How to attach wooden ball to metal conduit

I want to make a sturdy walking stick from a piece of leftover EMT conduit. I'll put a rubber cane tip on the bottom, and for a handle I was gonna use a heavy hardwood "cannonball" finial a little bigger than a cue ball. What's the best way to attach it so it won't come off? I think maybe drilling a 3/4" blind hole in the bottom and glueing it over the end with JB Weld might be pretty close, but shouldn't it be pinned or something? Or what about using a lag screw into a lead anchor?
I don't want the thing to come off if I'm twirling the cane like an idiot or something. ;-)
Bob
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I put balls from the craft store on the end of EMT for some shop-made tool handles. I drilled and tapped the balls for 3/8 coarse bolt thread. A 3/8 bolt head will jam into 1/2 EMT conduit, which I then brazed. Then you just screw the ball onto the end of the shaft. I didn't use any glue.
You need at least a drill press, or better a lathe, to drill a sphere straight and true.
If you were to drill a larger hole to receive the whole EMT tube into the ball, you'd weaken the ball.
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

That should work. thanks!
Bob
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Cut some saw teeth into the end of a piece of emt with a file and make a hole in the wooden ball with this as a saw. Then you can glue the emt into the hole and the plug into the emt. If you want it to be even more secure you can take a short stub of brazing rod and cross dril the assembly through emt and ball and use the brazing rod as a pin. Easy to file off the excess smooth.
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

I've about decided to braze a nut in the end of the EMT, sand a flat on the surface of the ball and drill a slightly-too-small hole all the way thru it for a 3/8" carriage bolt. The flat will be on the top and it's so the head of the carriage bolt won't stick up.
Bob
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I think you are better off with the original idea of drilling a blind hole and using epoxy to set the conduit in the hole. With the brazed nut, the nut is the only attachment point and shear forces will be concentrated there. Use a rasp to roughen the conduit before gluing. Don't drill into the end grain on the ball. -- H
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Heathcliff wrote: ...

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If actually brazes the nut, the weld will be nearly as strong (if not stronger) than the wall of the EMT will be against collapse.
As a suggestion, if you go this route, why not use a coupling nut rather than just an ordinary hex nut -- this would provide a much longer solid section at the top of the EMT.
--
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Some time back, I fitted a wooden ball to a hand reamer/trimmer for trimming shell casings. Same problem but on a smaller scale. Got a wood ball that already had a dowel hole. Reamed hole out a tad to the right size. Dab of quick set epoxy, and some spray paint, and it works fine. Make the hold just deep enough to secure the pipe -- maybe 3-4 pipe diameters, at most. The epoxy will keep it secure. Try for a pretty snug fit.
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If you do use epoxy for this project, be sure to rough up the mating surfaces to give the epoxy some bite.
Apply vaseline to any surfaces that you *don't* want the epoxy to adhere to.
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