How to cut heavy fence wire?

I am replacing the railings on a deck and plan to use heavy fence wire. This is a welded wire, galvanized, very heavy guage. It doesn't bend (much) and comes in 4' x 16' panels rather than rolls.
I need to make a lot of cuts to get smaller pieces to fit into the railing.
What is the best way to cut this material? One seller recommended bolt cutters. I suppose I could use a sawzall with a fine-toothed blade but that sounds laborious. Another friend has recommended an angle grinder.
What works well?
Thanks!
Guy
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Guy Scharf wrote:

The obvious answer is a hack saw, a good blade does it fast. But a bolt cutter does it a lot faster. Get an 18" bolt cutter from Harbor Freight ($7 when on sale). Fast and good for anything upto 1/4." I've used it on wire 2x4" fabric which I think is about 12 or 10 gauge and you hardly know when you cut.
If you have somebody to help hold the stuff an angle grinder would work very fast. Forget the sawsall, even a hand hack saw will be easier for one person.
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Bolt cutters would be quick, but leave sharp ends, which might need to be ground down for safety/aesthetic reasons.
Forget the sawzall -- you'll go through a bazillion blades (been there/done that, with rebar). Forget the hacksaw for the same reason.
You can get a metal-cutting blade for a skilsaw. Works well, but makes a TON of sparks . Probably similar to the angle grinder, which I don't own.
-Tim
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Get a pair of heavy dykes to cut the wire.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Now there's an idea. I understand that AMUN rents his wife and daughter out for this very thing. You can just sit back and watch.
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G Henslee wrote:

Sorry, meant "dikes", as in electrical. Worked for me.
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get a good set of bolt cutters

Sorry, meant "dikes", as in electrical. Worked for me.
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wrote:

I think you meant to say "diagonal cutting pliers".
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AKA "Dikes" AKA "Lineman's pliers".
Potato, pah-tato, let's call the whole thing off.
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wrote:

I think he meant dikes. The slip of "dykes" is a perfect leadin that anyone who can handle a vibrator with a kick starter ought to be able to cut wire.
FACE
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replying to sleepdog, Tom wrote: You will get carpal tunnel , trust me..forget the snips.
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That's what I'd use.
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Guy Scharf wrote:

Why not listen to the guy who sells the material? He's got by far the best choice listed. You don't say just what gage these panels are--there are many different ones. If it's what we call "hog panels" the bolt cutter is really the only practical way. If they're lighter, a pair of fencing pliers w/ the notch wire cutters work well and are more nimble.
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Knipex Compact Bolt-cutters. They're the size of regular wire-cutters, but double action like 3' bolt cutters (aka, "keys") http://www.knipex.de/index.php?idx3&L=1&grpID &ukat=schneid10
Fence pliers good if you've got the hand-strength to work them, because you can bend and twist with them too, but I've never seen any with the compound hinge that makes the Knipex so much fun to cut with.
--Goedjn
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wrote:

A cut off grinder will work. I have worn out about ten cut off grinders in my lifetime. They are, without a doubt, the nastiest, dirtiest, most dangerous way of cutting things that I can think of. If you use them properly, they will do the job. BUT, if you have a lot to cut, and you want to do it easily, safely, and quickly, GET SOME BOLT CUTTERS. Crimineltly, you can get a cheap pair for $20 today.
Why in the world even mess with a grinder even if you have one?
Steve
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Yeah, you'd probably use a chainsaw to cut brush, too. which is a bad idea for many of the same reasons.
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Not if you have the proper attachment. There is a guy here in SW Idaho who came up with a "brush cutting" attachment. It basically looks like the stationary bar on a sickle bar cutter or a hedge trimmer. It bolts to the side of the bar. As you know, when cutting brush the tendency is for the chain to just pull the limbs towards the saw w/o cutting them, possibly jamming and/or derailing the chain. This attachment's fingers "catches" the limbs/brush and hold them so the chain can do it's thing. They showed a video of it, worked about as good a regular hedge trimmer.
DJ
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