How to Choose, Buy, and Safely Use a Good Surge Protector

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Most of us have more devices than we have plugs in the wall, which is why you'll likely find a surge protector behind most people's televisions and under our desks. However, not all surge protectors are alike, and some even put your gadgets at risk. We talked to an electrician to sort out how to tell the good ones from the bad ones, and how to use them safely.
Charles Ravenscraft (yes, that's Lifehacker writer Eric Ravenscraft's brother) is a licensed union electrician, and sat down with me to talk about how to choose the best surge protectors for your gadgets, and how to avoid accidents, electrical fires, and other dangerous situations when using them. Here's what you need to know.
Understand the Difference Between a Power Strip and a Surge Protector
How to Choose, Buy, and Safely Use a Good Surge Protector
First of all, not every power strip is a surge protector. It may sound basic, but it's a fundamental piece of knowledge you'll need. While a power strip just splits your outlet into multiple ports, a surge protector is designed to protect your computer, TV, and other electronics against power surges and any interference or noise on your power line. Power surges may not be an everyday event, but they're common enough that they can damage your equipment. Charles notes:
The main thing for people to pay attention too is that they are in fact buying a "surge protector" and not a power strip. A consumer should look for the words surge protection, fused strip, or interrupter switch. If it says power strip on it it most likely does not offer surge protection, so pay attention.
You'll almost certainly pay more for a surge protector than a power strip, but it's worth it. If you're the type to head over to Amazon and just buy whatever's cheapest, keep this in mind. Don't assume that because it's in the same category as surge protectors, or even in the department store hanging next to the surge protectors that it is one. Choose the Right Surge Protector for Your Needs
How to Choose, Buy, and Safely Use a Good Surge Protector
There are five major points to consider when buying a surge protector. They are:
Buy the right number of ports. Don't just assume that every surge protector is six or eight ports. Some of them, like one of my favorites, sport 12 ports, well spaced so you can use them all. Buying the right number of ports will make sure you don't have to daisy chain surge protectors—something we'll get to in a moment. Consider the gear you'll plug into the surge protector. Think about the things you're going to plug into the surge protector you're buying. You can just go all out and buy the best you can afford, but you'll save some money by buying a surge protector appropriate for the equipment you'll use it with. Your TV and home entertainment center will call for a more robust surge protector than the lamp and phone charger on your nightstand, for example. Check for the UL seal, and make sure it's a "transient voltage surge suppressor." Making sure that the surge protector you're planning to buy is both certified by Underwriter's Laboratories, and at least meets their UL 1449 standards (required for the label "transient voltage surge suppressor,") will make sure the surge protector you take home will actually protect the equipment you plug into it. Check the surge protector's energy absorption rating, and its "clamping voltage." The absorption rating is, as the name implies, how much energy it can absorb before it fails. You'll want something at least 6-700 joules or higher. (Higher is better here.) The clamping voltage is the voltage that will trigger the surge protector—or essentially when the surge protector wakes up and starts absorbing energy. Look for something around 400 V or less. Lower is better here. Finally, see if response time is listed in the product details—it's good to know, and lower is better. Check the warranty. Some surge protectors warranty the devices connected to it for some amount of damages if a power surge does get through. Check to see what's covered (and what isn't), and how you can file a warranty claim if the surge protector fails.
Belkin Pivot-Plug Surge Protector
Amazon.com: $24.84
Bottom line: Make sure you're informed before you buy, and read the back of the box or the product details before you buy anything. You don't want to invest in a surge protector only to find out that it's far too weak to protect your devices, or it's a surge protector in name only. Charles notes that price shouldn't guide your decision, either:
As far as cost, the most expensive is not always the best. The best thing to do is figure out what you need to protect and buy accordingly.
Related Conserve Surge Protector Saves Energy, Money
Belkin's Conserve Surge Protector with timer knocks out the energy drain from vampire devices that draw standby power even when they're… Read…
You might also want to look into other features, like a surge protector that automatically turn off when your devices turn off or stop charging, or has a remote control that you can use to turn it on or off along with the devices on them. The idea is especially good for surge protectors connected to things that like to live in standby mode, like game consoles and some TVs, and the remote control options are great for surge protectors that are hard to get to. Don't Daisy Chain Multiple Surge Protectors
How to Choose, Buy, and Safely Use a Good Surge Protector
Odds are you've daisy chained, or plugged a power strip into another power strip or surge protector, when you were desperate for more outlets. It's tempting, and it's easy, but it's also dangerous. Charles explains:
As far as daisy chaining surge protectors, it doesn't work. The first strip will trip if a second is plugged into it and used. In theory power strips can be daisy chained since they lack surge protection, however I would severely advise against it.
Remember in "A Christmas Story," when they had all those cords plugged in at once and it blew a fuse? Yeah, it's kind of like that except that overloading the circuit can create the source of ignition for an electrical fire.
So resist the urge to daisy chain your power strips, or plug a bunch of power strips into a surge protector. It may be tempting, and you may look at it from a "eh, it can't hurt if I just do it once" perspective, but whenever you do it you're taking a risk that you need to be clear-headed about when you do it. Frankly, we think it's not worth it when you can buy a surge protector with more ports—or another surge protector you can put next to your existing one—for a couple of dollars.
For more reading, check out this Home Depot guide to surge protectors, which includes not just surge protector strips like we've discussed, but also whole-home surge protectors you can have installed and more details on UL certifications for surge protectors. Similarly, this guide from Tripplite will help you pick a good surge protector for your needs (although remember Tripplite sells them, so they have a vested interest). A little forethought, research, and safe practices will go a long way towards making sure your gadgets are safe from harm—and that you're not fumbling around behind your gear looking for spare outlets.
Charles Ravenscraft is a certified union electrician. He graciously volunteered his expertise for this post, and we thank him.
Photos by Daniel R.Blume, Al Pavangkanan, Joy Mystic, and State Farm.
http://lifehacker.com/your-homes-electrical-circuits-probably-need-to-be-grou-1409892102
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On 9/27/2013 3:51 PM, Metspitzer wrote:

