How to cut bricks?

I am covering a patio with bricks, laid in sand. In order to cut starter bricks and to follow a curve, I need to cut about 20 bricks along the short dimension (4"). These are "split pavers", 1 1/4" thick.
I have a 7" circular saw. Can I use this saw to cut brick and what kind of blade should I use?
Thanks
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Walter
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I think there is a saw for this, but the way I've done it is with a brick chisel. Wide blade. Cut a grove, and then break at the grove, like you do when cutting glass tubing. If you screw up, bricks are cheap enough.
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Walter R. wrote:

I just did a similar (but smaller project, I only had to cut about 10)
I used a segmented dry diamond blade (because I have had it for ~ 20 years) in my Milwaukee worm drive.
It was dusty & dirty ....plus it left my saw pretty dirty as well.
I could have used a helper w/ a vac or set up a hose with duct tape but I only had about 10 to do.
If you've got a "beater" saw so not to use your "nice" one it would be better. I non-segmented blade is less likely to chip out the edge of the cut......but it is patio brick not kitchen tiles.
I don't remember if I cut from both sides (it's only a 6" blade) or I just cheated & tapped the brick to break in along the cut.
A diamond blade will make short work of these bricks......my HD has a pretty good selection (wide price range) of diamond blades.
Alternatively you could rent a wet saw.....no dust, just wet messy :)
be prepared to handle brick colored water, that they tend to spray about.
cheers Bob
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I'm in the process of installing brick walks right now, around 2700 bricks worth. I just finished a kiva style fireplace made from pumice brick and fire brick. I bit the bullet and bought a Harbor Freight wet saw for around $190. It has performed brilliantly and saved me a lot of headaches so I think I've gotten my money's worth. That being said, for only 20 bricks, I wouldn't buy it. For 3500, it was a no brainer. You can get dry blades for your circular saw that will work just fine. A wide chisel and hammer will work as well for simple cuts. Just beware, brick will create a lot of dust being cut dry so anticipate cleaning your saw thoroughly afterwards. As well, they contain silica dust when cut dry so you really should wear a mask. Cheers, cc
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On Tue, 11 Jul 2006 18:47:22 GMT, with neither quill nor qualm,

Try these chisels for just a couple dozen bricks. They're cheap and work well. http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?ItemnumberC669
Wet saws will get you along more quickly if you have 1,000 bricks to shape, but they start at $200.
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Walter R. wrote:

Dry Wet Concrete and Masonry Saw blade in my Black and Decker Hand Rotary saw. I cut about forty paving stones square and at angles for the driveway, lots of dust until I sprinkled a little water on the work before cutting. I made a wooden holder a bit like a mitre box to hold the stone and clamped it in a Workmate.
I was surprised at how easy it was apart from the noise and stone dust.
Good Luck
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Walter R. wrote:

Yes _____________
For your quantity, go to a hardware store and buy a masonry blade for a dollar or two. They are a bonded abrasive disc about 1/8" thick - sort of like a thin grinding wheel. Cut outside, they throw lots of dust.
Be sure the one you get is for masonry, similar ones are available for metal cutting.
--

dadiOH
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Buy two or even three. They wear out that fast.
You need some sort of backstop. Even a 1x2 screwed flat onto a chunk of plywood will do.
The dust is hell on the circular saw's bearings. Don't do this with an expensive wormdrive. A spraybottle with some water would probably help. My cheap skilsaw has significant slop in its bearings now.
The scraping of the saw shoe on brick will make you cringe.
A dust mask is critical.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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