idea, I'm sort of stuck wondering if that compost stuff wouldn't help the landfill compost most of the paper type waste?
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Put a sign on it:
Do not remove under penalty of law.
nb
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Not true! Taking things "easy" is how you become decrepit. My 86 year old mother regularly hikes (even with recent foot surgery), works out every day, and does all her own yard work. Dragging the cans to the curb every week is a given. And she's only 110 lbs at 5 ft. Man up already.
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h wrote:

I'll bet your mom doesn't haul 200# loads. More power to her. There is a big difference between being active and taking chances. 80 y/o bones break easily, and don't heal as easily. I've become much more aware of fall hazards around the house, and have made my home safer. I do a lot of physical work and hope always to be able to do so.
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wrote in message

I disagree. Her wheelbarrow is nearly as large as she is, yet she fills it full up with dirt/gravel/whatever, and hauls it all over the yard. Could easily be 200lbs. Again, if you don't use it, you lose it. Weight resistance builds bone strength/density. She fell on the ice last year and not only did she not break anything, she didn't even bruise. Her solution to slipping on the ice wasn't to get someone to do her shoveling for her, she bought crampons to slip on over her boots. She has someone plow the driveway, but she like to shovel the front and back walkways - she says it "keeps her young".
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h wrote:

As I said before, there is a big difference between healthy exercise and taking chances. As active as many elderly are, a broken hip can mean permanent disability or death. As a retired nurse, I have seen it many, many times. Just keeping mental track, I figured over the years that the most common cause of falls for elderly that resulted in broken hips was...hurrying to the restroom.
My mom gave herself a present for her 80th and hired someone to clean her eavestroughs for her. They did not do a satisfactory job, so she resumed climbing on a ladder and doing it herself (single story home).
My husband is exceedingly strong, but when he isn't around and I want to do something that requires moving something heavy, I engineer it. Fitness does not equal foolishness...if the trip is a long one, there is no reason to risk a fall on ice or a back injury toting a heavy load. Taking more, smaller loads increases exercise and reduces chance of strain. As others have suggested, using vegetative waste for mulch is also a good idea.
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Bottom line, when you stop doing things for yourself, just dig a hole and lie down, since you're already dead. Meaning, that if you are not exercising VIGOROUSLY for at LEAST 60 MINUTES EVERY day, you aren't doing anything and should just give it up. Exercising (weight resistance training) actually builds up bones and guards against breaks, even in advanced old age, as any nurse should know. You can get the exercise moving your trash, your dirt, cleaning your house, your gutters, dancing, taking yoga or boxing classes, or going to the gym. Work it out on your own, but most people will die much sooner than they should because they never get off their asses. Most people, Americans in particular, are lazy.
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h wrote:

Your English comprehension isn't too good...who suggested that anyone stop being active?
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