I'd like to hear more about the mechanism that makes this happen...
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On 9/27/2013 4:51 PM, Metspitzer wrote:

I haven't figured out how noise filters actually do anything useful.

A multiport protector is likely to refer to connections where coax and phone can wire through the protector.
You should get a protector with enough outlet for what you want to plug-in, and space around the outlet is need if you are plugging in wall warts.

People use surge protectors for lamps? I wouldn't use one for a phone charger either unless it was real easy to use a protector that was around for more important equipment. And if a load merits a surge protector why would some of them require significantly less protection?

Actually UL "lists" equipment. It doesn't "certify".

330V is the lowest that is in the UL1449 listing standard. And lower is not necessarily better.

Virtually all plug-in protectors use MOVs. MOVs are fast enough for any surge. Response time is meaningless.

Better be a major brand if you expect to use a warranty.
I would only buy a protector with a major brand name anyway.

No idea what this is about.

"In name only"?
If UL1449 listed at least a protector provides enough protection to survive the surges included in the UL testing.

I can't think of many places where some of these fancy expensive features would be useful.
The protector for my computer and related stuff is accessible and I turn it off.
If I turn the protector for my big TV and related stuff off, various stuff loses programing.

Actually I agree with this.

I agree with mike and trader that this is idiocy.

It is actually a violation of UL listing to daisy chain power strips, including surge protectors.

I suspect that is why UL doesn't want power strips daisy chained, but with minimal intelligence overloading can be avoided.

Totally missing, as trader noted, and of major importance: All interconnected equipment must be plugged into the same protector. All external connections, including phone and cable, _must_ go through the protector.
Any competent manufacturer will tell you the same thing. If you don't observe that restriction you may well be better off not using a surge protector.

Electricians, union or otherwise, are not necessarily experts on surge protection.
This one missed one of the most important points - all external connections must go through the protector. The electrician on This Old House, in a recent thread, missed the same thing.

