How to cut into existing sprinkler pipe

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I am extending my sprinkler system. I can do it by tapping into an existing underground circuit of 3/4" PVC pipe.
All I need to do is insert a PVC T into the existing pipe. I can cut the old pipe, but how can I insert a T in this space between the immovable ends of the cut pipe.
Is there a special Tee that can be slipped in there?
Thank you
Walter
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I'm not aware of special Tees, but there is a special coupler made for tight places, and it slips all the way over the pipe. you have to mark the pipe so you center it when you glue it. You'll have to dig a foot or so along the pipe. Then cut and remove maybe 6 inches of pipe. Clean all the pipes, Glue the tee on the cut out piece and slide the coupler over one of the underground cut ends. Cut the piece to fit in between the cut ends. Glue the tee in place. Then apply glue and slide that coupler in place so it's centered. There has to be room under the pipe to apply glue without dirt contamination.
I've worked as a plumber and used this method in buildings. I have not worked on sprinkler systems, so before you do anything, you might contact a sprinkler company. They might have some sort of saddle tee fitting that I am not aware of. That would be easier to apply, if such a thing exists.
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walter wrote:

1. Dig out about 24" along each part of the pipe where you plan to cut
2. Cut pipe
3. Cut one part of pipe shorter by as much as will be taken up by the part of the "T" where the cut ends won't be.
4. Lift pipes up and support
5. Dope and put on one end of the "T"
6. Dope the other end of the "T" and lower the pipes so the end slides into the "T"
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On 1/7/13 3:00 AM, walter wrote:

Take a look here
http://www.sprinklerwarehouse.com/Sprinkler-System-Pipe-Repair-s/4213.htm
or
http://tinyurl.com/acfo7lq
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I'd like to add to Steve's solution. These couplers are also made with a threaded tap in middle that you can attach the additional branch to. go to Home Depot and describe what you want ---- an inline compression coupler with an output tap..... For 1 inch PVC you can expect to pay 6 or 7 dollars, but they work very well..
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I would not use SharkBites underground. As the earth applies pressure to them, especially if the ground freezes, they could become detached.
On a job, I encountered a SharkBites come detached inside a wall because it fed the shower head and was resting exactly right against a piece of wall bracing. The people who lived there probably pulled down on the shower head, and it came undone inside the wall. Personally, I dont think much of them, and wont use them in my home.
A compression fitting is probably a good solution, although I've not used them on plastic pipes except plastic supply tubes under sinks.
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On Jan 8, 2:33 am, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

I've had the compression fittings fail if the pipes were free to move laterally. The constant pressure just slides the pipe out the ends. However, if the pipes cannot move, they work extremely well.... I've never used SharkBites. They just seem ..... flimsy....... to me. But I have heard good things about them. I guess it depends on the circumstances of the pipes..... Note that there are different styles of SharkBites for the various pipes they connect..... and the packages are often not well marked as to pipe types..... and the sales personnel often know less about their application than the customer.... Using a PVC style on blue polybutyl will eventually fail....
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wrote:

Good question. I have a Ewing irrigation near me that the sprinkler pro's go to as well as a Home Depot but when I have this type problem I go to Ewing Irrigation because they know the business and it's cheaper than Home Depot.
Just a guess.... maybe 2 short radiator (rubber) hoses with 2 screw on clamps slipped over each side of the Tee and on the corresponding end of the pvc pipe and then screw the clamps tight. I guess the only thing you have to be sure of is that the rubber won't break down in the soil over time and that the clamps won't rust.
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wrote:

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-100174071/h_d2/ProductDisplay?catalogId053&langId=-1&keyword=compression+coupling&storeId051 I have used KBI cpc-0750, upc code 0 11651 25700 2 made in USA, for3/4" successfully several times.
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Walter-
Forget all the complicated / hard work suggestions offered so far.....
use a glue on snap Tee, they work!
http://flexpvc.com/cart/agora.cgi?product=PVC-Tees-Snap-Pressure
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wrote:

