How to cut chair rail moulding in corners

Hi,
I am installing chair rail moulding in my house, and would like to ask you to share your experience in how you cut moulding in inside corners. Web sites says that you have to cut one peace 90 degree angle and moulding from another wall should be cut so in matches profile of another moulding. Example (step 6): http://www.easy2.com/cm/easy/diy_ht_index.asp?page_id5694127 But my moulding is very thick and to cut profile into another moulding is very very hard job. What are disadvantages if I'll cut 45 degree angle on bouth joint peaces?
Thanks for your info.
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Saw wrote:

WHEN not if, but WHEN the miter opens up a little bit, it will be less visible using a coped joint. A miter joint gives the eye a straight-on view of the wall through the gap.
A coped cut isn't too difficult...
1. Install one piece cut at 90deg to fit the wall. 2. The adjoining piece is cut at 45deg as if you were doing miter. 3. Draw a pencil line on the front edge of the miter cut 4. Using a coping saw cut away the excess to fit the first piece 5. Then and only then, cut the other end to fit flush to the opposite wall
Starting in a corner can be a bear if you have to make two coped cuts on the same piece of wood, so I usually start at a door frame and work from there.
The larger the molding the more difference the coped cut makes...
Brad
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Brad,
Thank you very much for your answer. If I understood correctly, it is important first to cut adjoining peace at 45 deg angle before doing coping. If I'll make 45 deg angle cut, then coping should be easier, but will that leave gap at the back of the moulding in place of joint?
Thanks,

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Saw wrote:

Try one. You will find that it works like magic. It is not all that difficult and that part you think is going to cause a void is totally hidden.

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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You misunderstood, you install one piece clear up to corner with 90 degree cut. To cope the other piece, you first cut it off at 45 degrees, as Brad said. Reread his post. You don't cut both adjoining pieces at 45 degrees.

another
angle
wall
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First, it depends on where in Canada you live. The moisture content of the air doesn't vary that much in the prairies, varies a great deal in the east.
Coping a corner (as you describe above) is preferable where moisture levels vary because wood swells and contracts, and mitred corners can open, leaving an ugly gap.
In the prairies, this is less a factor.
If you are going to mitre the corners, don't cut them at 45 degrees. Get an angle finder with at least 12" arms and use that to find the angle of the corner. Divide by two and make a trial cut with pieces of scrap. If you get a great fit, make your cut.
Remember, too, that walls are not smooth and straight; the thicker the material you use, the more noticeable those gapes will be.
For mitre cuts and thick material, I'd recommend you use paint grade moulding ... filling and painting will hide the imperfections.
If you are going stain grade, perhaps select a thinner material and cope it. Fill gaps along the wall with clear silicone.
Ken
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I live by " putty and paint make a carpenter look great!" and in my case, I certainly aint great
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Thank you everyone for info. I'll work on this tonight. Bambam - you said to fill up gaps along the wall with clear silicone. I was planning to paint moulding before attaching it to the wall and then fill gaps with white caulking. Will that work?
Thanks
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Whatever you do. do not use silicone. Paint will not stick to silicone. Use painter's latex caulk.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net
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Saw wrote:

Any caulk will work but if you use silicone make sure it is *paintable* silicone...regular isn't.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.05... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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Use a cope (it looks more difficult to do than in reality). If you just use 45 degrees, the joint will eventually separate and won't look too good. If you don't have any experience coping, buy a couple feet of molding and practice.
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Thank you everyone for your help.Last night I started to put chairrail and I followed steps you recommended and it looks good!
Thanks
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