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wrote:

Why would an electrician be any kind of expert on surge protection? Maybe he is, maybe he's full of crap.
My vote is for crap, not just for him but for the whole bloody nonsense about surge protectors. It's a giant industry to protect you from something that basically none of you have to worry about.
There was a guy in my computer club many years ago who worked for one of the main companies that built surge protectors. He said it's all nonsense as far as anyone really needing them. The transient spikes are damped out in just a few feet of house wiring, I think he said 6 feet. So unless you have really crappy wiring in your house with bad grounds and such and the outlet your computer is plugged into is the same outlet as your 40 year old refrigerator uses that draws 20 amps to start and dims the lights then repeats 6 times before finally starting, you are chasing a mirage. About the only thing you might need to worry about is lightening striking but if it does your little surge strip isn't going to protect anything anyway.
I've been buying the cheapest power strips I can find for 30 years and have never had a problem with a power "surge" and I leave my system on 24/7. I did have lightening strike once and it blew the shit out of a radio and computer and clock, fried a couple breakers, etc. No surge protector would have stopped that motha.
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wrote:

I'd think that some may know, others not. It is not something you study in "How to Wire a Receptacle" but like any trade, some study deeper.

Then I need one for my computer. It is less than 3 feet from the main coming into the house and the panel. Actually, I use a battery backup that also protects me from little glitches too.

Had one of those too. Nothing happened to my computer, but I did have to scrap my TV and buy a 47" flat screen. Also had to pick up pieces of the blown apart receptacle where it came into the detached garage and then into the house. Lost the TV, Receiver, doorbell, circuit breaker.
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On 9/28/2013 11:12 PM, Ashton Crusher wrote:

You are talking about surges that originate inside the house. I agree they are not a problem. The 2 sources I often post, from the IEEE and NIST, do not include surges originating inside the house as a problem. I don't remember that competent manufacturers talk about surges originating inside a house.
Lightning, however, can be a problem. So can a number of normal and abnormal power utility events.
As I have often written, a plug-in protector with good ratings and connected correctly is very likely to protect from a very near very strong lightning strike.
A protector at the service panel is very likely to protect anything connected only to power wiring from a very near very strong lightning strike.
The IEEE and NIST surge guides are to give you information to protect from lightning strikes.

In your opinion.
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Absolutely IMHO. The surges from outside the house are even less of a problem because typically you've got dozens of feet of wire between where your service entrance is and where the wire to it connects to "the mains". And people in areas where the "grid" is buried underground have even less need to worry about "surges".
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On 9/29/2013 8:28 PM, Ashton Crusher wrote:

Lightning strikes are basically current sources. Strong surges can cause arc-over at a service panel - about 6,000V. "Dozens of feet of wire" give no protection.
What "dozens of feet" may refer to is that a relatively short length of wire will significantly lower the "rise time" of a very fast surge, which could affect the "response time" for a protector. But MOVs are fast enough for surges.
Perhaps you could read the NIST surge guide. You might learn something.
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On Sunday, September 29, 2013 1:12:47 AM UTC-4, Ashton Crusher wrote:

The computer club guy was discussing protectors that do not claim to prot ect from destructive surges. Plugin types that costs dollars to make while selling for tens or 100 dollars. He is right about best protection damped out in the first six feet. But only if a completely different device (also misleadingly called a surge protector) exists there.
One incoming wire already connects to earth. So a destructive surge is d amped out in the first feet. Other AC wires are only earthed if a 'whole h ouse' protector makes that low impedance (ie 'less than 10 foot') connectio n to single point ground. Only then are surges made completely irrelevant in the first feet. If that completely different device ('whole house' prot ector) does not exist, then surges are inside hunting for earth destructive ly via appliances.
Destructive surges occur maybe once every seven years. In your case, app arently once in thirty years. Those cheap power strips did exactly what th ey claim - no protection from destructive surges. Why do so many recommend replacing power strip protectors every couple years? Because advertising says so. Most who recommend plug-in protectors are educated by advertising . And not by hard facts.
Daily surges that so many fear are only noise - made completely irrelevan t by protection already inside every appliance - even dimmer switches. Eff ective protection means destructive surges (even direct lightning strikes) are damped out when connection low impedance (ie 'less than 10 feet') to ea rth.
Routine is protection from direct lightning strikes when a protector conn ects low impedance to earth. And the numbers that say so. Direct lightnin g strikes are typically about 20,000 amps. So a minimal 'whole house' prot ector is 50,000 amps. Because unlike power strips, one 'whole house' prote ctor is protection for all types of surges including direct lightning strik es.
"No surge protector would have stopped that motha". Correct. Any protec tor that stops, blocks, or absorbs a surge is a scam. Why is a 'whole hous e' protector so effective? It works like a wire. It connects hundreds of thousands of joules harmlessly to earth outside the building. Then even pow er strip protectors (that only claim to absorb hundreds of joules) are prot ected.
Another probably has posted the usual cut and paste myths. With text to keep you confused. Page 33 (Adobe page 42) figure 8 shows how plug-in prot ectors even earth a surge 8000 volts destructively via any nearby appliance . Nothing protects once a destructive surge is all but invited inside. So mehow adjacent protectors must somehow block or absorb a surge. Nothing st ops or blocks destructive surges. Therefore every facility that cannot hav e damage always connects destructive surges to earth outside the building - either by a wire or via a 'whole house' protector. Only then is one surge every seven years or one surge every 30 years made irrelevant. That super ior solution (because is does not stop surges) also costs tens or 100 times less money.
Protection is always about where hundreds of thousands of joules dissipat e. Either harmlessly in earth (damped out in the first six feet). Or dest ructively via appliances. Surge damage is determined by decisions made by a homeowner. A protector is only as effective as its earth ground - since nothing an stop a surge.
Why do companies with better integrity manufacturer 'whole house' protect ors? Do you want protection. Or do you want to enrich them for selling a $3 power strip with ten cent protector parts for $25 or $80? Better is to put your money into real world protection. That means a 'whole house' prot ector (a completely different device) from companies such as Leviton, Sysco m, Siemens, Polyphaser, Intermatic, ABB, General Electric, Square D, or Cut ler-Hammer - to name but a few. An effective Cutler-Hammer solution was se lling in Lowes and Home Depot for less than $50. Then grossly undersized p ower strip protectors need not create house fires.
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wrote:

I *knew* this bait was just too tempting for W_Tom to refuse. The idiot can't even figure out how to use a newsreader.
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Nah, W_Tom's surges are caused by broken mirrors.
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wrote:

Excellent info.
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On 9/29/2013 9:14 AM, westom wrote:

What a surprise. The village idiot is here with his misrepresentations, and lies.
But no answers to simple questions - like: - Why do the only 2 examples of protection in the IEEE guide use plug-in protectors? - Why does the NIST guide says plug-in protectors are "the easiest solution"? - Why does the NIST guide say "One effective solution is to have the consumer install" a multiport plug-in protector? - How would a service panel protector provide any protection in the IEEE example, page 33? - Why does the IEEE guide say for distant service points "the only effective way of protecting the equipment is to use a multiport [plug-in] protector"? - Why did Martzloff say in his paper "One solution. illustrated in this paper, is the insertion of a properly designed [multiport plug-in surge protector]"? - Why aren't airplanes crashing daily when they get hit by lightning (or do they drag an earthing chain)?
Still missing - anyone who agrees with westom that plug-in protectors do not work.
For real science read the IEEE surge guide (posted by trader) and the NIST surge guide: And also: http://www.eeel.nist.gov/817/pubs/spd-anthology/file/Surges%20happen!.pdf Both surge guides say plug-in protectors are effective.
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On Monday, September 30, 2013 8:49:54 AM UTC-4, bud-- wrote:

And finally, after all these years and all those posts Tom's actually found someone, Ashton, who agrees with him.

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On Sunday, September 29, 2013 11:14:11 AM UTC-4, westom wrote:

otect from destructive surges.
The first lie. How do you know what some guy at a computer club was or wasn't talking about? Were you there?

lars.
Imagine that. By the time a product goes from manufacturing to being bought in a store, there is considerable markup along the way.
He is right about best protection damped out in the first six feet. But o nly if a completely different device (also misleadingly called a surge prot ector) exists there.

