How to build metal stud non-load bearing wall?

Does any one know of a web site for a novice?
Thanks in advance.
Doug
ps. I live in a condo so my only choice is metal according to the board.
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doug wrote:

no help with how to, but WHY? I really don't like metal framing for a variety of reasons (weak, have to use BX for electric, did I mention weak? don't fall against it...)
nate
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Framing with LGS (light gage steel) is realitively easy. I've done some and got decent at it but a lot of the skills & tricks of stick framing don't translate.
I don't know of any websites but I'm sure that a search on Google will yield something.
Here are a couple things that might help
LGS studs come in various thicknesses ...... 20 gauge comes to mind for most residential apps
Steel studs & tracks can easily be cut with a metal cutting abrasive wheel on your 10" miter/chop saw...... sparks / abrasive dust might be hard on your saw...rig up a sacrificial guard to deflect them
Steel studs (either cut or from the factory can have some pretty nasty burrs, handle carefully & keep the band-aids handy.
Studs are attached to the floor & ceiling tracks using a modified truss head; self-drilling screw. Two screws through the tracks & stud flanges...both ends of studs
The heads of these framing screws create slight obstructions that prevent plywood or drywall from seating cleanly against the face of the studs at the floor & ceiling tracks....just a fcat of screwed together LGS framing.
Drywall can be affixed to the studs using a self-drilling drywall screw.
LGS framing isn't hugely stiff until attached to the floor & ceiling OR until diagonal strap bracing or sheathing is applied.
I'm not sure why Nate denigrates LGS framing....once it's properly braced and sheathed, its strength & stiff is comparable to stick framed walls with drywall.
I'm not a huge fan of LGS framing because my skill level with it sucks compared to wood but it has its place.
For a "one off" partition wall, if you've got any experience with an Erector Set or assembly of shelving requiring small screws & nuts ......you've got enough skill to muddle through
cheers Bob
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BobK207 wrote:

I run it down because I've been on lots of job sites that have been framed but not rocked - the stuff they are using can be cut with tin snips and is hardly thicker than flashing. If you look at it funny you'll bend it. You have to be real careful carrying materials, if you bump into a wall that hasn't been rocked yet you can take out the whole wall easy and then the framing guys will be pissed at you. Wood is just WAY better in my experience - none of these downsides *and* you can run cheaper Romex.
nate
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Why? Because his condo board said so. Does not have to make sense.
Some fire codes call for metal studs in certain locations. I'm not sure about the MC if you use the insulators that fit into the holes. I know metal sheathing is needed for commercial though.
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http://www.cfsei.org/details/PDF/Low-Rise%20Residential%20Construction%20Details.pdf
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Manual and details on the left
http://www.metalframing.org/
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On Thu, 27 Nov 2008 13:15:57 -0800, doug wrote:

I have used tin snips to cut the flange sides and use one of those aluminum framing squares that is about 6x6 and a razor knife to score the back of the 4" side. Bend and break to get square cuts. There are insulators to run wiring through. This is one I had from a prior project in my shed.
http://s370.photobucket.com/albums/oo141/rlm_photos/?action=view&current=s7001455.jpg
This is others that are available. http://www.buyhardwaresupplies.com/?t=5&m=g1&itemNumber203882
Google has plenty of sites. Nothing hard about it. google.com/search?q=building+with+metal+studs&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=com.mandriva:en-US:official&client=firefox-a
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Reason #345 not to ask. Just haul the 2x4's in and do the job.
s

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