How to cure dead spots in lawn

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No matter how much I water I still have dead spots in my lawn. I don't have many weeds and no pine trees. But I can't seem to make nice grass grow in these spots. Any suggestions?
--
Dave-Morris

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On Apr 13, 3:34 pm, Dave-Morris <Dave-Morris.

I will give you the advice my wife gives me every time I say anything about problems with the grass.
ASTROTURF!
Seriously, if the grass is dying over the same spots in your yard and repeated efforts to resod are not working, you need to rework the soil in those areas. There is something in the dirt that is killing the grass and the only solution is to remove the soil and replace it. In all probability, the builders dumped some chemicals, paint, or lye in that area and it is causing the grass to die.
If that doesn't work...ASTROTURF.
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Oh, phooey. You can't say that without knowing a lot more about the area and the problems it faces. There are numerous other things that can prevent grass from growing in a particular area: deep shade, rocky soil, heavy clay soil, poor/no drainage... It's irresponsible, not to mention absurd, to immediately leap to the conclusion that the cause *must* be dumping of toxic waste.
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On Apr 13, 7:05 pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Agree. I also get concerned when someone says that no matter how much they water, the grass won't grow. Overwatering and doing it wrong can also lead to fungus and disease which kills grass.
With almost nothing to go on, the list of what could be wrong is long.
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On Mon, 13 Apr 2009 17:14:30 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I've got one spot that drains poorly and doesn't grow good roots. Dies off every summer. One of these years I'll dig it up and spring for one of those BIG bags of topsoil.
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Think of the federal funding for cleanup. Do it for the children, man! And the money doesn't hurt.
--
Christopher A. Young
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Yeah, like welfare for polygamists.
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On Apr 13, 6:05 pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Gee Doug, don't get your panties in a wad. I said in all probability and that is true rather you like it or not. Most builders use the yard to dump construction waste and anyone who has ever observed a neighborhood under construction knows this. Yes, there are other causes but the solution in most cases will be to dig out the area and either replace or amend the soil.
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No, it is not true that "in all probability the builders dumped some chemicals, paint, or lye in that area."

Construction debris, yes. "Chemicals, paint, or lye", no. What "chemicals" are used on-site in building a house? What does a housebuilder use lye for? Dumping paint, maybe -- but latex paint won't prevent grass from growing, and what builder uses oil-base paint now?
You simply don't have a clue what you're talking about.

Without seeing it, and with as little information as the OP provided, you can't possibly say with any degree of certainty what is preventing grass from growing in that spot. There may be a concrete slab there, for all you know, with only half an inch of soil on top of it. Or perhaps that's where the excavation contractor dumped a bunch of clay from digging the foundation. There are a hundred possible causes, and it's simply not true that "in all probability" it's due to dumping of toxic chemicals.
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On Apr 14, 10:04 am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Deny all you want but you simply are in denial and need to do some on site observation.

And you are in total denial of common practice.

Please learn to READ and COMPREHEND. I didn't say with certainty but did say probability and the probability remains that whatever is killing the grass is probably the result of construction dumping. That may be chemicals, buried construction materials, dumped concrete, or any number of other things. As for lye being used, lye is a component of cement which is often washed down from the trucks delivering concrete to a constuction site.
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I used to work construction. I've seen what happens.

No, you simply don't have a clue. Lye?? Come on, don't be ridiculous. What is a home builder doing with lye?

*You* need to learn to read and comprehend. I know perfectly well you said "probability" -- I even quoted it.

That's simply false.
It's *possibly* the result of construction dumping. It's also possibly the result of poor drainage, or a hidden concrete slab an inch under the surface, or deep shade, or clay left over from the foundation excavation, or a dozen other things -- and without investigating it on-site, it's not possible to say that it's "probably" any one of those things.

No, it is not. Lye is NaOH; portland cement is CaO.
Like I said -- you don't have a clue what you're talking about.
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On Apr 14, 10:27 pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Then why are you lying about it?

And YOU either are lying about being in construction or have turned your back on all of the dumping that is common by the construction crews. I have see lye used by construcion crews preparing for concrete pours. Lye is also used in some concrete and is leached out when concrete trucks was out there trucks after dumping their loads. Was down a few trucks in the same spot and you won't get much to grow in that spot. The list of dumped materials goe on and on.

In your opinion and only in your opinion.

Yes, I know about all those HIDDEN SLABS an inch under the surface. They are everywhere!

You might check again, lye is most definately used in concrete and if you were in construction as you claim, you would know that.
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Lye and Portland cement are not the same thing.

Oh, I agree -- what I'm objecting to is you leaping to the totally unwarranted conclusion that that's the most likely explanation for a random dead spot in the lawn. There are many, many other explanations, most of them at least equally likely.
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On Apr 15, 7:50 am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Geez, with so little info given, it could be anything that's causing this guys "dead spots". Could be grubs, other insects, or disease for all we know. I agree with Doug, you're wildly jumping to conclusions that it's probably construction debris related. I don't know what goes on where anyone else lives, but here in NJ builders can't use the construction site as a dump. If they do, they can expect a fine and visit from the DEP.
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On Apr 15, 6:50 am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I never said it was. There are a number of different mixtures used in concrete and lye is a part of most of those mixtures. The only one to mention Protland cement was you.

Well, you leap to your conclusions and I will leap to mine. Mine were based on observation. When I had my house built 30+ years ago it was one if the first in the neighborhood. Since I worked out of my home at the time I had the chance to watch most of the homes in the neighborhood being built. Not only were bags of lye used for the preparation of my homes foundation, I watched it being used on most of the homes around me. (At least those constructed by the better builders.) They mixed it with the foundation sand and dirt before laying down a plastic liner. I am not sure of the reason for its use but it was used. I also watched as the concrete trucks constantly washed out their trucks after unloading and they always seemed to dump in the same spots and the wash it it. In addition, I watched the construction crews dump all sorts of crap on site from paints to motor oil and bury a lot of construction materials.
Over the following years it was interesting to see the various problems my neighbors had with their yards. Since most of them tried to grow turf lawns it was easy to know what was causing them the most grief. I had a couple of areas that were early problems as well until I gave up on trying to grow grass in heavy shade and dug out the soil to built up the yard for landscaping. The subdivision was cut from a dense forest and most of the builders had opted to remove almost all of the trees. Since I got in early and picked my lot, I retained almost all of my trees. Gave me a totally different set of problems from most of my neighbors.
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Ahhh, now I understand why you think they use lye in concrete. They don't. You're thinking of *lime*. It's NOT the same.
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On Apr 15, 10:15 am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Then they shouldn't have labeled the bags as LYE.
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ROTFL! You just can't bring yourself to admit that you made a mistake, can you? *Lime* is a common additive in concrete, mortar, and plaster. *Lye* is not. There is a difference.
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On Apr 15, 11:24 am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Because I didn't make a mistake. I know the difference between the two and what was being used was LYE! Now get up off the floor and pull your head out of your ass.
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Whatever. It's clear you haven't the faintest idea what you're talking about, but that's ok. Go on thinking that they put lye in the concrete. Put it in your own concrete if you like, I don't care.
Just don't ever try to mix mortar for anyone else, OK?
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