Good grief. There was no mention of ANY surge protector. The "computer club guy", we are told, said just 6 ft of wire is all that's needed period.

damped out in the first feet. Other AC wires are only earthed if a 'whole house' protector makes that low impedance (ie 'less than 10 foot') connect ion to single point ground. Only then are surges made completely irrelevan t in the first feet.
The IEEE guide disagrees. They clearly show the need for multi-port surge protectors to protect appliances connected to more than just the AC, eg a TV or PC connected to cable, phone, Ethernet, etc.
> If that completely different device ('whole house' protector) does not e xist, then surges are inside hunting for earth destructively via appliances .

pparently once in thirty years. Those cheap power strips did exactly what they claim - no protection from destructive surges.
If it's just a power strip with no surge protection, then it's true that it has no surge protection. It doesn't claim to have surge protection either.
Why do so many recommend replacing power strip protectors every couple yea rs? Because advertising says so. Most who recommend plug-in protectors ar e educated by advertising. And not by hard facts.

Now you've conflated power strip type SURGE PROTECTORS, ie power strips that are rated for surge protection with the above ones that are not surge protectors and don't claim to be.

ant by protection already inside every appliance - even dimmer switches.
I don't know what "many fear" or think about surges. I've always been primarily concerned about surges originating on the utility lines.

kes) are damped out when connection low impedance (ie 'less than 10 feet') to earth.

Still waiting all these years for an answer as to if no protection is possible without a 10 ft low impedance connection to earth, how are avionics protected in aircraft?

nnects low impedance to earth. And the numbers that say so. Direct lightn ing strikes are typically about 20,000 amps. So a minimal 'whole house' pr otector is 50,000 amps. Because unlike power strips, one 'whole house' pro tector is protection for all types of surges including direct lightning str ikes.

Of course as has been pointed out by Bud a zillion times now, the chance of that 20,000 amps making it to a surge protector is very small. That much energy arcs over and most of the energy in a lightning strike gets dissipated before it even gets to the surge protector.

ector that stops, blocks, or absorbs a surge is a scam.
Strawman detected. Strawman rejected. Perhaps you'd like to show us a surge protector from a major manufacturer that says their product "absorbs" a surge.
Why is a 'whole house' protector so effective? It works like a wire. It connects hundreds of thousands of joules harmlessly to earth outside the bu ilding. Then even power strip protectors (that only claim to absorb hundred s of joules) are protected.

Why are avionics on airplanes protected without a direct wire to earth?

o keep you confused. Page 33 (Adobe page 42) figure 8 shows how plug-in pr otectors even earth a surge 8000 volts destructively via any nearby applian ce. Nothing protects once a destructive surge is all but invited inside. Somehow adjacent protectors must somehow block or absorb a surge. Nothing stops or blocks destructive surges.
It's unbelievable that you have the balls to actually keep bringing this up and trying to use it to lie. Does the IEEE say what you claim, that the surge protector on TV1 "caused" the damage on TV2? No. They show the surge protector on TV1 working, TV1 having no damage. TV2 without a surge protector they show being damaged. And then they clearly state:
"A second multi-port protector as shown in Fig. 7 is required to protect TV 2" That statement is the last line of the paragraph that's part of fig 8.
That is 180 deg opposite of what you claim. Also, on the page before, they show another example of a plug-in surge protector being used to protect a TV from a destructive surge. Everyone can see it for themselves:
pages 32 and 33,
http://www.lightningsafety.com/nlsi_lhm/IEEE_Guide.pdf
Two examples of plug-in protectors being used, right in the IEEE guide. Now, who should we believe? The IEEE expert engineers, or you? Where are YOUR references?
Therefore every facility that cannot have damage always connects destructi ve surges to earth outside the building - either by a wire or via a 'whole house' protector. Only then is one surge every seven years or one surge ev ery 30 years made irrelevant. That superior solution (because is does not stop surges) also costs tens or 100 times less money.