That's the first time I've seen those. That's a great idea. That would be easy. Just make sure the pipe is cleaned real well before gluing.
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On Jan 8, 2:38 am, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Neat !! Looks to me like a few minutes with an ordinary hacksaw can make one of those out of a conventional T.....
I'd probably put two band clamps , one on each end, in addition to gluing, but I might just be overcautions.....
I'd hesitate before using it with primary water lines, but wouldn't worry about it in a sprinkler system.... What'll those Meskins think of next ???? :>))))
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There are "pressure rated" snap Tees & non-pressure rated ones.
I only buy & use the pressure rated ones. I've never used them on supply lines, only on sprinkler lines.
The snap Tees I linked to snap over the pipe for a "more than 180 degree" fit. Keep your fingers & skin on your hand out of the way.... they can pinch. No need for secondary clamps.
I've made test assemblies & pressure tested to 110 psi (water pressure at work) ... they held!
Using snap Tees to add a sprinkler head or tie into a sprinkler line makes a messy / time consuming job a breeze.
Toro makes them & Home Depot (in SoCal) used to carry generic ones. The Toro ones at Ace Hardware are ridiculously expensive. The ones on line are so cheap that I use them exclusively to lay out new sprinkler circuits. I just place & glue up the pipe and come back after the fact placing the snap Tees.
The only potential problem is drilling out the pipe wall. I use a collar stop on the drill bit to avoid damaging the pipe wall opposite the snap Tee.
cheers Bob
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Or,
Glue 90 degree elbows to your new tee fitting in the comfort of your shop.
Dig the hole, remove the piece of sprinkler pipe, glue 90 elbows on each end of the gap.
Now the 90s will match straight on. (use short piece of PVC between them).
This requires one tee, 4 elbows. Foolproof. You have to dig a wider hole.
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Great idea. If you have enough space, this is probably the simplest way of adding a tee to a buried sprinkler line.
Another option is to use a tee and two couplings that do not have the internal stops. If you can't find couplings without stops, you could always use a dremel tool to grind away the stop inside regular couplings.
Cut out a section of the buried pipe. Then glue up the tee and a couple stubs of pipe to precisely fit the section that was cut out. Put marks on the pipe so you know where to position the couplings (without the stops the marks are the only way to know you have it centered on the joint). Slide the couplings onto each stub and hold the tee assembly where it needs to be. Apply the PVC cleaner and glue, and slide the coupling over to make the connection. Repeat with the other side. It would probably be smart to slide the coupling over and give it a brief turn before holding as the glue sets. You could use a spring clamp on one side to hold everything in position while you work on the other side.
I used this method to add tee's to underground 4" gutter drains and it worked very well.
Anthony Watson Mountain Software www.mountain-software.com/about.htm
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Thanks for the info. I never knew such things existed, and I'm going to get a couple just to try out.
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wrote:

I was thinking about putting a stop on the drill bit too. It would be too easy to drill out the other side.....
I dont know if cutting a regular tee would work, I kind of think these are made to expand, the regular ones would probably crack.
If I ever have to add to a 3" or 4" PVC sewer stack again, I will definately keep this in mind. In the past I've fought with them to try to force a tee in the pipe, which meant attempting to lift the whole stack, and in most cases just did not work. That meant using fernco couplers instead. I guess my only concern about using these on large diameter pipe like that would be what kind of drill bit to use. You cant just make a 2 inch hole if it's for a toilet. The only thing I can think of, is to cut the hole first, with a saw.
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On 1/8/2013 11:22 AM, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

hole saw
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On Jan 8, 10:22am, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

For DWV pipe you can use the non-pressure rated snap Tees. You can remove the pipe wall using a hole saw.
cheers Bob
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wrote:

I haven't seen anyone suggest telescoping splices. Add a 'T' to one side, cut the pipe and insert. I used a couple of the telescoping splices where the gas company dug up my irrigation system. Worked like a champ.
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