How to cut trim already on the wall?

I have a piece of furniture I want flush against the drywall. However, I have 3/4" trim along the floor which prevents it from being flush. I want to notch-out an existing piece of trim.
How can I cut trim nicely that's already glued/nailed to the wall?
I thought about a wood chisel and a hammer, but I think it would look like a woodchuck did it.
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you only see it when you move the furniture...
randy
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Bill wrote:

A veneer saw or similar ought to do it if you have patience. You could tack a thin strip of wood to the trim you are removing right on the line you want to cut and use it as a guide to keep the saw blade in a nice straight line.
Something like one of these saws ought to work:
http://www.fine-tools.com/divsae.htm
If the furniture isn't heirloom and can stand it, could you just notch the lower back of it to clear the trim? (Don't lower the water, raise the bridge.)
HTH,
Jeff
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mark the trim straight...since it is finished already, it would be good to score it with a razor knife on theline....then go at it with a rotozip with a steady hand.....cut *to* the line....i do this alot in older homes when cabinetry is added and they don't want to trash old trim that is no longer available...
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On 10 Nov 2004 01:58:41 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comREMOVE (Chris Perdue) wrote:

Or a Dremel tool. Might also do the woodchuck thing within a quarter inch of the mark, and then use the Dremel to clean up the remainder.
--JWW
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I've had very good sucess using a Dremel w/ a roto-tool type bit. You have to work slowly and be very careful.
Strato
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If the trim is at the floor (as per OP) or ceiling, how do you finish up the section that the rotozip can't reach? A chisel?
Cheers, Wayne
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I cut it entirely with the rotozip...the rotozip is a very versatile tool and i used one daily(cabinetry and trim work)....
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and i

Wayne,
Chris is right it can be done. I usually have to remove the guide to do it and it takes a light touch. Be sure to wear eye protection as the bits are easily broken when doing free hand work.
Colbyt
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thanks Colbyt, i should have mentioned removing the "foot" from the rotozip....
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Proper use of a chisel will do the job. Make sure your chisel is VERY sharp and practice on something so you know which way it will work for you instead of against you..............unless you are proficient at Chisel usage this can be tricky.
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a
There is a dovetail saw that will do 90% of the job. You can get the last little bit very well, but a chisel will fix that easily when the first part is removed.
The saw is about $10 at Home Despot.
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