And all those "facilities", eg telcos, also use a tiered strategy, just like the IEEE recommends. They don't rely on just a surge protector on the lines where they enter the building. Telephone line cards for example, have surge protection on them too.

ate.
If that's all that's required, then the lightning strike at the utility line 200 ft from the house won't cause any problems inside the house, right? Because that's where the hundreds of thousands of joules is dissipated, ie where the lightning strike was. Only a small fraction of that energy makes it to the house, to the appliance, etc.
Either harmlessly in earth (damped out in the first six feet). Or destruct ively via appliances. Surge damage is determined by decisions made by a ho meowner. A protector is only as effective as its earth ground - since noth ing an stop a surge.

Are those airplanes connected with a 6 ft wire to earth?

ctors?
The problem here is your faulty definition of "better integrity". You claim any company that makes plug-in surge protectors is a scam. Yet there are companies like GE making them. And I believe Bud has shown you examples where companies that make whole house types also talk about using plug-ins too. Just like IEEE.
Do you want protection. Or do you want to enrich them for selling a $3 po wer strip with ten cent protector parts for $25 or $80? Better is to put y our money into real world protection. That means a 'whole house' protector (a completely different device) from companies such as Leviton, Syscom, Si emens, Polyphaser, Intermatic, ABB, General Electric, Square D, or Cutler-H ammer - to name but a few. An effective Cutler-Hammer solution was selling in Lowes and Home Depot for less than $50. Then grossly undersized power strip protectors need not create house fires.
Better take GE off that list. They sell plug-ins. Also another question asked and never answered all these years. Where is the link to that surge protector at HD that is rated at 50K amps for $50?
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On Sunday, September 29, 2013 1:12:47 AM UTC-4, Ashton Crusher wrote:

What makes you think this person knows anything more than the electrician you just criticized. Was he an electrical engineer, familiar with surge protection concepts, or did he work the company phone?

BS. Relevant documents from NIST, IEEE have been posted here many times and they sure don't say anything like that. Maybe you can explain to us the physics behind how 6 ft of house wiring stops a surge.
So unless you have really crappy wiring in your house with bad

Refrigerators and similar appliances in the house typically don't create the surges that need to be protected against.
About the only thing you might

Well that's true if the lightning bolt directly hits the TV sitting in the living room. But that is almost impossible. The surges from lightning that damage appliances in a house are typically from lighting striking nearby, eg hitting the utility lines along the street, the service cable going to the house, etc. That creates a powerful surge, on the lines going into the house, but it's a small amount of the total energy from the lightning strike. Surge protectors are effective in dealing with those surges. If they are not, why do you think companies that have electronic eqpt to protect, eg Telco, cable company, etc all use surge protection?

Good grief. Read the IEEE guide. If you had decent surge protectorion, all that damage could have likely been prevented.
Read what the IEEE panel of engineering professionals says:
http://www.lightningsafety.com/nlsi_lhm/IEEE_Guide.pdf
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On Sun, 29 Sep 2013 09:48:38 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

That's lightening protection, not the "surge protection" the scammers are selling.
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On Sunday, September 29, 2013 10:32:46 PM UTC-4, Ashton Crusher wrote:

"Where do you think most destructive surges seen by appliances like a TV or PC come from? Did you bother to even read the IEEE guide?"
1. INTRODUCTION This guide is intended to provide useful information about the proper specification and application of surge protectors, to protect houses and their contents from lightning and other electrical surges. The guide is written for electricians, electronics technicians and engineers, electrical inspectors, building designers, and others with some technical background, and the need to understand lightning protection. Surge protection has become a much more complex and important issue in recent years."
Lightning is the most common sources of these destructive surges. As Bud pointed out there are other possible sources from utility events as well. You, in your post, basically dismissed the possibility of protecting against lightning surges.
"I did have lightening strike once and it blew the shit out of a radio and computer and clock, fried a couple breakers, etc. No surge protector would have stopped that motha. "
The IEEE guide discusses exactly that situation. They show how a lighting strike to the utility lines near a home creates a surge at the appliance and they show a tiered protection strategy that would have prevented the above damage that you had. That strategy includes the use of multi-port, plug-in surge protectors. Also note that nowhere does that IEEE guide written by several industry engineers who are experts in the field say that 6 feet of wire will stop the typical destructive surge, that plug-in surge protectors are useless, etc. Did 6 ft stop your surge? Good grief.
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On Sunday, September 29, 2013 12:48:38 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote :

The IEEE Guide shows that good protector too far from earth ground. Ther efore nearby appliances were damaged by 8000 volts. How can this be since you claim a surge can be inside the house and never cause damage. Oh. You are attacking the messenger because you have no facts.
Protection means a surge current is not inside the house. Any protector that would stop or absorb that current at the appliance is ... well where i s that manufacturer spec number that claims protection? Oh. You never pro vided one for one good reason. Even the manufacturer does not claim to prot ect from typically destructive surges. So you attack the messenger rather than post facts.
Even the IEEE Guide shows what happens when a surge is not properly earth ed by one 'whole house' protector. Appliances damaged by 8000 volts. Page 33 (Adobe page 42) figure 8.
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On Monday, September 30, 2013 9:44:59 AM UTC-4, westom wrote:

Nonsense it shows it by the TV and protecting the TV in fig 7. In fig 8, it clearly shows two TV's. One uses a plug-in multi-port surge protector and it's protected from the destructive surge. The other TV, TV2 without a plug-in protector in the same diagram is damaged by the surge. The IEEE guide then states:
"A second multi-port protector as shown in Fig. 7 is required to protect TV2"
They show two separate instances of how to protect appliances, the only two in fact, and both show the use of plug-in surge protectors.
Only a liar would turn that into:
"The IEEE Guide shows that good protector too far from earth ground."
Therefore nearby appliances were damaged by 8000 volts. How can this be since you claim a surge can be inside the house and never cause damage. Oh.
"A second multi-port protector as shown in Fig. 7 is required to protect TV2"

I have the IEEE guide. It's quite obvious you have no credible references at all that agree with your assertions. That's why you have to take the IEEE guide and totally misrepresent and lie about what it actually says. They show one TV protected from a surge by a plug-in. The second TV, with no plug-in protector, gets damaged. The IEEE guides states:
"A second multi-port protector as shown in Fig. 7 is required to protect TV2"
And you try to turn that into plug-in surge protectors being useless, can't work because they have no earth ground, cause damage, etc?
Good grief!

Again, 180deg opposite the IEEE guide.
Any protector that would stop or absorb that current at the appliance is ... well where is that manufacturer spec number that claims protection? Oh. You never provided one for one good reason.
Here's an example from APC:
https://www.apc.com/products/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?base_sku=P6BMP4
Output Number of Outlets
6
Receptacle Style
NEMA 5-15R
Input
Nominal Input Voltage
120V
Input Frequency
50/60 Hz +/- 5 Hz (auto sensing)
Input Connections
NEMA 5-15P NEMA 5-15P
Maximum Line Current per phase
15A
Cord Length
1.83 meters
Surge Protection and Filtering
Surge energy rating
490 Joules
eP Joule Rating
1080
EMI/RFI Noise rejection (100 kHz to 10 MHz)
20 dB
Peak Current Normal Mode
10 kAmps
Peak Current Common Mode
20 kAmps
Let Through Voltage Rating
< 330
Physical
Net Weight
0.45 KG
Maximum Height
292.00 mm
Maximum Width
57.00 mm
Maximum Depth
38.00 mm
Happy now?
Even the manufacturer does not claim to protect from typically destructive surges. So you attack the messenger rather than post facts.

Of course the manufacturer's claim that they protect from typical surges.

What the IEEE guide actually shows is a diagram with two TV's. TV1 is protected by a plug-in surge protector and has no damage. TV2 has no surge protector and is damaged. IEEE then states:
""A second multi-port protector as shown in Fig. 7 is required to protect TV2"
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